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The Times podcast: Your future meal might be grasshoppers

Central de Abastos Oaxaca
Alicia Garcia Perez, 18, and her brother Demetrio Garcia Perez, 31, sell grasshoppers at the Central de Abastos. Each purple bag with white stripes weighs 5 kilograms.
(Eva Lepiz / For The Times)

Grasshopper hunting has been going on in Mexico for thousands of years, but lately eating them has gained wider acceptance. Consumption of the jumpy little protein-packed insects is booming, and more and more restaurants are putting them on the menu ... and not just in Mexico.

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Today, chapulines, the world of harvesting and eating grasshoppers in Mexico. Read the full transcript here.

Host: Gustavo Arellano

Guests: L.A. Times Latin America correspondent Leila Miller

More reading:

Are grasshoppers as delicious as ham? Mexico’s insect hunters would like you to find out

Review: ‘Bugs’ documentary explores insect-eating as a cure for world hunger

This pop-up dinner menu is full of bugs. Yes, those kinds of bugs

About The Times

“The Times” is produced by Shannon Lin, Denise Guerra, Kasia Broussalian, David Toledo and Ashlea Brown. Our editorial assistants are Roberto Reyes and Nicolas Perez. Our engineers are Mario Diaz, Mark Nieto and Mike Heflin. Our editor is Kinsee Morlan. Our executive producers are Jazmin Aguilera, Heba Elorbany and Shani Hilton. And our theme music is by Andrew Eapen.

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