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Letters to the Editor: Trump didn’t prepare for the coronavirus, and neither did you

To the editor: President Trump has been extensively blamed for not preparing to contain the coronavirus in the United States. Problem is, millions of us did not prepare either.

Initially many people thought that the virus was a Chinese malaise, one that wouldn’t touch our Western world. When alarming news came from Italy, many said it was a virus that was dangerous only to the elderly, and as such more protective measures were needed in nursing homes.

Let’s face it: We did not want to alter our lives. When social distancing and stay-home orders took effect, many people thought governments were overreacting. It took weeks to build a national consensus on the need for such action.

After five weeks of this, it is time to stop the blame game and concentrate efforts not only on gradually getting to back to normal, but also better preparing for future catastrophes.

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Berta Graciano-Buchman, Beverly Hills

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To the editor: Columnist Nicholas Goldberg misses a crucial fact.

If Trump were a CEO and mismanaged a corporate crisis, he would be fired immediately, not after the bankruptcy. If he were a general who mismanaged a crucial deployment, he would be relieved of command immediately, not after the war ended.

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We know that Trump has mishandled this crisis. Now is exactly the time for placing blame, and since we can’t fire him, we need to limit his authority in other ways. Waiting has already cost lives.

Rob Aft, Rancho Park

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To the editor: Goldberg suggests Democrats should stop assigning blame for the unnecessary deaths in the coronavirus crisis. He mentions the very reason why his conclusion is wrong: Trump is furiously trying to rewrite history to cast himself as the nation’s savior.

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If the Democrats were to go silent, Trump would likely succeed and therefore ensure his reelection in November. We should not take Goldberg’s advice and hand Trump the presidency again.

Mark Chipman, San Diego


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