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Scott Weiland died of accidental multiple-drug overdose, medical examiner says

Scott Weiland died of accidental multiple-drug overdose, medical examiner says
For a generation too young to have experienced Robert Plant, Freddie Mercury or Mick Jagger in their primes, Scott Weiland, seen here in 1998, was the definition of a rock singer. (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)

Scott Weiland died of an accidental overdose of cocaine, alcohol and methylenedioxyamphetamine, the drug commonly known as MDA.

The cause of death of the former Stone Temple Pilots and Velvet Revolver frontman was confirmed Friday by the Hennepin County Medical Examiner in Minneapolis, where the rocker died.

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The medical examiner's office also noted Weiland's atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, history of asthma and multi-substance dependence as significant contributors to his death.

Weiland, 48, was found dead on Dec. 3 after dying in his sleep on a tour stop in Bloomington, Minn.

Police reported finding cocaine in his tour bus, and a member of his backing band, the Wildabouts, was arrested and charged with possession of a controlled substance that police identified as cocaine. Weiland and the Wildabouts were scheduled to play the Medina Entertainment Center in Minnesota the day he was found.

In March, the band's guitarist, Jeremy Brown, died from multiple-drug intoxication the day before the group released its debut album, "Blaster."

In the days after Weiland's death, there were questions about his sobriety and whether the rock star, who had long battled with addiction, had fallen off the wagon. His wife reportedly said he was sober and there were reports that his close friends were worried he had been using again.

Weiland's ex-wife Mary Forsberg Weiland penned an open letter on behalf of the former couple's two teenage children asking the public to not glorify his death and to think twice before indulging in rock star's troubles as entertainment.

"We don't want to downplay Scott's amazing talent, presence or his ability to light up any stage with brilliant electricity. So many people have been gracious enough to praise his gift. The music is here to stay. But at some point, someone needs to step up and point out that, yes, this will happen again -- because as a society we almost encourage it," the letter read. "We read awful show reviews, watch videos of artists falling down, unable to recall their lyrics streaming on a teleprompter just a few feet away. And then we click 'add to cart' because what actually belongs in a hospital is now considered art."

For more music news follow me on Twitter: @gerrickkennedy

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