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The 2024 Emmys BuzzMeter looks at the awards possibilities

A man in early Japanese garb rides a horse and carries a bird of prey on his arm in a scene from “Shōgun."
Hiroyuki Sanada plays Lord Yoshii Toranaga, a central figure in “Shōgun.”
(Colin Bentley / FX)
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The daylight hours are getting longer — which might mean you’d rather not spend all your free time catching up on the best TV you’ve missed this past year. Fear not, the Emmys BuzzMeter panelists are here to cut through the clutter with our Round 1 picks.

This early round is all about the “buzz”: a mix of shows and names that already have people’s attention as well as those we think deserve to be in the conversation as the 2024 Emmys race heats up. Use it as a viewing guide or tell us why we’re wrong (we know how the internet works). The six of us have ranked our picks in 14 of the main categories, with our top choices earning the most points. Round 2 will be our predictions for what will actually get nominated by the Television Academy on July 17. In Round 3, we’ll predict the winners ahead of the Sept. 15 ceremony.

Headshots of three women and three men arranged in a grid.
Your Emmys BuzzMeter panel: Lorraine Ali (Los Angeles Times), Kristen Baldwin (Entertainment Weekly), Tracy Brown (Los Angeles Times), Trey Mangum (Shadow & Act), Matt Roush (TV Guide), Glenn Whipp (Los Angeles Times).
(Photo treatment by Gluekit; photographs by Myung J. Chun / Los Angeles Times, Christina House / Los Angeles Times, Anna Watts / For The Times)
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    1. “Shōgun”
    2. “Fallout”
    3. “The Gilded Age”
    4. “The Crown”
    5. “Mr. and Mrs. Smith”
    6. “Slow Horses”
    7. (tie) “The Curse”
    7. (tie) “Monarch: Legacy of Monsters”
    9. “3 Body Problem”
    10. “The Morning Show”
    11. (tie) “Elsbeth”
    11. (tie) “For All Mankind”
    13. (tie) “Ahsoka”
    13. (tie) “Found”
    13. (tie) “Sugar”
    16. “Tokyo Vice”

    Nearly every series nominated last year is nowhere to be found for the 2024 race — reigning winner “Succession” and perennial nominee “Better Call Saul” concluded their runs last year and new seasons of “Andor,” “House of the Dragon,” “The Last of Us,” “The White Lotus” and “Yellowjackets” have yet to air (most are still in various stages of production).

    With the race seemingly wide open, most panelists have thrown their weight behind new shows. Coming out on top in these early rankings is “Shōgun,” FX’s historical drama that many had initially presumed would be competing in the limited series categories until FX made the Season 2 (and 3) renewal official. That shakeup reverberated throughout all the drama categories. “It deserves to win everything,” says Times columnist Glenn Whipp.

    Other new shows the panelists are enthusiastic about include Prime Video’s stylish postapocalyptic video game adaptation “Fallout” and its character-driven spy thriller “Mr. & Mrs. Smith.”

    Two different sorts of period dramas, HBO’s frivolously fun “The Gilded Age” and Netflix’s past winner “The Crown” (a “Television Academy favorite,” laments Times columnist Lorraine Ali) round out the top five.

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    While panelist Matt Roush makes his case for “two neglected Apple TV+ favorites, ‘Slow Horses’ and ‘For All Mankind,’” to finally “pique Emmy voters’ interest,” Trey Mangum says new network TV standouts “Elsbeth” and “Found” “should be injected into the conversation.” And I think an Emmy nod for Apple TV+’s “Monarch: Legacy of Monsters” would pair nicely with Godzilla’s Oscar win (visual effects for “Godzilla Minus One”) from earlier this year.

    Also among the whopping 16 shows the panelists think you should add to your FYC viewing queue are Apple TV+’s media workplace drama “The Morning Show,” Netflix’s sci-fi epic “3 Body Problem,” Disney+’s latest Star Wars installment, “Ahsoka,” and Max’s cross-cultural crime thriller “Tokyo Vice.”

    Lorraine Ali
    Los Angeles Times

    1. “Shōgun”
    2. “Fallout”
    3. “Monarch: Legacy of Monsters”
    4. “Mr. and Mrs. Smith”
    5. “Lupin”
    6. (tie) “3 Body Problem”
    6. (tie) “Elsbeth”
    6. (tie) “The Gilded Age”

    The intense and beautiful FX drama “Shōgun” tops my nominee list in most every drama category. Based on James Clavell’s 1975 novel, the compelling story of power and politics in 1600s Japan is told largely from the perspective of the Japanese rather than the European interlopers. But it’s up against the Television Academy favorite “The Crown,” and colonialism always wins. Sigh.

    Kristen Baldwin
    Entertainment Weekly

    1. “Shōgun”
    2. “Fallout”
    3. “The Gilded Age”
    4. “The Crown”
    5. “Mr. and Mrs. Smith”
    6. “The Curse”
    7. “Slow Horses”
    8. “The Morning Show”

    This could be the season’s most exciting race, since so many repeat contenders (“Succession,” “Better Call Saul,” “The White Lotus,” “The Last of Us,” “Yellowjackets”) aren’t eligible this year. And “Shōgun’s” last-minute switch from limited series to drama will shake up many of the acting categories as well.

    Tracy Brown
    Los Angeles Times

    1. “Shōgun”
    2. “Fallout”
    3. “Monarch: Legacy of Monsters”
    4. “The Gilded Age”
    5. “Mr. and Mrs. Smith”
    6. “3 Body Problem”
    7. “Ahsoka”
    8. “Elsbeth”

    With so many of last year’s nominees out of contention this year, the drama race seemed wide open. At least until the news of “Shōgun’s” renewal bumped it from being a limited series. FX’s jidaigeki should clean house, but I’d like to see another big Japanese icon, Godzilla (the elusive monster of “Monarch: Legacy of Monsters”), get some Emmy recognition after winning an Oscar earlier this year.

    Trey Mangum
    Shadow and Act

    1. “Fallout”
    2. “The Gilded Age”
    3. “Shōgun”
    4. “The Crown”
    5. “3 Body Problem”
    6. “The Morning Show”
    7. “Found”
    8. “Elsbeth”

    “Fallout” would be a very strong contender here, with “The Morning Show,” “The Crown” and more returning shows proving a huge threat. However, seeing that a second season of “Shōgun” has been announced, this category has been completely upended. Two shows that are on network television that, if any, should be injected into the conversation should be newbie standouts “Elsbeth” and “Found.”

    Matt Roush
    TV Guide

    1. “Shōgun”
    2. “Slow Horses”
    3. “The Gilded Age”
    4. “The Crown”
    5. “For All Mankind”
    6. “Fallout”
    7. “The Curse”
    8. “The Morning Show”

    ”Shōgun’s” surprise entry spices up what was an intriguing if not particularly thrilling year for TV drama. I’m still hoping two neglected Apple TV+ favorites, “Slow Horses” and “For All Mankind,” will eventually pique Emmy voters’ interest, and am curious how the final season of “The Crown” will fare, given the timing after the queen’s passing.

    Glenn Whipp
    Los Angeles Times

    1. “Shōgun”
    2. “The Crown”
    3. “The Curse”
    4. “Fallout”
    5. “Mr. and Mrs. Smith”
    6. “Slow Horses”
    7. “Sugar”
    8. “Tokyo Vice”

    Between the strikes and shows like “Succession” and “Better Call Saul” leaving the airwaves, the drama series cupboard is pretty bare this year, making it a relief that “Shōgun” moved here from limited series. It deserves to win everything.

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    1. Anna Sawai (“Shōgun”)
    2. Ella Purnell (“Fallout”)
    3. Emma Stone (“The Curse”)
    4. Carrie Coon (“The Gilded Age”)
    5. Maya Erskine (“Mr. and Mrs. Smith”)
    6. Imelda Staunton (“The Crown”)
    7. Shanola Hampton (“Found”)
    8. Jennifer Aniston (“The Morning Show”)
    9. (tie) Carrie Preston (“Elsbeth”)
    9. (tie) Reese Witherspoon (“The Morning Show”)
    11. Jess Hong (“3 Body Problem”)

    Nobody from last year’s class of nominees is eligible this time, which leaves the field wide open for new faces. At (or near) the top of every panelist’s list for this round is Anna Sawai, who, as Lorraine Ali says, “impresses with her quiet-storm performance in ‘Shōgun’ as the conflicted interpreter, Mariko.”

    “Fallout’s” breakout star Ella Purnell, who plays an upbeat and (bomb-) sheltered survivor who learns some harsh truths about her postapocalyptic world after venturing out to the surface, also has won over a majority of the panelists.

    Rounding out the top three is Emma Stone, who just won her second Oscar. “Were it not for Anna Sawai (‘Shōgun’), I wouldn’t begrudge her winning an Emmy for expertly playing the least self-aware person in the history of the world in ‘The Curse,’” says Glenn Whipp.

    Panelist Kristen Baldwin says, “Maya Erskine deserves her first acting nod for her delightfully deadpan turn in ‘Mr. & Mrs. Smith.’“ Matt Roush insists Carrie Coon also “deserves notice” for “rising above the fluff of ‘The Gilded Age.’” Trey Mangum, meanwhile, makes the case for Shanola Hampton, who “makes anchoring her own vehicle look easy on NBC’s ‘Found.’”

    Also on the panelists’ radar are “The Morning Show’s” Jennifer Aniston and Reese Witherspoon — the only contenders whose nominations would be repeats — as well as an expected nod for Imelda Staunton for her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth II in “The Crown.”

    Lorraine Ali
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Anna Sawai (“Shōgun”)
    2. (tie) Maya Erskine (“Mr. and Mrs. Smith”)
    2. (tie) Ella Purnell (“Fallout”)
    4. (tie) Carrie Preston (“Elsbeth”)
    4. (tie) Reese Witherspoon (“The Morning Show”)
    6. Jess Hong (“3 Body Problem”)

    Dream list of nominees: Anna Sawai, who impresses with her quiet-storm performance in “Shōgun” as the conflicted interpreter Mariko. Ella Purnell for her darkly humorous depiction of a sheltered creampuff turned survivalist in the dystopian video game adaptation “Fallout.” Maya Erskine as a dangerous spy posing as a benign spouse in “Mr. and Mrs. Smith.”

    Kristen Baldwin
    Entertainment Weekly

    1. Emma Stone (“The Curse”)
    2. Anna Sawai (“Shōgun”)
    3. Carrie Coon (“The Gilded Age”)
    4. Maya Erskine (“Mr. and Mrs. Smith”)
    5. Imelda Staunton (“The Crown”)
    6. Jennifer Aniston (“The Morning Show”)

    With only one repeat nominee (Jennifer Aniston) likely, this category will be refreshingly unpredictable. Imelda Staunton, passed over in this category for season 5 of “The Crown,” will get a farewell nomination for her final turn as Queen Elizabeth, and Maya Erskine deserves her first acting nod for her delightfully deadpan turn in “Mr. & Mrs. Smith.”

    Tracy Brown
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Anna Sawai (“Shōgun”)
    2. Ella Purnell (“Fallout”)
    3. Maya Erskine (“Mr. and Mrs. Smith”)
    4. Carrie Coon (“The Gilded Age”)
    5. Jess Hong (“3 Body Problem”)
    6. Carrie Preston (“Elsbeth”)

    There is no “Shōgun” without Anna Sawai. But I’d also really like to see Ella Purnell, who plays an upbeat (bomb-) sheltered kid who learns a lot of harsh truths about her postapocalyptic world in “Fallout,” and Jess Hong, as a theoretical physicist whose science can hopefully save humanity in “3 Body Problem,” break into the category.

