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Mayim Bialik on religion in Hollywood: 'It's never going to be trendy to be observant'

Mayim Bialik on religion in Hollywood: 'It's never going to be trendy to be observant'
Mayim Bialik of "The Big Bang Theory" studies Jewish texts weekly and believes inmodesty, but also says she doesn't like "the bureaucracy of organized religion." (Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times)

Mayim Bialik's Fox News interview about her new lifestyle site has unintentionally turned into a proclamation about the faithful in Hollywood.

"The Big Bang Theory" star, an active member of the Jewish faith, acknowledged in a Facebook post sharing the interview that her statements about religion had eclipsed what she had to say about her latest endeavor, GrokNation.com.

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"yes, i did an interview with FOX news, and yes they put a sort of flashy saucy title on it, but they talked about GrokNation and I appreciate that very much!" the 39-year-old Emmy nominee wrote.

Indeed, Fox News' headline read: "Mayim Bialik: Hollywood is not friendly to people of faith." The story focused on her religious remark while briefly mentioning her site and "Big Bang" at the end, which, in all fairness, is a common practice with celebrity interviews.

Without further ado, here's what the "Blossom" alum had to say about religion in Tinseltown:

"I think in general it's never going to be trendy to be observant or religious in Hollywood circles," she said. "There are people I know of faith and we tend to congregate together."

The mother of two, who studies Jewish texts weekly and believes in modesty, also said she doesn't like "the bureaucracy of organized religion."

"I have an unwavering faith in a power greater than myself and I don't think that will change any more than my belief in gravity will change," Bialik added. "In terms of observance, my social media shuts down for [the Sabbath] and sometimes we go to synagogue, sometimes we stay at home and we do [Sabbath dinners]. ... I believe in [Jewish law], but I also believe in the permeability and changeability in the structure of Jewish law and I think Judaism has always adjusted to the times that it lived in, and it's adjusting in the time we are in now."

She's also dealt with numerous naysayers who can't reconcile her degree in neuroscience with her belief in God.

"It leads to a lot of interesting conversations that I welcome, but a lot of people want to open up a conversation just to tell you you're wrong."

Twitter: @NardineSaad

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