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Entertainment & Arts

Daniel Craig, Rachel Weisz to star together on Broadway

Daniel Craig, Rachel Weisz to star together on Broadway
Daniel Craig and his wife Rachel Weisz arrive at the Golden Globes.
(Jordan Strauss / Invision/AP)

Hollywood power couple Daniel Craig (a.k.a. James Bond) and Rachel Weisz (most recently in “Oz: The Great and Powerful”) are to head to Broadway in the fall, costarring as husband and wife in Harold Pinter’s “Betrayal.”

Tony Award winner Mike Nichols is to direct the revival and Scott Rudin will produce, Rudin’s office announced Friday.

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The production marks Craig’s return to Broadway after the hugely successful “A Steady Rain,” which costarred Hugh Jackman, in 2009. The Pinter play will be Weisz’s Broadway debut, though she’s no stranger to theater. She appeared in Neil LaBute’s “The Shape of Things” off-Broadway in 2001 and starred in a revival of “A Streetcar Named Desire” at London’s Donmar Warehouse in 2009.

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Pinter’s 1978 play about an extramarital affair originally premiered at the National Theatre in London. It won the 1979 Olivier Award for best new play and the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for best foreign play.  

It is noted for its unusual structure, which has more in common with such films as “Pulp Fiction” and “Memento” than plays, with several of the scenes appearing in reverse chronology.

Craig is to play Robert, a publisher who is married to Emma (Weisz’s character) and also in a years-long affair with Jerry, his best friend, who will be played by British actor Rafe Spall. Spall last year appeared in the Nick Payne play “Constellations” in London.

The limited run of “Betrayal” is scheduled to begin previews at the Barrymore Theatre on Oct. 1, open on Nov. 3 and end on Jan. 5, 2014.

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