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    Trey Mangum
    Shadow and Act

    1. Shanola Hampton (“Found”)
    2. Ella Purnell (“Fallout”)
    3. Anna Sawai (“Shōgun”)
    4. Carrie Coon (“The Gilded Age”)
    5. Reese Witherspoon (“The Morning Show”)
    6. Jennifer Aniston (“The Morning Show”)

    It’s not often that this category has the potential to be a wide-open field, but it seems more likely this year. You have “The Morning Show” ladies in Jennifer Aniston and Reese Witherspoon, who could easily dominate the conversation. Carrie Coon could be coming for that Emmy for “The Gilded Age,” and if she can command as much buzz for her performance as the show has, I definitely wouldn’t count out “Fallout” lead Ella Purnell. But after starring for years on “Shameless,” Shanola Hampton makes anchoring her own vehicle look easy on NBC’s “Found.”

    Matt Roush
    TV Guide

    1. Emma Stone (“The Curse”)
    2. Anna Sawai (“Shōgun”)
    3. Carrie Coon (“The Gilded Age”)
    4. Jennifer Aniston (“The Morning Show”)
    5. Imelda Staunton (“The Crown”)
    6. Carrie Preston (“Elsbeth”)

    “The Curse” was polarizing, but there’s no denying Emma Stone nailed her excruciating character, another triumph in a banner year. Anna Sawai as “Shōgun’s” enigmatic interpreter also deserves notice, along with Carrie Coon rising above the fluff of “The Gilded Age.” Imelda Staunton was fine as “The Crown’s” elder queen, but she felt like a supporting character this year.

    Glenn Whipp
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Anna Sawai (“Shōgun”)
    2. Emma Stone (“The Curse”)
    3. Ella Purnell (“Fallout”)
    4. Imelda Staunton (“The Crown”)
    5. Maya Erskine (“Mr. and Mrs. Smith”)
    6. Carrie Coon (“The Gilded Age”)

    Emma Stone just won a second Oscar and were it not for Anna Sawai (“Shōgun”), I wouldn’t begrudge her winning an Emmy for expertly playing the least self-aware person in the history of the world in “The Curse.”

    1. Hiroyuki Sanada (“Shōgun”)
    2. Walton Goggins (“Fallout”)
    3. Donald Glover (“Mr. & Mrs. Smith”)
    4. Gary Oldman (“Slow Horses”)
    5. Ncuti Gatwa (“Doctor Who”)
    6. Cosmo Jarvis (“Shōgun”)
    7. (tie) Jacob Anderson (“Interview With the Vampire”)
    7. (tie) Dominic West (“The Crown”)
    9. (tie) Idris Elba (“Hijack”)
    9. (tie) Zahn McClarnon (“Dark Winds”)
    11. (tie) Nathan Fielder (“The Curse”)
    11. (tie) Omar Sy (“Lupin”)

    Much like drama lead actress, the lead actor category will see a completely new slate of names compared to last year’s nominees. Panelists have used the opportunity to advocate for a mix of new and overlooked favorites to make the cut this year.

    The overwhelming front-runner in this round is Hiroyuki Sanada, who is the shōgun of “Shōgun.” As the quietly ambitious Lord Toranaga, “The Japanese martial arts star has room to stretch beyond impressive swordfighting scenes … and he slays,” says Lorraine Ali.

    A close second is Walton Goggins, whose string of “morally ambiguous characters that you can’t help but love,” as panelist Glenn Whipp puts it, continues with his role on “Fallout.” Kristen Baldwin echoes the sentiment, insisting, “This is the year that Emmy voters shall rain down accolades on Walton Goggins, who commands the screen as the fearsome and funny Ghoul.”

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    Besides these buzziest newcomers, panelists are urging Emmy voters to finally consider actors from returning shows whose performances were previously overlooked. Matt Roush is “rooting for Gary Oldman to finally be recognized for bringing ‘Slow Horses’’’ Jackson Lamb to curmudgeonly life.” Trey Mangum insists, “We especially need to be talking about Jacob Anderson’s performance [in ‘Interview With the Vampire’], which only gets better in year two.”

    My under-the-radar pick is Ncuti Gatwa, who has infused new energy into the long-running British sci-fi staple “Doctor Who” as the newest Doctor (the Fifteenth, for those keeping count). Also in the conversation are Donald Glover, for his turn as the undercover newlywed spy in the character-driven spy thriller “Mr. & Mrs. Smith,” as well as Cosmo Jarvis, as the shipwrecked Englishman experiencing culture shock in “Shōgun.”

    Lorraine Ali
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Hiroyuki Sanada (“Shōgun”)
    2. Donald Glover (“Mr. & Mrs. Smith”)
    3. Walton Goggins (“Fallout”)
    4. Omar Sy (“Lupin”)
    5. Zahn McClarnon (“Dark Winds”)
    6. Idris Elba (“Hijack”)

    Sanada was one of the only reasons I stuck with “Westworld” after the first season. As the lovelorn samurai Musashi, he was a grounding presence inside a confusing-as-hell narrative. Now as “Shōgun’s” Lord Toranaga, the Japanese martial arts star has room to stretch beyond impressive swordfighting scenes … and he slays.

    Kristen Baldwin
    Entertainment Weekly

    1. Hiroyuki Sanada (“Shōgun”)
    2. Walton Goggins (“Fallout”)
    3. Donald Glover (“Mr. & Mrs. Smith”)
    4. Nathan Fielder (“The Curse”)
    5. Gary Oldman (“Slow Horses”)
    6. Dominic West (“The Crown”)

    Hear ye, hear ye! Let it be known throughout the land: This is the year that Emmy voters shall rain down accolades on Walton Goggins, who commands the screen as the fearsome and funny Ghoul in Prime Video’s hit adaptation of “Fallout.” Formerly a frontrunner for lead actor in a limited series, “Shōgun’s” Hiroyuki Sanada should have strong momentum in this category as well.

    Tracy Brown
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Hiroyuki Sanada (“Shōgun”)
    2. Walton Goggins (“Fallout”)
    3. Ncuti Gatwa (“Doctor Who”)
    4. Cosmo Jarvis (Shōgun”)
    5. Donald Glover (“Mr. & Mrs. Smith”)
    6. Zahn McClarnon (“Dark Winds”)

    Hiroyuki Sanada seems like a shoo-in as the Shōgun (to be) of “Shōgun,” though Walton Goggins as “Fallout’s” charismatic but ruthless Ghoul makes a very strong case here too. One performance I hope doesn’t get overlooked is Ncuti Gatwa as the charming, enthusiastic new Doctor (the Fifteenth, for those keeping count) who brings a fresh energy to the long-running British sci-fi favorite “Doctor Who.”

    Trey Mangum
    Shadow and Act

    1. Jacob Anderson (“Interview With the Vampire”)
    2. Ncuti Gatwa (“Doctor Who”)
    3. Hiroyuki Sanada (“Shōgun”)
    4. Idris Elba (“Hijack”)
    5. Walton Goggins (“Fallout”)
    6. Dominic West (“The Crown”)

    Not only do we need to be heavily talking about “Interview With the Vampire,” we especially need to be talking about Jacob Anderson’s performance, which only gets better in year 2. Walton Goggins is the glue that draws you into “Fallout,” Idris Elba getting in for “Hijack” would be a welcome surprise and the new Disney+ home for “Doctor Who” could translate into some well-deserved love for Ncuti Gatwa. But Hiroyuki Sanada is Shōgun, and at this point I can’t see it going any other way.

    Matt Roush
    TV Guide

    1. Hiroyuki Sanada (“Shōgun”)
    2. Gary Oldman (“Slow Horses”)
    3. Donald Glover (“Mr. & Mrs. Smith”)
    4. Walton Goggins (“Fallout”)
    5. Dominic West (“The Crown”)
    6. Zahn McClarnon (“Dark Winds”)

    Lee Jung-jae’s “Squid Game” win provides precedent for a lead actor to win for a non-English-language performance. Sanada’s majestic Lord Toranaga surely qualifies, though I’m also rooting for Gary Oldman to finally be recognized for bringing “Slow Horses’” Jackson Lamb to curmudgeonly life; ditto for Zahn McClarnon’s poignant portrayal of “Dark Winds’” Navajo policeman Joe Leaphorn.

    Glenn Whipp
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Hiroyuki Sanada (“Shōgun”)
    2. Cosmo Jarvis (“Shōgun”)
    3. Walton Goggins (“Fallout”)
    4. Gary Oldman (“Slow Horses”)
    5. Dominic West (“The Crown”)
    6. Donald Glover (“Mr. & Mrs. Smith”)

    Is there a better actor than Walton Goggins when it comes to playing morally ambiguous characters that you can’t help but love? If you’ve seen the postapocalyptic “Fallout” (or “Justified” or “The Hateful Eight” or … well, it’s a long list), you know that’s a rhetorical question.

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    1. Fumi Nikaido (“Shōgun”)
    2. Christine Baranski (“The Gilded Age”)
    3. Moeka Hoshi (“Shōgun”)
    4. Elizabeth Debicki (“The Crown”)
    5. Nicole Beharie (“The Morning Show”)
    6. Sarita Choudhury (“Fallout”)
    7. Audra McDonald (“The Gilded Age”)
    8. Holland Taylor (“The Morning Show”)
    9. Lesley Manville (“The Crown”)
    10. (tie) Karen Pittman (“The Morning Show”)
    10. (tie) Leslie Uggams (“Fallout”)
    12. (tie) Greta Lee (“The Morning Show”)
    12. (tie) Olivia Williams (“The Crown”)
    14. (tie) Kristen Scott Thomas (“Slow Horses”)
    14. (tie) Mari Yamamoto (“Monarch: Legacy of Monsters”)
    16. (tie) Cynthia Nixon (“The Gilded Age”)
    16. (tie) Amy Ryan (“Sugar”)
    18. Kiersey Clemons (“Monarch: Legacy of Monsters”)

    The ongoing theme in the drama races is that there will be very little overlap with last year’s nominees because most of those are not eligible this year. “The Crown’s” Elizabeth Debicki, who plays Diana, the doomed people’s princess, in the royal historical drama, is one of the few exceptions.

    Besides Debicki, frontrunners include “Shōgun” scene stealers Fumi Nikaido and Moeka Hoshi. Nikaido is captivating as the quietly calculating Lady Ochiba, the mother of the young lord expected to rule Japan once he comes of age, while Hoshi impresses as the mourning young mother-turned-consort Usami Fuji.

    A number of the panelists are rallying behind Christine Baranski. After being overlooked for the entirety of “The Good Fight’s” six-season run, Baranski is just as impressive as an old-money socialite in “The Gilded Age.” “I can’t keep my eyes off Christine Baranski,” says Lorraine Ali. Kristen Baldwin is more direct: “Do not make me fight you, Emmy voters!” Baranski’s castmates Audra McDonald and Cynthia Nixon also picked up some votes.

    And speaking of grudges against Emmy voters, Glenn Whipp says he still hasn’t forgiven them for overlooking Amy Ryan a couple of years ago. “She’s terrific in ‘Sugar,’ playing a one-time rock singer who can’t hide her tenderness behind a tough exterior,” he says.

