Aerial photos capture the scope of the O.C. oil spill

A brown-colored splotch against a background of iridescent swirls
A view of the oil flowing through the Talbert channel in Huntington Beach on Oct. 3, 2021.
(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
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The full scope of the weekend oil spill in Orange County remains unclear. But the leak of at least 126,000 gallons of crude oil is one of the largest in recent years in California. However, the size is still far less than several other catastrophic spills in the state and elsewhere. Aerial photos capture the magnitude of the damage caused by the spill.

 An aerial view of people gathered near the edge of a blue-green body of water surrounded by sand
Crews clean up oil in a pool tainted by the spill in Huntington Beach on Oct. 4, 2021.
(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
An aerial photo of white barriers keeping out spilled oil from wetlands
Booms have been set up to keep the spill from spreading further in Talbert Marsh in Huntington Beach on Oct. 4, 2021.
(Ringo H.W. Chiu / Associated Press)
An aerial view of booms placed to help stop the oil from spreading further
Booms help curtail the spread of the oil spill in Talbert Marsh in Huntington Beach on Oct. 4, 2021.
(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
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Waves break along a sandy stretch with a dark brown patch on the right
A sand berm and booms help corral the oil, right, that flowed in due to high tide in Huntington Beach on Oct. 3, 2021.
(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
Aerial view of a line of booms stretches across water, with two boats at end, near shoreline
Workers in boats try to clean up Talbert Marsh on Oct. 3, 2021.
(David McNew / AFP/Getty Images)
Darkened body of water flows between two parallel rows of rocks
The oil spill was visible on shore and in the water in Huntington Beach on Oct. 4, 2021.
(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
An aerial picture of sand berms and heavy equipment near swirling waves and a rocky barrier
Heavy machinery and sand berms are among the tools used to keep the spill from spreading.
(David McNew / AFP/Getty Images)