Advertisement
California

Late-spring rainstorm will hit Southern California this weekend

Huntington Beach
Surfer and Huntington Beach lifeguard Jachin Hamborg watches the dramatic sky and waves after surfing following his lifeguarding shift at dusk at the Huntington Beach Pier.
(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

Southern California’s wet season is not quite over.

A late-spring storm is expected to bring rain — and perhaps even snow — to the region:

Rain total forecast for region
Rain total forecast for region (National Weather Service)

WHAT TO EXPECT

Sunday showers

Here’s the forecast for the Los Angeles area from the NWS:

Saturday: Cloudy with a slight chance of rain during the day and evening. Highs in the 60s.

Sunday: The chance of rain jumps to 60%, with showers most likely in the morning and tapering off in afternoon and evening. Some areas could see thunderstorms. Lightning is possible along the coast, and some mountains could get a dusting of snow. Highs in the 50s.

Monday: Rain is possible Monday morning, giving way to partly cloudy skies. Highs in the 70s.

The National Weather Service outlines what to expect this weekend.
The National Weather Service outlines what to expect this weekend. (NWS)

WHAT IS GOING ON?

A late-spring storm is not unusual

“This isn’t completely unusual, but we don’t get a lot of storms this late in the season,” Jimmy Taeger, a forecaster at the National Weather Service in Rancho Bernardo, told the San Diego Union-Tribune.

Motorists should watch for travel advisories in the mountains. An inch or two of snow could fall above the 5,000-foot level, and there could be trace amounts as low as 4,000 feet.

The cold and rain are expected to last into Monday, and the region won’t fully return to seasonal conditions until Wednesday.

Support our journalism

Already a subscriber? Thank you for your support. If you are not, please consider subscribing today. Get full access to our signature journalism for just 99 cents for the first four weeks.

ALSO

Sharks are thriving in Southern California but dying in the San Francisco Bay, experts say

Central California towns in trouble if Sierra snowpack melts too fast

Insects and disease are ravaging the Southland's urban trees. Who's going to stop them?


Newsletter
Get our Essential California newsletter
Advertisement