    The supporting cast of “The Morning Show” also make a strong showing in our BuzzMeter rankings. “Nicole Beharie’s tour de force in Season 3 has not left my mind,” says Trey Mangum. “Her co-star Karen Pittman’s great performance is not mentioned as much but needs to be as well.” Matt Roush says he’s fond of “Holland Taylor raging against ageism and sexism,” and Greta Lee also made the list.

    The postapocalyptic “Fallout” also has a pair of actresses in the running. To avoid spoilers, let’s just say both Sarita Choudhury’s and Leslie Uggams’ characters are both much more than they initially seem.

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    Lorraine Ali
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Fumi Nikaido (“Shōgun”)
    2. (tie) Christine Baranski (“The Gilded Age”)
    2. (tie) Moeka Hoshi (“Shōgun”)
    4. Nicole Beharie (“The Morning Show”)
    5. Olivia Williams (“The Crown”)
    6. (tie) Sarita Choudhury (“Fallout”)
    6. (tie) Leslie Uggams (“Fallout”)
    8. Lesley Manville (“The Crown”)

    I want to like HBO’s “The Gilded Age,” but I keep hitting the same roadblock: It’s “Downton Abbey” with American accents and 1800s trimmings. That said, I can’t keep my eyes off Christine Baranski. She stands out, even against the blinding opulence of monied New York.

    Kristen Baldwin
    Entertainment Weekly

    1. Christine Baranski (“The Gilded Age”)
    2. Elizabeth Debicki (“The Crown”)
    3. Audra McDonald (“The Gilded Age”)
    4. Holland Taylor (“The Morning Show”)
    5. Greta Lee (“The Morning Show”)
    6. Moeka Hoshi (“Shōgun”)
    7. Kristen Scott Thomas (“Slow Horses”)
    8. Cynthia Nixon (“The Gilded Age”)

    There is literally no reason to believe that Christine Baranski — snubbed six times over for “The Good Fight” — won’t get back in the race this year for “The Gilded Age.” Literally. No. Reason. Do not make me fight you, Emmy voters!

    Tracy Brown
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Fumi Nikaido (“Shōgun”)
    2. Christine Baranski (“The Gilded Age”)
    3. Moeka Hoshi (“Shōgun”)
    4. Sarita Choudhury (“Fallout”)
    5. Nicole Beharie (“The Morning Show”)
    6. Mari Yamamoto (“Monarch: Legacy of Monsters”)
    7. Audra McDonald (“The Gilded Age”)
    8. Kiersey Clemons (“Monarch: Legacy of Monsters”)

    I’m usually an advocate of spreading the love in the supporting acting categories but both Fumi Nikaido and Moeka Hoshi were outstanding in “Shōgun.” Christine Baranski was criminally overlooked for her work on “The Good Fight” and I hope that trend doesn’t continue with “The Gilded Age.” And Sarita Choudhury was a pleasant surprise in “Fallout.”

    Trey Mangum
    Shadow and Act

    1. Nicole Beharie (“The Morning Show”)
    2. Karen Pittman (“The Morning Show”)
    3. Audra McDonald (“The Gilded Age”)
    4. Sarita Choudhury (“Fallout”)
    5. Leslie Uggams (“Fallout”)
    6. Elizabeth Debicki (“The Crown”)
    7. Fumi Nikaido (“Shōgun”)
    8. Moeka Hoshi (“Shōgun”)

    Since “The Morning Show” was released pretty early in the cycle, many may have moved on, but Nicole Beharie’s tour de force in Season 3 has not left my mind. Her co-star Karen Pittman’s great performance is not mentioned as much but needs to be as well. But this pair may get outdone by a couple of “Shōgun” scene stealers, although I’d love it if the category was stolen by one of the “Fallout” women.

    Matt Roush
    TV Guide

    1. Christine Baranski (“The Gilded Age”)
    2. Elizabeth Debicki (“The Crown”)
    3. Holland Taylor (“The Morning Show”)
    4. Moeka Hoshi (“Shōgun”)
    5. Fumi Nikaido (“Shōgun”)
    6. Lesley Manville (“The Crown”)
    7. Nicole Beharie (“The Morning Show”)
    8. Cynthia Nixon (“The Gilded Age”)

    While their seasons left much to be desired, “The Morning Show,” “The Crown” and “The Gilded Age” provided plenty of opportunity for juicy scene-stealing. Elizabeth Debicki could easily repeat as the doomed Princess Diana, but I’m fond of Christine Baranski’s “Gilded” dragon lady and “Morning Show’s” Holland Taylor raging against ageism and sexism.

    Glenn Whipp
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Fumi Nikaido (“Shōgun”)
    2. Elizabeth Debicki (“The Crown”)
    3. Moeka Hoshi (“Shōgun”)
    4. Sarita Choudhury (“Fallout”)
    5. Lesley Manville (“The Crown”)
    6. Nicole Beharie (“The Morning Show”)
    7. Amy Ryan (“Sugar”)
    8. Kristen Scott Thomas (“Slow Horses”)

    I’m still holding a grudge against Emmy voters for overlooking Amy Ryan’s brilliant turn in the first season of “Only Murders in the Building.” She’s terrific in “Sugar,” playing a one-time rock singer who can’t hide her tenderness behind a tough exterior.

    1. Tadanobu Asano (“Shōgun”)
    2. Nathan Lane (“The Gilded Age”)
    3. Takehiro Hira (“Shōgun”)
    4. Moisés Arias (“Fallout”)
    5. Benny Safdie (“The Curse”)
    6. (tie) Khalid Abdalla (“The Crown”)
    6. (tie) Billy Crudup (“The Morning Show”)
    6. (tie) Jon Hamm (“The Morning Show”)
    9. Benedict Wong (“3 Body Problem”)
    10. Jonathan Pryce (“The Crown”)
    11. Barkhad Abdi (“The Curse”)
    12. Jovan Adepo (“3 Body Problem”)
    13. Aaron Moten (“Fallout”)
    14. Wendell Pierce (“Elsbeth”)
    15. (tie) Jack Lowden (“Slow Horses”)
    15. (tie) Ke Huy Quan (“Loki”)
    17. (tie) Hayden Christiansen (“Ahsoka”)
    17. (tie) Richard Schiff (“The Good Doctor”)
    17. (tie) Ken Watanabe (“Tokyo Vice”)

    The overwhelming front-runner in this early round is Tadanobu Asano, who charms as “Shōgun’s” wily and opportunistic Yabushige. Asano, as Glenn Whipp notes, is “a legit movie star in Japan” and he “brings a boisterous joy, bracing intelligence and rock-star presence to the role.”

    Asano’s castmate Takehiro Hira, whose ambitious Lord Ishido is leading the charge against Hiroyuki Sanada’s Lord Toranaga, also has momentum. Perched between the “Shōgun” pair is Nathan Lane, who portrays the snobbish arbiter of who and what are considered elite in the glitzy “The Gilded Age.”

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    Also with a strong showing is “Fallout’s” Moisés Arias, who portrays the cowardly younger brother turned determined sleuth who lives in an underground bomb shelter in the video game adaptation. Also making the list from the show is Aaron Moten, who portrays an aspiring knight of a paramilitary order.

    A pair from “3 Body Problem” also have support from the panelists. “Jovan Adepo is one of the best parts, if not the best part of ‘3 Body Problem,’” says Trey Mangum. Matt Roush shouts out Benedict Wong for “bringing some welcome humanity and humor as the [show’s] beleaguered detective.”

    And while feelings may be mixed about “The Curse” overall, the acting was solid. “In addition to Benny Safdie, who was so unsettling as ‘The Curse’s’ creepy-sad reality TV producer, here’s hoping voters also nominate Barkhad Abdi, who was mesmerizingly stoic as a local squatter named Abshir,” says Kristen Baldwin.

    Also in the mix are “The Morning Show’s” Billy Crudup and Jon Hamm; the latter has the potential to be a double nominee with his role on “Fargo.” “The Crown’s” Khalid Abdalla and Jonathan Pryce also are among the 19 names that made the panelists’ lists.

    Lorraine Ali
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Tadanobu Asano (“Shōgun”)
    2. Takehiro Hira (“Shōgun”)
    3. Moisés Arias (“Fallout”)
    4. (tie) Nathan Lane (“The Gilded Age”)
    4. (tie) Benedict Wong (“3 Body Problem”)
    6. (tie) Khalid Abdalla (“The Crown”)
    6. (tie) Jon Hamm (“The Morning Show”)
    6. (tie) Jonathan Pryce (“The Crown”)

    Another plus for “Shōgun”? Tadanobu Asano’s nuanced portrayal of the charismatic and deadly Kashigi Yabushige. The famous Japanese actor brings treachery and playfulness to his depiction of the Lord of Izu, creating an unpredictable character whose shifty and oddly endearing persona stays with viewers.

    Kristen Baldwin
    Entertainment Weekly

    1. Benny Safdie (“The Curse”)
    2. Tadanobu Asano (“Shōgun”)
    3. Nathan Lane (“The Gilded Age”)
    4. Barkhad Abdi (“The Curse”)
    5. Billy Crudup (“The Morning Show”)
    6. Jon Hamm (“The Morning Show”)
    7. Jonathan Pryce (“The Crown”)
    8. Khalid Abdalla (“The Crown”)

    In addition to Benny Safdie, who was so unsettling as “The Curse’s” creepy-sad reality TV producer, here’s hoping voters also nominate Barkhad Abdi, who was mesmerizingly stoic as a local squatter named Abshir. Jon Hamm, meanwhile, is probably going to be a double nominee this year. (See lead actor in a limited series.)

    Tracy Brown
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Tadanobu Asano (“Shōgun”)
    2. Moisés Arias (“Fallout”)
    3. Takehiro Hira (“Shōgun”)
    4. Nathan Lane (“The Gilded Age”)
    5. Benedict Wong (“3 Body Problem”)
    6. Ke Huy Quan (“Loki”)
    7. Wendell Pierce (“Elsbeth”)
    8. Hayden Christiansen (“Ahsoka”)

    It was really great seeing Tadanobu Asano get to show why he’s a star in Japan in “Shōgun,” where he plays the charismatic Yabushige, a lord happy to play whatever cards he needs to to get ahead. I also hope Moisés Arias can generate enough buzz for his turn as Norm, who grows from timid younger brother to resourceful sleuth over the course of the first season of “Fallout.”

    Trey Mangum
    Shadow and Act

    1. Jovan Adepo (“3 Body Problem”)
    2. Aaron Moten (“Fallout”)
    3. Moisés Arias (“Fallout”)
    4. Barkhad Abdi (“The Curse”)
    5. Billy Crudup (“The Morning Show”)
    6. Khalid Abdalla (“The Crown”)
    7. Wendell Pierce (“Elsbeth”)
    8. Jon Hamm (“The Morning Show”)

    Jovan Adepo is one of the best parts, if not the best part of “3 Body Problem,” and if you’re talking about the show, you have to be talking about his performance. Same thing could be said for Oscar winner Barkhad Abdi for “The Curse.” While Billy Crudup is just as stellar as he’s ever been in “The Morning Show,” the understated but equally great “Fallout” performances from Aaron Moten and Moisés Arias are two of my top highlights as well.

