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Buy This Now: Bell peppers, with 12 recipes

Buy This Now: Bell peppers, with 12 recipes
Shakshuka (Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times)

Roast red and yellow peppers over an open fire. Rub away the charred peppery skin and pull the flesh apart. Season with a little minced garlic, good olive oil and salt and pepper. Serve on a platter with fresh cheese — it really doesn't matter which one: ricotta, goat, mozzarella or, of course, burrata.

The summer table holds many pleasures, but I can't think of one that is better than that. Happily, it's also hard to think of one that's easier.

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There's nothing at the farmers market that sums up late summer like the mounds of brightly colored peppers that seem to be everywhere. Their colors — red and yellow, even purple and brown — are so saturated they seem to have been designed for the painterly golden light at this time of year. And they taste as good as they look.

Unfortunately, the looks can be a little deceiving. When it comes to flavor, there's really only two stages: unripe green and ripe. All of those brightly colored peppers taste pretty much the same.

And though you can find "chocolate" brown and even purple peppers, be aware that those colors will fade with cooking.

How to choose: Look for peppers that are firm, deeply colored and glossy. Peppers that are boxy, with the straightest sides will be the easiest to peel.

How to store: Keep peppers in the refrigerator, tightly wrapped in a plastic bag.

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