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Americans are getting killed for going about their daily lives

To the editor: Just after Jonah Goldberg's column on the Planned Parenthood shooting last Friday appeared, we are suddenly faced with a new and even worse mass shooting. ("Was Robert Lewis Dear inspired by the Planned Parenthood videos? So what if he was?," Opinion, Dec. 1)

Goldberg is right that in a certain sense it does not matter why these shootings go on; the fact is they do. And that is the problem: We are beginning to reach a critical mass in terror. Our nation may wag its collective finger at civil wars in foreign lands, but over a period of five days, at least 17 Americans died for the crime of going about their daily routines.

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At some point, it is perhaps reasonable to ask what kind of civilization are we that we as a people can find no common ground to ensure the safety of our fellow citizens.

Oliver Cutshaw, Los Angeles

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To the editor: By stating that the GOP candidates and the Center for Medical Progress should not be held responsible, even remotely, for the shooting at the Colorado Springs Planned Parenthood, Goldberg smacks himself in the face with his own goofy logic.

In a Nov. 21 column for the National Review, Goldberg wrote the following: "The Islamic State is called 'the Islamic State.' I used to eat at a restaurant called Burrito Brothers. Saying that Islamic State has nothing to do with Islam is like telling someone eating a burrito they bought at Burrito Brothers that Burrito Brothers has 'nothing whatsoever' to do with burritos."

The Republican candidates have stood onstage and called out, "Ready. Aim." Just because they haven't yelled out "Fire!" doesn't absolve them.

Paula Del, Los Angeles

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To the editor: If "The Catcher in the Rye," "The Dark Knight Rises" or "Zeitgeist" — all mentioned by Goldberg — had motivated many people to act out violently, he might have a case. But we do have countless numbers of healthcare providers and others seeking help as innocent victims of the anti-abortion movement.

Richard Kopelle, Los Angeles

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