    Matt Roush
    TV Guide

    1. Tadanobu Asano (“Shōgun”)
    2. Jon Hamm (“The Morning Show”)
    3. Billy Crudup (“The Morning Show”)
    4. Benedict Wong (“3 Body Problem”)
    5. Benny Safdie (“The Curse”)
    6. Nathan Lane (“The Gilded Age”)
    7. Takehiro Hira (“Shōgun”)
    8. Richard Schiff (“The Good Doctor”)

    Don’t be surprised if Jon Hamm double-dips this year as “Fargo’s” evil sheriff and “The Morning Show’s” duplicitous mogul. “Shogun’s” Tadanobu Asano could upstage his better-known rivals as the wily Yabushige. Dark horse: Benedict Wong, bringing some welcome humanity and humor as the beleaguered detective in Netflix’s “3 Body Problem.”

    Glenn Whipp
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Tadanobu Asano (“Shōgun”)
    2. Khalid Abdalla (“The Crown”)
    3. Jonathan Pryce (“The Crown”)
    4. Takehiro Hira (“Shōgun”)
    5. Benny Safdie (“The Curse”)
    6. Jack Lowden (“Slow Horses”)
    7. Nathan Lane (“The Gilded Age”)
    8. Ken Watanabe (“Tokyo Vice”)

    Tadanobu Asano is a legit movie star in Japan, and anyone making his acquaintance for the first time in “Shogun” can now understand why. Playing the charismatic, opportunistic Lord Kashigi Yabushige, Asano brings a boisterous joy, bracing intelligence and rock-star presence to the role.

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    Two men and a woman walk down a school hallway in "Abbott Elementary."
    Tyler James Williams, left, Quinta Brunson and Chris Perfetti star in “Abbott Elementary.”
    (Prashant Gupta / ABC)

    1. “Abbott Elementary”
    2. “Reservation Dogs”
    3. “The Bear”
    4. “Hacks”
    5. “I’m a Virgo”
    6. “What We Do in the Shadows”
    7. (tie) “Curb Your Enthusiasm”
    7. (tie) “Ghosts”
    7. (tie) “We Are Lady Parts”
    10. (tie) “Diarra From Detroit”
    10. (tie) “Gen V”
    12. “Palm Royale”
    13. “Only Murders in the Building”
    14. “Our Flag Means Death”
    15. “The Brothers Sun”
    16. “The Gentlemen”

    Comedy series is shaping up to be one of the most competitive races. Among the frontrunners is the broadcast TV favorite “Abbott Elementary,” which always has a strong showing. The other titan in the race is “The Bear,” which cleaned house at last year’s ceremony even as it was bombarded with questions about its status as a comedy.

    “Does the answer even matter? No. I’m fine with another Emmy sweep for ‘The Bear,’” says Glenn Whipp.

    Elbowing its way into the conversation is “Reservation Dogs,” the heartfelt coming-of-age series about a group of teens growing up on the Muscogee Nation in Oklahoma, which has yet to receive any love from Emmy voters. “Its third and final season was a masterpiece so it’s time,” says Lorraine Ali. I agree! Meanwhile, panelist Matt Roush is pushing for “Ghosts” to finally get some attention for its “great ensemble cast and clever humor that used to score before network TV became invisible.”

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    Among the shows that panelists are urging people to notice are “I’m a Virgo,” “Boots Riley’s searing social satire about the evils of capitalism,” says Kristen Baldwin. Trey Mangum is throwing his support behind superhero spinoff “Gen V” and contemporary whodunit “Diarra From Detroit,” which he calls “one of the best comedies on television that fully needs to be on everyone’s watchlist.”

    Previous nominees that also made the list include “Hacks,” “Curb Your Enthusiasm” and “Only Murders in the Building.”

    Lorraine Ali
    Los Angeles Times

    1. (tie) “Reservation Dogs”
    1. (tie) “We Are Lady Parts”
    3. “Palm Royale”
    4. “Abbott Elementary”
    5. “The Brothers Sun”
    6. (tie) “Curb Your Enthusiasm”
    6. (tie) “Gen V”
    8. “Ghosts”

    This is the most competitive category of 2024. “Reservation Dogs” has never won an Emmy and its third and final season was a masterpiece, so it’s time. “Palm Royale,” which is set in the socialite scene of ’60s Palm Beach, is a perfectly hilarious journey into an absurd subculture. And my pipe dream? Season two of “We Are Lady Parts,” the British comedy about a female, Muslim punk band where hijab jokes abound.

    Kristen Baldwin
    Entertainment Weekly

    1. “I’m a Virgo”
    2. “Reservation Dogs”
    3. “The Bear”
    4. “Abbott Elementary”
    5. “What We Do in the Shadows”
    6. “Hacks”
    7. “Curb Your Enthusiasm”
    8. “Only Murders in the Building”

    Last year, two freshman series, “Wednesday” and “Jury Duty,” made the cut along with regulars like “The Bear,” “Only Murders in the Building” and “Abbott Elementary.” This year, that newcomer slot needs to go to “I’m a Virgo,” Boots Riley’s searing social satire about the evils of capitalism. And it streamed on Prime Video, owned by Amazon! Mmmm … that irony is delicious.

    Tracy Brown
    Los Angeles Times

    1. “Reservation Dogs”
    2. “Abbott Elementary”
    3. “The Bear”
    4. “What We Do in the Shadows”
    5. “Our Flag Means Death”
    6. “Hacks”
    7. “I’m a Virgo”
    8. “We Are Lady Parts”

    There is only one thing I need the Emmy voters to get right this year: Finally give “Reservation Dogs” the recognition it deserves. The show was fantastic throughout its entire run but its third and final season, which saw its young characters grow toward the adults they’ll become, really nailed it. It also would be great to see my favorite pirates (“Our Flag Means Death”) and Muslim punk rockers (“We Are Lady Parts”) make the cut.

    Trey Mangum
    Shadow and Act

    1. “Diarra From Detroit”
    2. “Abbott Elementary”
    3. “Gen V”
    4. “The Bear”
    5. “Ghosts”
    6. “I’m a Virgo”
    7. “Hacks”
    8. “What We Do in the Shadows”

    In our early thoughts, it’s looking like the battle of two juggernauts, “Abbott Elementary” and “The Bear.” But one of the best comedies on television that needs to be on Emmy’s watchlist is BET+’s “Diarra From Detroit,” and everyone needs to get on board. “Gen V” on Prime Video had a solid first season. “Hacks,” of course, is always great, as was the first-year thought-provoker “I’m a Virgo.”

    Matt Roush
    TV Guide

    1. “The Bear”
    2. “Abbott Elementary”
    3. “Reservation Dogs”
    4. “Hacks”
    5. “Ghosts”
    6. “What We Do in the Shadows”
    7. “Curb Your Enthusiasm”
    8. “Only Murders in the Building”

    Put aside the drama-vs.-comedy debate regarding “The Bear,” which would dominate in any field. The comedy I’d love to see get some attention after three seasons is CBS’ delightful “Ghosts,” with the sort of great ensemble cast and clever humor that used to score before network TV became invisible.

    Glenn Whipp
    Los Angeles Times

    1. “The Bear”
    2. “Abbott Elementary”
    3. “Hacks”
    4. “Reservation Dogs”
    5. “Only Murders in the Building”
    6. “Curb Your Enthusiasm”
    7. “I’m a Virgo”
    8. “The Gentlemen”

    Is a series a comedy if you’re in tears at the end of nearly every episode? Not the “I laughed so hard, I cried” kind of tears but honest-to-God weeping at the emotional heartbreak unfolding before your eyes. Does the answer even matter? No. I’m fine with another Emmy sweep for “The Bear.”

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    1. Ayo Edebiri (“The Bear”)
    2. Quinta Brunson (“Abbott Elementary”)
    3. (tie) Devery Jacobs (“Reservation Dogs”)
    3. (tie) Jean Smart (“Hacks”)
    5. (tie) Natasia Demetriou (“What We Do in the Shadows”)
    5. (tie) Diarra Kilpatrick (“Diarra From Detroit”)
    5. (tie) Kristen Wiig (“Palm Royale”)
    8. (tie) Maya Rudolph (“Loot”)
    8. (tie) Jaz Sinclair (“Gen V”)
    10. Selena Gomez (“Only Murders in the Building”)
    11. (tie) Kaley Cuoco (“Based on a True Story”)
    11. (tie) Renée Elise Goldsberry (“Girls5eva”)
    11. (tie) Michelle Yeoh (“The Brothers Sun”)

    Lead actress in a comedy series is another competitive category, with just two points of separation between the top four frontrunners. Last year’s supporting actress winner, Ayo Edebiri, who plays ambitious young chef Sydney in “The Bear,” has been promoted to lead for this second campaign and in this early round holds the slimmest of leads.

    The field also includes last year’s category winner, Quinta Brunson, the multihyphenate “Abbott Elementary” star, as well as Jean Smart of “Hacks,” who won back-to-back before the show’s health- and strike-related hiatus. Back as legendary stand-up comedian Deborah Vance, Smart “remains divine — funny, real and raw in conveying vulnerability and intelligence,” says Glenn Whipp.

    A number of panelists plead for the TV academy to finally recognize Devery Jacobs for her portrayal of Elora Danan, the moral and emotional center of the close-knit teens at the center of “Reservation Dogs.” “This WILL be the year that ‘Reservation Dogs’ gets its shamefully overdue recognition from Emmy voters,” says Kristen Baldwin.

    Trey Mangum makes the case for Diarra Kilpatrick, who “wears multiple hats on ‘Diarra From Detroit’ and knocks all of them out of the park, not only anchoring the creative behind the show but fronting it as the lead actress as well.” And Lorraine Ali insists that a nomination for “Palm Royale’s” Kristen Wiig should be a “no-brainer” for her “irresistible and hilarious [performance] as the desperate Southern beauty queen who’ll do anything to become part of the elite set in a Palm Beach country club.”

    Also on the the list are “Only Murder in the Building’s” Selena Gomez, “Loot’s” Maya Rudolph and Natasia Demetriou of “What We Do in the Shadows.”

    Lorraine Ali
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Kristen Wiig (“Palm Royale”)
    2. Devery Jacobs (“Reservation Dogs”)
    3. Quinta Brunson (“Abbott Elementary”)
    4. Ayo Edebiri (“The Bear”)
    5. Jean Smart (“Hacks”)
    6. Michelle Yeoh (“The Brothers Sun”)

    Nominating Kristen Wiig is a no-brainer if the true goal of the Emmys is to recognize the year’s best performances (naive, I know). She is irresistible and hilarious as the desperate Southern beauty queen who’ll do anything to become part of the elite set in a Palm Beach country club.

    Kristen Baldwin
    Entertainment Weekly

    1. Devery Jacobs (“Reservation Dogs”)
    2. Jean Smart (“Hacks”)
    3. Quinta Brunson (“Abbott Elementary”)
    4. Ayo Edebiri (“The Bear”)
    5. Natasia Demetriou (“What We Do in the Shadows”)
    6. Selena Gomez (“Only Murders in the Building”)

    Ayo Edebiri could very well follow her January win as supporting actress with a frontrunner spot in the lead category, where she probably should have been all along. And this WILL be the year that “Reservation Dogs” gets its shamefully overdue recognition from Emmy voters — both here and in the comedy series category.

    Tracy Brown
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Devery Jacobs (“Reservation Dogs”)
    2. Quinta Brunson (“Abbott Elementary”)
    3. Ayo Edebiri (“The Bear”)
    4. Jean Smart (“Hacks”)
    5. Natasia Demetriou (“What We Do in the Shadows”)
    6. Renée Elise Goldsberry (“Girls5eva”)

    I imagine this competitive category will be loaded with past winners Quinta Brunson (“Abbott Elementary”), Jean Smart (“Hacks”) and supporting-turned-lead Ayo Edebiri (“The Bear”) rightfully recognized again. And both Natasia Demetriou (“What We Do in the Shadows”) and Renée Elise Goldsberry (“Girls5eva”) might be long shots, but they consistently shine on shows I find laugh-out-loud funny.

