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Opinion

Readers React: How is knowingly using toxic lead in paint not a criminally chargeable offense?

California lead paint intiative comes under fire
A California ballot measure would make taxpayers, not paint companies, fund the cleanup of lead-based paint in older homes.
(Dreamstime / TNS)

To the editor: Personally, I think the legal system has been too easy on these companies that deliberately chose to use lead in their paint when they knew it was harmful to their customers.

It seems to me some executives should have been criminally charged. The possibility of serving just a few days in jail would make some chief executives more mindful of their responsibilities.

Legislators should not be willing to horse trade on this issue and help the paint companies circumvent the court order to pay for removing their harmful products from older homes.

Marie Wade, Hermosa Beach

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To the editor: On the subject of paint companies Sherwin-Williams and Conagra trying to get past their losing in court regarding the cleanup of lead paint, no matter what happens — the $2-billion bond measure to fund cleanup or the idea of just adding a $2 fee on every can of paint — the companies will be relieved of paying for their greed.

Of course we, the consumers, will pay for this one way or the other. Whatever happens, stockholders won’t be paying for all of this. Look for higher paint prices.

Dean Blau, Van Nuys

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