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The Game, Snoop Dogg push for Laura Ingraham’s firing after Nipsey Hussle diss

The Game, Snoop Dogg push for Laura Ingraham’s firing after Nipsey Hussle diss
Laura Ingraham is catching fire from the Game and other rappers who lit her up on social media over comments about the late Nipsey Hussle. (Shawn Thew / REX/Shutterstock, left; Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times, right)

The Game, T.I., Snoop Dogg and other rappers have threatened Fox News’ Laura Ingraham with another boycott after the conservative host criticized a song featuring Nipsey Hussle the day after the rapper’s funeral procession took over South L.A.

“Now, this dear artist recently released a song called ‘FDT,’” Ingraham said on Friday’s “The Ingraham Angle,” showing little respect for the rapper who was shot dead March 31. Then she played a bleeped-out clip of the chorus, which repeats the phrase “... Donald Trump” over and over again, using a profanity.

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“That's a very creative refrain,” Ingraham said. “Very catchy. ... The refrain, the chorus that goes on and on, is that related to the lowest unemployment ever, basically, for African Americans?”

On Sunday, rapper the Game posted the video clip on Instagram with an angry message urging people to boycott Ingraham’s show, calling her a vulgar name along the way.

“Nips passing nor his legacy is to be taken lightly as there will be consequences for any disrespect now or in the future as long as I have a voice,” he wrote after laying out a plan that challenged Fox News to fire Ingraham by Monday or face a boycott.

“This is not a game & my brothers untimely demise has noticeably shifted the world & brought people from all ethnicity’s together in mourning,” wrote the Game, whose real name is Jayceon Terrell Taylor. “There is a power in that, that will be used & action will be taken from now going forward. We will not be accepting any apology from her... we want her fired, PERIOD !!!!!”

“I’m in,” replied Snoop Dogg.

T.I. posted his own copy of the video clip of Ingraham’s show and said, “This is Disgusting! You both are vile despicable, poor excuses for people.”

He added, “WE ALL GET OUR TURN TO LIVE THROUGH OUR OWN PERSONAL TRAGEDY... and watch how many people dance in the streets,laugh and crack distasteful inappropriate jokes when it’s YOUR TURN!!!! Karma is constant & the laws of reciprocity ARE IN ORDER!!!”

And R&B artist Tank urged his followers to sign a petition calling for Ingraham’s firing.

“Disrespecting the deceased is not news! It’s just disrespect!,” he wrote.

Ingraham had no reaction on social media Monday or Tuesday. A Fox News spokesperson did not respond immediately to The Times’ request for comment.

This isn’t the first time Ingraham has weathered a backlash for her views. In March 2018 she was hit with a boycott effort after she tweeted out a story about Parkland, Fla., student David Hogg and included a jab about Hogg’s college rejections. The host apologized a day later, but the boycott push did do some damage.

The Hussle song that Ingraham criticized is a collaboration between Hussle and rapper YG and was released in 2016 when Donald Trump was merely a candidate for the Oval Office. So Ingraham’s comment that the song was recent was a stretch. However, YG performed “FDT” on Sunday at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, bringing out a Trump impersonator to harass the crowd before the specifically anti-Trump anthem.

Hussle, whose real name was Ermias Asghedom, previously gave credit to YG for coming up with the concept for the song, which he called a “combo” from the two rappers.

“He had a beat and just started mumbling the hook,” Hussle told Billboard in April 2016. “We was in the studio listening to it and we was like, ‘Go lay that right there.’ We heard it back through the speakers and we already knew this was powerful. I went in and immediately laid my verse. He went back and laid his, and the record was done in less than an hour.”

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Hussle said Trump’s views on Latinos and immigration pushed him over the top.

“No. 1, I’m from L.A. so I grew up with Mexican people, and No. 2, I see Mexican people at all my concerts that really support. I felt like they needed somebody to ride for ’em,” he said.

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