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    Trey Mangum
    Shadow and Act

    1. Diarra Kilpatrick (“Diarra From Detroit”)
    2. Ayo Edebiri (“The Bear”)
    3. Jaz Sinclair (“Gen V”)
    4. Quinta Brunson (“Abbott Elementary”)
    5. Maya Rudolph (“Loot”)
    6. Jean Smart (“Hacks”)

    Just like it’s “Abbott Elementary” vs. “The Bear,” it seems like Quinta Brunson and Ayo Edebiri will be neck and neck. Diarra Kilpatrick wears multiple hats on “Diarra From Detroit” and knocks them all out of the park, not only anchoring the creative behind the show but fronting it as the lead actress as well.

    Matt Roush
    TV Guide

    1. Jean Smart (“Hacks”)
    2. Ayo Edebiri (“The Bear”)
    3. Quinta Brunson (“Abbott Elementary”)
    4. Devery Jacobs (“Reservation Dogs”)
    5. Natasia Demetriou (“What We Do in the Shadows”)
    6. Kaley Cuoco (“Based on a True Story”)

    One of the tougher toss-ups will be choosing among several Emmy winners: “Hacks’” transcendent Smart, “The Bear’s” Edebiri promoted to lead, and lauded “Abbott” creator Brunson. It would be a pleasant shock if the Emmys finally noticed “Reservation Dogs” in its final year, but for this round, we can at least hope.

    Glenn Whipp
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Jean Smart (“Hacks”)
    2. Ayo Edebiri (“The Bear”)
    3. Quinta Brunson (“Abbott Elementary”)
    4. Devery Jacobs (“Reservation Dogs”)
    5. Maya Rudolph (“Loot”)
    6. Selena Gomez (“Only Murders in the Building”)

    Between the strikes and a heart procedure for star Jean Smart, we had to wait a while for “Hacks” to return for its third season. But it’s back and Smart, fully recovered, remains divine — funny, real and raw in conveying vulnerability and intelligence.

    1. Jharrel Jerome (“I’m a Virgo”)
    2. Jeremy Allen White (“The Bear”)
    3. D’Pharaoh Woon-A-Tai (“Reservation Dogs”)
    4. Martin Short (“Only Murders in the Building”)
    5. Steve Martin (“Only Murders in the Building”)
    6. (tie) Larry David (“Curb Your Enthusiasm”)
    6. (tie) Theo James (“The Gentlemen”)
    8. (tie) Matt Berry (“What We Do in the Shadows”)
    8. (tie) Kayvan Novak (“What We Do in the Shadows”)
    10. (tie) Utkarsh Ambudkar (“Ghosts”)
    10. (tie) Drew Tarver (“The Other Two”)

    Just two of last year’s nominees are eligible this year: Jeremy Allen White, who won for his portrayal of Carmy, a classically trained chef who took over his late brother’s sandwich shop before deciding to transform it into the restaurant of their dreams in “The Bear,” and “Only Murders in the Building’s” Martin Short, who plays the self-obsessed, over-the-top director Oliver Putnam.

    Among those the panelists think should join them in this year’s race is Short’s “Murders” counterpart Steve Martin, who was nominated for his work in the show’s first season. Glenn Whipp says nominating just one half of the power couple is an “omission [that] can’t happen again.” Matt Roush agrees, saying, “Watching a panicked Steve Martin try to master a tongue-twisting musical theater song was a comedy highlight of the year.”

    Trey Mangum is among the panelists heaping praise on Jharrel Jerome — a past winner for “When They See Us” — for his portrayal of a very tall, sheltered teen in “I’m a Virgo.” “If we’re talking about sheer performance, this one should be his,” says Mangum. Kristen Baldwin also expects Jerome to “earn another nod here for his hilariously earnest performance.”

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    Among the actors Lorraine Ali is advocating for is “D’Pharaoh Woon-A-Tai for his authenticity and depth as Bear in ‘Reservation Dogs.’” “What We Do in the Shadows” duo Matt Berry and Kayvan Novak also got some shoutouts.

    “Curb Your Enthusiasm’s” Larry David and “The Gentlemen’s” Theo James also are among those who made the panelists’ list.

    Lorraine Ali
    Los Angeles Times

    1. D’Pharaoh Woon-A-Tai (“Reservation Dogs”)
    2. Jharrel Jerome (“I’m a Virgo”)
    3. Jeremy Allen White (“The Bear”)
    4. (tie) Larry David (“Curb Your Enthusiasm”)
    4. (tie) Martin Short (“Only Murders in the Building”)
    6. Utkarsh Ambudkar (“Ghosts”)

    D’Pharaoh Woon-A-Tai for his authenticity and depth as Bear in “Reservation Dogs.” Jharrel Jerome for his outsize performance in “I’m a Virgo.” Martin Short for bringing the insufferable ego of Oliver to life in “Only Murders in the Building.” And Jeremy Allen White for being so likable in “The Bear,” even though it’s not a comedy.

    Kristen Baldwin
    Entertainment Weekly

    1. Jharrel Jerome (“I’m a Virgo”)
    2. Jeremy Allen White (“The Bear”)
    3. D’Pharaoh Woon-A-Tai (“Reservation Dogs”)
    4. Matt Berry (“What We Do in the Shadows”)
    5. Kayvan Novak (“What We Do in the Shadows”)
    6. Drew Tarver (“The Other Two”)

    In my dream world, voters would eschew knee-jerk nominations for the Old White Guy trifecta (Steve Martin, Martin Short, Larry David) and give those slots to deserving Emmy newbies D’Pharoah Woon-A-Tai, Matt Berry and Kayvan Novak. In reality, though, Emmy winner Jharrel Jerome will earn another nod here for his hilariously earnest performance in “I’m a Virgo.”

    Tracy Brown
    Los Angeles Times

    1. D’Pharaoh Woon-A-Tai (“Reservation Dogs”)
    2. Jharrel Jerome (“I’m a Virgo”)
    3. Jeremy Allen White (“The Bear”)
    4. Kayvan Novak (“What We Do in the Shadows”)
    5. Matt Berry (“What We Do in the Shadows”)
    6. Utkarsh Ambudkar (“Ghosts”)

    Is there room in this category for both Kayvan Novak and Matt Berry from “What We Do in the Shadows”? There should be. I’d also love to see D’Pharaoh Woon-A-Tai and Jharrel Jerome be recognized for their earnest performances in “Reservation Dogs” and “I’m a Virgo,” respectively.

    Trey Mangum
    Shadow and Act

    1. Jharrel Jerome (“I’m a Virgo”)
    2. Jeremy Allen White (“The Bear”)
    3. Theo James (“The Gentlemen”)
    4. Drew Tarver (“The Other Two”)
    5. Utkarsh Ambudkar (“Ghosts”)
    6. Martin Short (“Only Murders in the Building”)

    It’s time to polish another Emmy for Jharrel Jerome, because if we’re talking about sheer performance this one should be his. But, of course, there’s Jeremy Allen White in this category, and overcoming “The Bear” is not going to be easy.

    Matt Roush
    TV Guide

    1. Jeremy Allen White (“The Bear”)
    2. Steve Martin (“Only Murders in the Building”)
    3. Jharrel Jerome (“I’m a Virgo”)
    4. Martin Short (“Only Murders in the Building”)
    5. Larry David (“Curb Your Enthusiasm”)
    6. Theo James (“The Gentlemen”)

    Watching a panicked Steve Martin try to master a tongue-twisting musical theater song was a comedy highlight of the year, and it’s too easy to take for granted the mastery of veteran talents like the “Only Murders in the Building” stars and, in the so-so reboot of a classic, “Frasier’s” Kelsey Grammer.

    Glenn Whipp
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Jeremy Allen White (“The Bear”)
    2. Martin Short (“Only Murders in the Building”)
    3. Jharrel Jerome (“I’m a Virgo”)
    4. Steve Martin (“Only Murders in the Building”)
    5. Larry David (“Curb Your Enthusiasm”)
    6. Theo James (“The Gentlemen”)

    I still don’t understand how voters nominated Martin Short for the second season of “Only Murders in the Building” but left Steve Martin out in the cold. They’re a team, like PB&J, mac and cheese, SpongeBob and Patrick. That omission can’t happen again.

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    1. Sheryl Lee Ralph (“Abbott Elementary”)
    2. Janelle James (“Abbott Elementary”)
    3. Hannah Einbinder (“Hacks”)
    4. Lisa Ann Walter (“Abbott Elementary”)
    5. (tie) Paulina Alexis (“Reservation Dogs”)
    5. (tie) Meryl Streep (“Only Murders in the Building”)
    7. (tie) Abby Elliott (“The Bear”)
    7. (tie) Allison Janney (“Palm Royale”)
    9. (tie) Carol Burnett (“Palm Royale”)
    9. (tie) Claudia Logan (“Diarra From Detroit”)
    11. (tie) Liza Colón-Zayas (“The Bear”)
    11. (tie) Michaela Jaé Rodriguez (“Loot”)
    13. Susie Essman (“Curb Your Enthusiasm”)
    14. Paula Pell (“Girls5eva”)
    15. Kaya Scodelario (“The Gentlemen”)
    16. Ego Nwodim (“Saturday Night Live”)

    With previous winner Ayo Edebiri getting promoted to lead, “Abbott Elementary” duo Sheryl Lee Ralph and Janelle James are the only remaining contenders from last year’s batch of nominees. Ralph won in 2022 for her portrayal of the faithful veteran kindergarten teacher Barbara Howard. James is a fan favorite for her portrayal of outrageous principal Ava Coleman.

    The panelists expect “Abbott” castmate Lisa Ann Walters also will get recognized this year. “Any ranking of these talented women is silly,” says Glenn Whipp. “They’re all superb in the series and deserving of the love sure to come their way.”

    Kristen Baldwin is among the panelists hoping to “manifest a nomination for “Reservation Dogs’” Paulina Alexis, “who was so endearingly eccentric as Willie Jack.” Matt Roush is pushing for “Only Murders in the Building’s” “sublime Meryl Streep” and “Curb Your Enthusiasm’s” Susie Essman, while Trey Mangum would “love to see” Michaela Jaé Rodriguez in contention for her work on “Loot.”

    A pair from “Palm Royale” get the support of Lorraine Ali. “With just one eye roll or grunt, [Carol Burnett’s] comedic genius is apparent,” says Ali, adding, “Allison Janney’s love affair with a beached whale in the series also deserves some Emmy love.”

    With the return of “Hacks,” panelists expect Hannah Einbinder will be among the nominees again. “This could be the year she actually takes it,” says Mangum.

    “The Bear’s” Abby Elliott and Liza Colón-Zayas, as well as “Diarra From Detroit’s” Claudia Logan, also are among the 16 names that made the panelists’ list.

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    Lorraine Ali
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Allison Janney (“Palm Royale”)
    2. Janelle James (“Abbott Elementary”)
    3. Sheryl Lee Ralph (“Abbott Elementary”)
    4. Paulina Alexis (“Reservation Dogs”)
    5. Carol Burnett (“Palm Royale”)
    6. Susie Essman (“Curb Your Enthusiasm”)
    7. (tie) Hannah Einbinder (“Hacks”)
    7. (tie) Meryl Streep (“Only Murders in the Building”)

    Carol Burnett rarely speaks in “Palm Royale,” but with just one eye roll or grunt, her comedic genius is apparent. Allison Janney’s love affair with a beached whale in the series also deserves some Emmy love. Then there’s “Abbott Elementary’s” Janelle James (Sheryl Lee Ralph is a past winner), Susie Essman of “Curb Your Enthusiasm” (“Shut up, Larry!”) and Hannah Einbinder of “Hacks.”

