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Hey, President Trump, being paranoid didn't work out so well for Richard Nixon

Hey, President Trump, being paranoid didn't work out so well for Richard Nixon
Then U.S. President Barack Obama and President-elect Donald Trump meet in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington on Nov. 10, 2016. (Michael Reynolds / EPA)

To the editor: It seems obvious that the reason President Trump thinks his phones were tapped during the campaign is that he can't understand how else it could be known that some in his operation had contact with Russia. Perhaps he cannot figure out that it was simply a matter of the Russians being under surveillance. ("Republicans: Don't enable Trump's absurd Obama wiretapping accusation," editorial, March 7)

Now he thinks his only move is to obfuscate and to otherwise cover up the already known information before it becomes more widely known and accepted.

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Yet with each and every effort he makes to do so, he simply becomes more and more reminiscent of Richard Nixon — and more certain to suffer the same appropriately disgraceful fate.

Rick Goldfarb, Sherman Oaks

..

To the editor: It's worth noting a serious misstatement concluding the lead editorial denouncing Trump's "reckless" wiretappings accusations:

"Meanwhile, if the president expects to be treated fairly he will stop the baseless attacks on others — including his predecessor."

On the contrary, Trump is getting treated quite fairly: He's getting everything he deserves from The Times and Democrats alike.

Brett Gottlieb, Berkeley

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To the editor: If you think the wiretap tale was bad, wait until he gets to the missing strawberries.

Ryan MacDonald, Woodland Hills

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