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California

Trump’s big idea to fix homelessness is to do what California is already doing — sort of

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson visited skid row in Los Angeles on Wednesday.

President Trump’s big idea for fixing California’s homelessness crisis should look familiar to many prominent Democrats: Eliminate layers of regulation to make it easier and cheaper to build more housing.

On the eve of a two-day swing through the state this week, Trump’s Council of Economic Advisors released a report blaming “decades of misguided and faulty policies” for putting too many restrictions on development and causing home prices to rise to unaffordable levels. It’s a continuation of a strategy that the president began in June, when he signed an executive order to establish a White House council to “confront the regulatory barriers to affordable housing development.”

“Harmful local government policies in select cities, along with ineffective federal government policies of prior administrations, have exaggerated the homelessness problem,” Tom Philipson, acting chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors, told reporters Monday.

Although the administration’s argument broadly mirrors what some Democratic lawmakers have been trying to do in California — easing rules on development, allowing fourplexes on land currently zoned for single-family homes or cutting some state environmental rules that restrict building — it’s too simple to link Trump’s approach with that of his liberal antagonists, several state lawmakers said.

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Instead, they said, the president’s positions on homelessness are more about trolling California than attempting to find actual solutions. Some also argue that the administration’s report takes a common Republican tactic — deregulation — that often benefits the party’s deep-pocketed donors and slaps it on yet another subject — homelessness.

Democratic state Assemblyman Miguel Santiago, who represents skid row and other neighborhoods in downtown Los Angeles, is the author of recently passed legislation that would make it harder to use state environmental laws to block homeless housing and shelters in Los Angeles.

He said it was hard to take Trump’s ideas seriously when the president has also proposed cutting federal housing dollars and rolling back Obama-era rules that aimed to desegregate neighborhoods. Another proposed Trump administration policy would deny federal housing aid to households that include anyone living in the country illegally, even when other members are eligible for such aid as lawful residents or U.S. citizens.

“I think it’s politics at its worst where he is going to pick on a vulnerable community — no different than when he picked on immigrants — and he’s going to target them,” Santiago said. “We’re already hearing it: ‘Here’s West Coast liberals, not able to solve the problem.’ I think it’s a little cynical for someone who has done everything in their right mind to make it worse on the working poor.”

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The debate over whether to fund a 64-unit homeless housing complex in Chatsworth will now head to the Los Angeles City Council.

The Trump administration’s report says that the San Francisco and Los Angeles metropolitan areas could see huge reductions in homelessness if they were to unwind restrictions on development, estimating that the population of people living on the streets and in shelters would go down by more than half and 40%, respectively.

The report doesn’t cite any specific regulations that are increasing housing costs, nor recommendations on what regulations should be eliminated.

State Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco), who has made a name for himself arguing for the reduction of local zoning rules, said he disagreed with the Trump administration’s apparent pitch to cut back on all regulations and allow for more building of all types everywhere. Instead, his recently shelved Senate Bill 50 was designed to make it easier to build housing near existing job centers and mass transit specifically for affordability and environmental reasons.

Wiener also pointed to national Democrats, such as presidential candidates Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Cory Booker of New Jersey, and former President Obama, who have pushed for stripping away some development rules as part of their plans to make housing more affordable.

“I don’t agree with the president’s view that we should be like Arizona, because that would lead to sprawl,” Wiener said. “But I do agree with Elizabeth Warren, Cory Booker and Barack Obama that we should move away from restrictive housing policies because restrictive housing policies lead to more homelessness.”

In addition to deregulation, the Trump administration’s report also calls for using law enforcement to deal with homeless people and encampments, arguing that “more tolerable conditions for sleeping on the streets” increased the homeless population.

That argument has largely been panned by experts, who point to more complicated, intertwined causes of homelessness, including poverty, addiction and lack of affordable housing. Therefore, the recommendation to use police is wrongheaded as well, said Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti.

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“The White House report on homelessness treats this crisis like fodder for a cable news debate,” Garcetti said in a statement. “We don’t have time for that. If the president really cares about solving this crisis, he wouldn’t be talking about criminalization over housing. He’d be making dramatic increases in funding for this country’s housing safety net.”

In the last week, Trump’s advisors have toured homeless encampments and public housing projects in Los Angeles and San Francisco, but offered few solutions.

On Wednesday morning, after meeting with LAPD Chief Michel Moore, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson visited skid row to tour the Union Rescue Mission. He didn’t offer much substance about the administration’s plans, but he encouraged a greater focus on public-private partnerships.

Carson also indicated that HUD might start reserving housing grants to local governments that are willing to make changes to local zoning laws.

“We will get preference points to people who are willing to look at these things,” he said. “You know, we have so many archaic rules on the books all over the country.”

Later Wednesday, Carson rejected a request made earlier this week by Gov. Gavin Newsom and other elected officials for additional resources for homelessness, including 50,000 housing vouchers. In his written response, Carson echoed the report from Trump’s Council of Economic Advisors.

“Your letter seeks more federal dollars for California from hardworking American taxpayers, but fails to admit that your state and local policies have played a major role in creating the current crisis,” he wrote. “If California’s homeless population had held in line with overall population trends, America’s homeless rate would have decreased. Instead, the opposite has happened, as California’s unsheltered homelessness population has skyrocketed as a result of the state’s overregulated housing market, its inefficient allocation of resources and its policies that have weakened law enforcement.”

Dan O’Flaherty, a Columbia University economics professor whose work is cited more than half a dozen times in the Trump administration’s report, said he agreed that loosening local home-building rules would decrease costs and lessen homelessness. But he said that the report vastly overstates the potential effects of doing so.

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And even if the report is correct that deregulation would reduce Los Angeles’ current homeless population by 40%, it would still take decades for that to happen.

“You do 40% over 40 years?” O’Flaherty said. “Big whoopie.”

Overall, O’Flaherty said, the report ignored well-regarded research that shows public subsidies can help homeless people find new homes, and it instead asserted without evidence that simply increasing mental health and drug treatment programs without housing assistance would decrease the homeless population.

Dr. Margot Kushel, a professor of medicine at UC San Francisco who recently received a $30-million grant from Salesforce Chief Executive Marc Benioff and his wife to study solutions to homelessness, panned the Trump administration’s report as being out of line with most research on the subject.

One notable lapse, she said, was that it argued that permanent supportive housing, which attempts to house people who are chronically homeless and have disabilities in buildings that also have social services, was ineffectual. Multiple studies, she said, show that 85% or more of those receiving such housing stay there.

The success of permanent supportive housing, she said, “is not controversial, and it has had broad bipartisan support because the evidence is so overwhelming.”

Like others, Heidi Marston, chief program officer for the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority, questioned whether some in the Trump administration, including Carson, really understood the best practices being used to help homeless people.

For example, during his visit to skid row Wednesday, Carson offered a somewhat muddled answer to a question about “housing first,” the widely accepted national model that prioritizes getting people off the streets and into permanent supportive housing, regardless of their sobriety or health status.

“When we talk about something like housing first, housing first is a good idea because it gets people off the street and it actually costs less money when you get them off the street,” he said. “But you can’t stop with housing first. You have to go with housing second, which means you diagnose the reason that they were there in the first place, and housing third, which means you try to fix it.”

Marston would love to see the federal government offer more help on homelessness, and she was among those who met with Trump officials last week.

“We focused on educating them,” she said, “trying to help them understand why we practice a low-barrier approach and what housing first really means.”


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