    Kristen Baldwin
    Entertainment Weekly

    1. Janelle James (“Abbott Elementary”)
    2. Hannah Einbinder (“Hacks”)
    3. Sheryl Lee Ralph (“Abbott Elementary”)
    4. Abby Elliott (“The Bear”)
    5. Paulina Alexis (“Reservation Dogs”)
    6. Lisa Ann Walter (“Abbott Elementary”)
    7. Liza Colón-Zayas (“The Bear”)
    8. Meryl Streep (“Only Murders in the Building”)

    The absence of “Ted Lasso” and “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” frees up several slots in the category, which will be good news for the supporting players in “Abbott Elementary” and “The Bear.” Let’s also manifest a nomination for “Reservation Dogs’” Paulina Alexis, who was so endearingly eccentric as Willie Jack.

    Tracy Brown
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Paulina Alexis (“Reservation Dogs”)
    2. Janelle James (“Abbott Elementary”)
    3. Sheryl Lee Ralph (“Abbott Elementary”)
    4. Lisa Ann Walter (“Abbott Elementary”)
    5. Hannah Einbinder (“Hacks”)
    6. Michaela Jaé Rodriguez (“Loot”)
    7. Paula Pell (“Girls5eva”)
    8. Ego Nwodim (“Saturday Night Live”)

    The women of “Abbott Elementary” should have a strong showing in this category, and I think it’s time Lisa Ann Walter to get a nod for portraying the no-nonsense Melissa Schemmenti. I’m also rooting for “Reservation Dogs’” Paulina Alexis, whose Willie Jack had one of my favorite arcs in the series as the teen who finds her way through tradition and community.

    Trey Mangum
    Shadow and Act

    1. Claudia Logan (“Diarra From Detroit”)
    2. Sheryl Lee Ralph (“Abbott Elementary”)
    3. Janelle James (“Abbott Elementary”)
    4. Lisa Ann Walter (“Abbott Elementary”)
    5. Michaela Jaé Rodriguez (“Loot”)
    6. Hannah Einbinder (“Hacks”)
    7. Liza Colón-Zayas (“The Bear”)
    8. Meryl Streep (“Only Murders in the Building”)

    The “Abbott Elementary” trifecta of Janelle James, Sheryl Lee Ralph and Lisa Ann Walter are the it girls in this category once again. Of the three, I’m leaning toward Ralph as the standout. Hannah Einbinder from “Hacks” always inches toward upset territory — this could be the year she actually takes it. One person I’d love to see in contention is Michaela Jaé Rodriguez for what she does in “Loot” on Apple TV+.

    Matt Roush
    TV Guide

    1. Hannah Einbinder (“Hacks”)
    2. Sheryl Lee Ralph (“Abbott Elementary”)
    3. Meryl Streep (“Only Murders in the Building”)
    4. Janelle James (“Abbott Elementary”)
    5. Carol Burnett (“Palm Royale”)
    6. Susie Essman (“Curb Your Enthusiasm”)
    7. Paula Pell (“Girls5eva”)
    8. Lisa Ann Walter (“Abbott Elementary”)

    You know a show missed its mark when you have to think twice about whether to include a comedy legend like “Palm Royale’s” poorly used Carol Burnett. No such hesitation for “Only Murders in the Building’s” sublime Meryl Streep. And who wouldn’t want to hear “Curb’s” Susie Essman erupt on the Emmy stage?

    Glenn Whipp
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Meryl Streep (“Only Murders in the Building”)
    2. Sheryl Lee Ralph (“Abbott Elementary”)
    3. Lisa Ann Walter (“Abbott Elementary”)
    4. Hannah Einbinder (“Hacks”)
    5. Abby Elliott (“The Bear”)
    6. Liza Colón-Zayas (“The Bear”)
    7. Kaya Scodelario (“The Gentlemen”)
    8. Janelle James (“Abbott Elementary”)

    Sheryl Lee Ralph won an Emmy for the first season of “Abbott Elementary,” and she’s sure to be nominated here again, along with castmates Lisa Ann Walter and Janelle James. Any ranking of these talented women is silly. They’re all superb in the series and deserving of the love sure to come their way.

    1. Tyler James Williams (“Abbott Elementary”)
    2. Ebon Moss-Bachrach (“The Bear”)
    3. Lionel Boyce (“The Bear”)
    4. Lane Factor (“Reservation Dogs”)
    5. Chris Perfetti (“Abbott Elementary”)
    6. Walton Goggins (“I’m a Virgo”)
    7. Harvey Guillén (“What We Do in the Shadows”)
    8. Oliver Platt (“The Bear”)
    9. Bowen Yang (“Saturday Night Live”)
    10. Kenan Thompson (“Saturday Night Live”)
    11. Chance Perdomo (“Gen V”)
    12. Paul Rudd (“Only Murders in the Building”)
    13. Richard Lewis (“Curb Your Enthusiasm”)
    14. (tie) Carl Clemons-Hopkins (“Hacks”)
    14. (tie) Daniel Ings (“The Gentlemen”)
    14. (tie) Matty Matheson (“The Bear”)
    17. (tie) William Stanford Davis (“Abbott Elementary”)
    17. (tie) Paul W. Downs (“Hacks”)
    19. Joel Kim Booster (“Loot”)

    With the conclusion of shows like “Ted Lasso” and “Barry,” this is another race where only two nominees from last year are eligible this year: “Abbott Elementary’s” Tyler James Williams, who has been nominated twice for his portrayal of substitute-turned-full-time first grade teacher Gregory Eddie, and “The Bear’s” Ebon Moss-Bachrach, who won last year for his portrayal of the abrasive but faithful Richie.

    “Moss-Bachrach invests so much of himself into this flawed, loyal, loving character,” says Glenn Whipp. Matt Roush asks, “Can anything stop a second sweep of ‘The Bear’?”

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    Trey Mangum is pushing for Moss-Bachrach’s “The Bear” castmate Lionel Boyce as well as “Gen V’s” “secret weapon,” Chance Perdomo, to get noticed. Kristen Baldwin shouts out “Joel Kim Booster as Maya Rudolph’s narcissistic bestie in ‘Loot’; Chris Perfetti as ‘Abbott Elementary’s’ endearingly anxious Jacob; and Marcello Hernandez, whose manic charm makes him ‘SNL’s’ most valuable featured player.”

    Lane Factor of “Reservation Dogs” also has the support of panelists. Lorraine Ali says, “As Cheese, [Factor] embodied the hopes and aspirations of the teens we followed from high school to the brink of adulthood, anchoring the crew with empathy, humor and depth.”

    Also deserving of notice, says Roush, are “What We Do in the Shadows’” Harvey Guillén, “Only Murders in the Building’s” Paul Rudd and “Curb Your Enthusiasm’s” Richard Lewis. “I’m a Virgo’s” Walton Goggins also gets a mention here, meaning he could potentially be a double nominee this year.

    Also among the 19 actors the panelists touted are “The Bear’s” Oliver Platt and Matty Matheson, “Abbott Elementary’s” William Stanford Davis, “SNL’s” Bowen Yang and Kenan Thompson and “Hacks’“ Carl Clemons-Hopkins and Paul W. Downs.

    Lorraine Ali
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Lane Factor (“Reservation Dogs”)
    2. Bowen Yang (“Saturday Night Live”)
    3. (tie) Lionel Boyce (“The Bear”)
    3. (tie) Kenan Thompson (“Saturday Night Live”)
    5. (tie) Walton Goggins (“I’m a Virgo”)
    5. (tie) Daniel Ings (“The Gentlemen”)
    7. (tie) Ebon Moss-Bachrach (“The Bear”)
    7. (tie) Oliver Platt (“The Bear”)

    One of the more understated performances of the year came from Lane Factor of “Reservation Dogs.” As Cheese, he embodied the hopes and aspirations of the teens we followed from high school to the brink of adulthood, anchoring the crew with empathy, humor and depth.

    Kristen Baldwin
    Entertainment Weekly

    1. Ebon Moss-Bachrach (“The Bear”)
    2. Walton Goggins (“I’m a Virgo”)
    3. Tyler James Williams (“Abbott Elementary”)
    4. Oliver Platt (“The Bear”)
    5. Lionel Boyce (“The Bear”)
    6. Kenan Thompson (“Saturday Night Live”)
    7. Paul W. Downs (“Hacks”)
    8. Harvey Guillén (“What We Do in the Shadows”)

    A few shoutouts for the folks who probably won’t make it onto the ballot but gave great performances nonetheless: Joel Kim Booster as Maya Rudolph’s narcissistic bestie in “Loot”; Chris Perfetti as “Abbott Elementary’s” endearingly anxious Jacob; and Marcello Hernandez, whose manic charm makes him “SNL’s” most valuable featured player.

    Tracy Brown
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Lane Factor (“Reservation Dogs”)
    2. Tyler James Williams (“Abbott Elementary”)
    3. Harvey Guillén (“What We Do in the Shadows”)
    4. Chris Perfetti (“Abbott Elementary”)
    5. Lionel Boyce (“The Bear”)
    6. Walton Goggins (“I’m a Virgo”)
    7. Ebon Moss-Bachrach (“The Bear”)
    8. Joel Kim Booster (“Loot”)

    Besides some familiar faces from “Abbott Elementary” and “The Bear” getting repeat nods, Walton Goggins might pull off a double nomination this year between “Fallout” and “I’m a Virgo.” But one of my favorite performances is Lane Factor as the lovable elder whisperer Cheese in “Reservation Dogs.”

    Trey Mangum
    Shadow and Act

    1. Tyler James Williams (“Abbott Elementary”)
    2. Chance Perdomo (“Gen V”)
    3. Lionel Boyce (“The Bear”)
    4. Chris Perfetti (“Abbott Elementary”)
    5. Ebon Moss-Bachrach (“The Bear”)
    6. Carl Clemons-Hopkins (“Hacks”)
    7. William Stanford Davis (“Abbott Elementary”)
    8. Kenan Thompson (“Saturday Night Live”)

    From “Chilling Adventures of Sabrina” to now, Chance Perdomo was always a secret weapon to the projects he was part of, and a posthumous nod for Prime Video’s “Gen V” would be an amazing sendoff. Also, one potential nominee I’m liking right now who seems to be generating a lot of buzz is Lionel Boyce for “The Bear.”

    Matt Roush
    TV Guide

    1. Ebon Moss-Bachrach (“The Bear”)
    2. Harvey Guillén (“What We Do in the Shadows”)
    3. Paul Rudd (“Only Murders in the Building”)
    4. Tyler James Williams (“Abbott Elementary”)
    5. Bowen Yang (“Saturday Night Live”)
    6. Lionel Boyce (“The Bear”)
    7. Richard Lewis (“Curb Your Enthusiasm”)
    8. Walton Goggins (“I’m a Virgo”)

    Can anything stop a second sweep for “The Bear”? Probably not, but Harvey Guillén as “Shadows’” not-quite-vampire deserves notice, as does Paul Rudd’s deliciously deserving “Murders” victim. And a posthumous nomination for “Curb’s” Richard Lewis as Larry David’s best friend and foil would be a memorable tribute to a terrific talent.

    Glenn Whipp
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Ebon Moss-Bachrach (“The Bear”)
    2. Tyler James Williams (“Abbott Elementary”)
    3. Chris Perfetti (“Abbott Elementary”)
    4. Oliver Platt (“The Bear”)
    5. Lionel Boyce (“The Bear”)
    6. Matty Matheson (“The Bear”)
    7. Richard Lewis (“Curb Your Enthusiasm”)
    8. Walton Goggins (“I’m a Virgo”)

    My favorite episode of “The Bear” is, hands-down, “Forks,” in which we follow Ebon Moss-Bachrach’s impulsive Richie to a fancy restaurant where he learns the value of showing up, as well as a well-timed slice of deep-dish Pequod’s Pizza. Moss-Bachrach invests so much of himself into this flawed, loyal, loving character. I was spellbound watching.

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    Two law enforcement officers in heavy parkas shine flashlights into an encampment
    Kali Reis, left, and Jodie Foster star in “True Detective: Night Country.”
    (Michele K. Short / HBO)

    1. “True Detective: Night Country”
    2. “Fellow Travelers”
    3. “Ripley”
    4. “Fargo”
    5. “Baby Reindeer”
    6. (tie) “Echo”
    6. (tie) “Lessons in Chemistry”
    8. (tie) “Expats”
    8. (tie) “Genius: MLK/X”
    10. (tie) “A Murder at the End of the World”
    10. (tie) “The Sympathizer”
    12. (tie) “Feud: Capote vs. the Swans”
    12. (tie) “Masters of the Air”
    14. “Mary & George”

    The great “Shōgun” switcheroo also rocked the limited-series race, but with only five possible nominees, the field remains competitive with 14 shows getting mentions from the panelists.

    Showrunner Issá Lopez’s Alaska-set “True Detective: Night Country,” starring Jodie Foster and Kali Reis, has been hailed as one of the anthology series’ best seasons (sorry, Nic Pizzolatto) and is among the frontrunners. The latest installment of “Fargo” has been similarly praised as a “comeback season.” “Fargo” previously won this category in 2014 for its first season (its second and third seasons also earned nods), while the first season of “True Detective” was nominated as a drama series the same year.

    Multiple panelists also rallied behind a pair of literary adaptations. One is “Ripley,” based on the 1955 Patricia Highsmith novel, starring Andrew Scott as the eponymous sociopath who takes over the life of a trust-fund kid. Glenn Whipp says the “riveting” show is “gorgeous to behold and a marvel in its plotting.”

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    The other is “Fellow Travelers,” based on Thomas Mallon’s 2007 novel about two men who meet at the height of the McCarthy era and their secret, decades-long romance. The series “deserves to break through for its fascinating window into America’s troubled and closeted past,” says Matt Roush.

    Trey Mangum notes that the buzzy and unsettling “Baby Reindeer,” based on creator Richard Gadd’s one-man autobiographical show, “has been racking up the attention for some time now,” which could translate to some love from Emmy voters. Kristen Baldwin thinks the “star-studded ‘Feud: Capote vs. the Swans’ could … squeak in.”

    Lorraine Ali
    Los Angeles Times

    1. “True Detective: Night Country”
    2. (tie) “Fellow Travelers”
    2. (tie) “Ripley”
    4. “Fargo”
    5. “Feud: Capote vs. the Swans”

    It’s another strong year for limited series. Netflix series adaptation “Ripley” is certain to be nominated. “True Detective: Night Country” is also a likely contender, and not just because it’s my favorite installation of the creepy HBO anthology series. Less likely but worth a nod is “Fellow Travelers,” Showtime’s political saga that follows a clandestine romance between two men from the height of the McCarthy era to the 1980s AIDS crisis.

    Kristen Baldwin
    Entertainment Weekly

    1. “True Detective: Night Country”
    2. “Fargo”
    3. “Ripley”
    4. “Baby Reindeer”
    5. “Feud: Capote vs. the Swans”

    With “Shōgun” graduating to drama, Netflix’s word-of-mouth hit “Baby Reindeer” is now the frontrunner. FX’s star-studded “Feud: Capote vs. the Swans” could still squeak in here, but it probably will have to settle for nominations in the acting categories.

    Tracy Brown
    Los Angeles Times

    1. “Echo”
    2. “True Detective: Night Country”
    3. “A Murder at the End of the World”
    4. “Fellow Travelers”
    5. “The Sympathizer”

    I tend to like my fictional murder mysteries and amateur sleuths to be a bit lighter, but “A Murder at the End of the World” successfully pulled me in. A gay love story wrapped up in a history lesson, “Fellow Travelers” is on that prestige end of queer storytelling that draws on the devastating reality that LGBTQ+ people have had to live through in this country.

    Trey Mangum
    Shadow and Act

    1. “Fellow Travelers”
    2. “Genius: MLK/X”
    3. “Lessons in Chemistry”
    4. “True Detective: Night Country”
    5. “Mary & George”

    “Baby Reindeer” has been racking up the attention for some time now, but we aren’t really sure if it’ll translate into awards love just yet. Until then, it’s “Fellow Travelers” for me, especially if “Shōgun” is now in the drama series category.

    Matt Roush
    TV Guide

    1. “Fellow Travelers”
    2. “Fargo”
    3. “True Detective: Night Country”
    4. “The Sympathizer”
    5. “Lessons in Chemistry”

    Of all categories to limit to five picks, this is the worst. The limited series is where much of TV’s best work is being produced, and in a crowded field, Showtime’s Peabody-winning “Fellow Travelers” deserves to break through for its fascinating window into America’s troubled and closeted past. “Fargo” and “True Detective” each enjoyed comeback seasons.

    Glenn Whipp
    Los Angeles Times

    1. “Ripley”
    2. “Expats”
    3. “Baby Reindeer”
    4. “Masters of the Air”
    5. “Lessons in Chemistry”

    “Ripley” is riveting in delivering slow-burn suspense, following its titular sociopath on a quest to extend his European vacation and live a life of luxury. Gorgeous to behold and a marvel in its plotting, I can only hope it makes good on its open-ended promise to return for another season.

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    1. “Red, White and Royal Blue”
    2. “Scoop”
    3. “Quiz Lady”
    4. “Mr. Monk’s Last Case: A Monk Movie”
    5. “No One Will Save You”
    6. “Shooting Stars”
    7. “Música”
    8. “The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial”
    9. “Good Burger 2”

    Can Mr. Monk solve the mystery of what killed the television movie? Never mind, the TV movie category is still kicking and may outlive us all.

    Sidestepping the question of what a television movie even is, the frontrunners according to the panelists include “Red, White and Royal Blue,” a frothy gay rom-com involving the son of a U.S. president and a British prince, and “Quiz Lady,” a road-trip buddy comedy about a pair of estranged sisters.

    But, says Trey Mangum, “‘Mr. Monk’s Last Case: A Monk Movie’ should absolutely be seen as a title that could come through and take it.” Matt Roush, meanwhile, says the TV movie that stuck with him is the “harrowing ‘No One Will Save You’ with its masterful use of silence.” And Lorraine Ali is “pulling for ‘Shooting Stars,’ a basketball superhero origin story based on the book by LeBron James and author Buzz Bissinger.”

    Among the titles that also made the panelists’ list: “Scoop,” which tells the story behind how Prince Andrew’s interview about his associations with Jeffrey Epstein came together; the musical coming-of-age rom-com “Música”; and the wacky comedy sketch-based sequel “Good Burger 2.”

    (And for the record, according to the Television Academy’s rules, “A television movie is defined as an original program, which tells a story with a beginning, middle and end, and is broadcast/streamed in one part with a minimum running time of 75 minutes.”)

    Lorraine Ali
    Los Angeles Times

    1. “Red, White and Royal Blue”
    2. “Shooting Stars”
    3. (tie) “Mr. Monk’s Last Case: A Monk Movie”
    3. (tie) “Quiz Lady”
    3. (tie) “Scoop”

    This category is always befuddling. Using the term “TV movie” in 2024 is like calling the internet the World Wide Web. But if I must comment, I’m pulling for “Shooting Stars,” a basketball superhero origin story based on the book by LeBron James and author Buzz Bissinger. Otherwise it’s anyone’s guess.

    Kristen Baldwin
    Entertainment Weekly

    1. “Mr. Monk’s Last Case: A Monk Movie”
    2. “Scoop”
    3. “Quiz Lady”
    4. “Good Burger 2”
    5. “Red, White and Royal Blue”

    Honestly, I just can’t get excited about this category. Wouldn’t it be way more interesting (and timely) if the Emmys chose to recognize the very specific art of naming basic-cable holiday movies? So many contenders from the 2023 season alone: “Never Been Chris’d”! “Catch Me If You Claus”! “We’re Scrooged”! “Yuletide the Knot”! “Twas the Text Before Christmas”!

    Tracy Brown
    Los Angeles Times

    1. “Red, White and Royal Blue”
    2. “Quiz Lady”
    3. “Scoop”
    4. “No One Will Save You”
    5. “Música”

    This category is always the hardest for me to wrap my head around unless we are talking made-for-TV movies of a bygone era. “Quiz Lady” is fun and funny, particularly the always terrific Sandra Oh. And who doesn’t love a frothy gay rom-com? (Don’t answer that.) “Red, White and Royal Blue” doesn’t break any new ground, but that’s profound in its own way.

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    Trey Mangum
    Shadow and Act

    1. “Red, White and Royal Blue”
    2. “Shooting Stars”
    3. “Música”
    4. “Mr. Monk’s Last Case: A Monk Movie”
    5. “Quiz Lady”

    The television movie category is always the one that could truly go either way, and this year that sentiment couldn’t be any stronger. “Red, White and Royal Blue” is the pic that seems to have both critic and viewer love, so I can’t see a world where this isn’t our winner. “Quiz Lady” could provide some competition, but “Mr. Monk’s Last Case: A Monk Movie” should absolutely be seen as a title that could come through and take it.

    Matt Roush
    TV Guide

    1. “Scoop”
    2. “No One Will Save You”
    3. “The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial”
    4. “Quiz Lady”
    5. “Mr. Monk’s Last Case: A Monk Movie”

    As usual, not much to say about the anemic crop of made-for-TV movies, Given its Emmy history, the final (so they say) “Monk” movie is a sure bet to be nominated, but the only candidate that stuck with me was Hulu’s harrowing “No One Will Save You” with its masterful use of silence.

    Glenn Whipp
    Los Angeles Times

    1. “Red, White and Royal Blue”
    2. “Scoop”
    3. “No One Will Save You”
    4. “Mr. Monk’s Last Case: A Monk Movie”
    5. “Quiz Lady”

    “Red, White & Royal Blue” is sweet, funny froth, a rom-com about a love affair between the son of an American president (Uma Thurman, sporting a gloriously awful Southern accent) and a British prince. Talk about a fantasy! And people were talking about this fantasy all through the end of last summer. Hey, sometimes beach reads deserve awards too.

    1. Jodie Foster (“True Detective: Night Country”)
    2. Juno Temple (“Fargo”)
    3. Brie Larson (“Lessons in Chemistry”)
    4. Naomi Watts (“Feud: Capote vs. the Swans”)
    5. Annie Murphy (“Black Mirror”)
    6. (tie) Emma Corrin (“A Murder at the End of the World”)
    6. (tie) Sofia Vergara (“Griselda”)
    8. (tie) Alaqua Cox (“Echo”)
    8. (tie) Nicole Kidman (“Expats”)
    8. (tie) Julianne Moore (“Mary & George”)
    11. Ji-young Yoo (“Expats”)
    12. (tie) Carla Gugino (“Fall of the House of Usher”)
    12. (tie) Kate Winslet (“The Regime”)

    Academy Award winners and nominees account for about half of those who made the panel’s cut for lead actress in a limited series or movie. Although there is not much consensus among the panelists, the current frontrunner is Jodie Foster, who portrays the grizzled police chief investigating the disappearance of a group of scientists in “True Detective: Night Country.”

    Also ahead of the pack is Juno Temple, who was nominated for three acting Emmys over the course of “Ted Lasso’s” run. In “Fargo,” Temple plays a Midwestern housewife with a secret past, and “she’s never been better,” says Glenn Whipp.

    No matter your feelings on “Feud: Capote vs. the Swans,” “Naomi Watts was fantastic,” says Lorraine Ali. Watts portrayed Babe Paley, a socialite who had been friends with Truman Capote. Trey Mangum, on the other hand, says he’s “ still completely obsessed with Annie Murphy, the shining light of the most recent season of ‘Black Mirror.’”

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    While Matt Roush thinks “The Regime” “fumbled” its attempt at satire, he does commend Kate Winslet for being fully committed “to her ridiculous and flamboyant character,” a chancellor of a crumbling authoritarian regime. Kristen Baldwin pushes for “Fall of the House of Usher’s” Carla Gugino to be recognized for being “so elegantly eerie as the malevolent spirit Verna.”

    Brie Larson, who portrays a scientist turned cooking show host on “Lessons in Chemistry,” and Emma Corrin, who plays an amateur detective in “A Murder at the End of the World,” also are among those who made the list.

    Lorraine Ali
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Jodie Foster (“True Detective: Night Country”)
    2. Juno Temple (“Fargo”)
    3. Naomi Watts (“Feud: Capote vs. the Swans”)
    4. (tie) Carla Gugino (“Fall of the House of Usher”)
    4. (tie) Julianne Moore (“Mary & George”)

    Here’s what should happen: Jodie Foster is nominated for her portrayal as the grizzled and emotionally stunted detective Liz Danvers in “True Detective: Night Country” (true perfection). Juno Temple is recognized for her stellar performance as a mild-mannered soccer mom with a brutal secret in “Fargo.” And in “Feud: Capote vs. the Swans,” Naomi Watts was fantastic (even if the series wasn’t).

    Kristen Baldwin
    Entertainment Weekly

    1. Jodie Foster (“True Detective: Night Country”)
    2. Naomi Watts (“Feud: Capote vs. the Swans”)
    3. Juno Temple (“Fargo”)
    4. Brie Larson (“Lessons in Chemistry”)
    5. Sofia Vergara (“Griselda”)

    I don’t have Kate Winslet on my list, even though she’s for sure going to get nominated for HBO’s disappointing mess “The Regime.” Instead, let’s give that hypothetical slot to Carla Gugino, so elegantly eerie as the malevolent spirit Verna in Netflix’s otherwise silly “Fall of the House of Usher.”

    Tracy Brown
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Jodie Foster (“True Detective: Night Country”)
    2. Emma Corrin (“A Murder at the End of the World”)
    3. Alaqua Cox (“Echo”)
    4. Sofia Vergara (“Griselda”)
    5. Ji-young Yoo (“Expats”)

    Jodie Foster is Jodie Foster, and the latest “True Detective,” in which she played a police chief in Alaska, is the best the anthology series has been in a while. Also great was Emma Corrin as the captivating hacker-sleuth in “A Murder at the End of the World.”

    Trey Mangum
    Shadow and Act

    1. Annie Murphy (“Black Mirror”)
    2. Brie Larson (“Lessons in Chemistry”)
    3. Jodie Foster (“True Detective: Night Country”)
    4. Julianne Moore (“Mary & George”)
    5. Sofia Vergara (“Griselda”)

    Maybe it’s just me, but I’m still completely obsessed with Annie Murphy, the shining light of the most recent season of ‘Black Mirror.’ Also, ‘Mary & George’ is another show that needs to be talked about more, and a lot of that is due to some of the things that Julianne More is doing this season.

    Matt Roush
    TV Guide

    1. Juno Temple (“Fargo”)
    2. Jodie Foster (“True Detective: Night Country”)
    3. Brie Larson (“Lessons in Chemistry”)
    4. Naomi Watts (“Feud: Capote vs. the Swans”)
    5. Kate Winslet (“The Regime”)

    Some heavy hitters in this field, with Oscar winners Jodie Foster (‘True Detective’) and Brie Larson (‘Lessons in Chemistry’) among the presumed front-runners. Juno Temple was a delight as ‘Fargo’s’ resourceful heroine, and while ‘The Regime’ fumbled its political satire, Kate Winslet committed fully to her ridiculous and flamboyant character.

    Glenn Whipp
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Juno Temple (“Fargo”)
    2. Jodie Foster (“True Detective: Night Country”)
    3. Nicole Kidman (“Expats”)
    4. Brie Larson (“Lessons in Chemistry”)
    5. Ji-young Yoo (“Expats”)

    I’m quite familiar with Juno Temple, having watched her since she began her career as a teenager and, of course, captured everyone’s hearts in ‘Ted Lasso.’ And yet, it took me a minute watching the new season of ‘Fargo’ to clock it was indeed Temple playing this cheery Midwestern woman hiding a secret past. She’s never been better.

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    1. Matt Bomer (“Fellow Travelers”)
    2. Andrew Scott (“Ripley”)
    3. Tom Hollander (“Feud: Capote vs. the Swans”)
    4. (tie) Jon Hamm (“Fargo”)
    4. (tie) Kelvin Harrison Jr. (“Genius: MLK/X”)
    4. (tie) Ewan McGregor (“A Gentleman in Moscow”)
    7. Aaron Pierre (“Genius: MLK/X”)
    8. (tie) Richard Gadd (“Baby Reindeer”)
    8. (tie) Hoa Xuande (“The Sympathizer”)
    10. Luke James (“Them: The Scare”)
    11. Tony Shalhoub (“Mr. Monk’s Last Case: A Monk Movie”)
    12. (tie) Austin Butler (“Masters of the Air”)
    12. (tie) David Oyelowo (“Lawmen: Bass Reeves”)

    There was not one consensus pick among the contenders for lead actor in a limited series or movie, but Matt Bomer came the closest, with a number of panelists noting that his portrayal of a closeted bureaucrat in “Fellow Travelers” is a career high. A past Emmy nominee, Bomer already was nominated for a SAG Award for this performance.

    Among those whom Matt Roush shouts out is Tom Hollander for his “convincing impersonation of the self-destructive Truman Capote” in “Feud: Capote vs. the Swans.” Glenn Whipp also commends him for “capturing the writer’s tragic flaws and winning charm.”

    Trey Mangum advocates for “the dynamic duo” of Kelvin Harrison Jr. and Aaron Pierre, who he says “are outstanding as their respective historical figures in ‘Genius: MLK/X.’” Kristen Baldwin, meanwhile, notes that it’s inevitable that Tony Shalhoub will get a nomination for reprising the title obsessive-compulsive sleuth in “Mr. Monk’s Last Case: A Monk Movie.”

    Jon Hamm, who plays “Fargo’s” creepy, villainous sheriff, also was praised by a number of panelists. “He’s wonderfully terrifying,” says Lorraine Ali. But speaking of wonderfully terrifying, Ali also notes that “Ripley’s” Andrew Scott “is the one to beat.”

    Lorraine Ali
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Andrew Scott (“Ripley”)
    2. (tie) Matt Bomer (“Fellow Travelers”)
    2. (tie) Jon Hamm (“Fargo”)
    4. Ewan McGregor (“A Gentleman in Moscow”)

    It’s scary how convincing Jon Hamm is as a cult leader (remember “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”?), and he does it again in “Fargo.” But this time around he’s wonderfully terrifying. Matt Bomer, on the other hand, exudes the suave sexiness and bottled dysfunction of Don Draper in “Fellow Travelers.” But Andrew Scott of “Ripley” is the one to beat.

    Kristen Baldwin
    Entertainment Weekly

    1. Andrew Scott (“Ripley”)
    2. Tom Hollander (“Feud: Capote vs. the Swans”)
    3. Matt Bomer (“Fellow Travelers”)
    4. Richard Gadd (“Baby Reindeer”)
    5. Tony Shalhoub (“Mr. Monk’s Last Case: A Monk Movie”)

    Honestly, I never watched “Monk” or “Mr. Monk’s Last Case,” but when voters have an opportunity to nominate the wonderful Tony Shalhoub for something, they should. Can you even imagine an Emmy ballot without him? (Don’t answer that.)

    Tracy Brown
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Matt Bomer (“Fellow Travelers”)
    2. Hoa Xuande (“The Sympathizer”)
    3. Andrew Scott (“Ripley”)
    4. Kelvin Harrison Jr. (“Genius: MLK/X”)
    5. Aaron Pierre (“Genius: MLK/X”)

    Andrew Scott as the eponymous creepy con man of “Ripley” is the presumed early frontrunner here. And Matt Bomer should definitely be recognized for some career-best work as the closeted bureaucrat in “Fellow Travelers.” Perhaps a long shot but I’m going to give a shout to Hoa Xuande as “The Sympathizer’s” complicated Captain.

    Trey Mangum
    Shadow and Act

    1. Kelvin Harrison Jr. (“Genius: MLK/X”)
    2. Aaron Pierre (“Genius: MLK/X”)
    3. Luke James (“Them: The Scare”)
    4. Matt Bomer (“Fellow Travelers”)
    5. David Oyelowo (“Lawmen: Bass Reeves”)

    The dynamic duo of Kelvin Harrison Jr. and Aaron Pierre are outstanding as their respective historical figures in “Genius: MLK/X,” and Matt Bomer was doing some career-best work in “Fellow Travelers.” A performance that slides in right near the end of the eligibility period with some excellent character work is Luke James in “Them: The Scare,” a role that I think will pay off for him big-time in the future.

    Matt Roush
    TV Guide

    1. Matt Bomer (“Fellow Travelers”)
    2. Tom Hollander (“Feud: Capote vs. the Swans”)
    3. Jon Hamm (“Fargo”)
    4. Ewan McGregor (“A Gentleman in Moscow”)
    5. Tony Shalhoub (“Mr. Monk’s Last Case: A Monk Movie”)

    This is one of the toughest fields to narrow down. Good luck choosing among “Fellow Travelers’” Matt Bomer, doing career-high work, Jon Hamm’s menacing “Fargo” sheriff, Tom Hollander’s convincing impersonation of the self-destructive Truman Capote and Ewan McGregor’s charming “Moscow” count. And you’d be foolish to dismiss Tony Shalhoub’s and “Monk’s” appeal among Emmy voters.

    Glenn Whipp
    Los Angeles Times

    1. Andrew Scott (“Ripley”)
    2. Tom Hollander (“Feud: Capote vs. the Swans”)
    3. Ewan McGregor (“A Gentleman in Moscow”)
    4. Richard Gadd (“Baby Reindeer”)
    5. Austin Butler (“Masters of the Air”)

    It’s hard to escape the shadow of Philip Seymour Hoffman’s Oscar-winning portrayal of Truman Capote, but Tom Hollander did just that in “Feud,” capturing the writer’s tragic flaws and winning charm.

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