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339 posts
  • Congress
(Associated Press)

Rep. John Conyers Jr. announced Sunday he was relinquishing his House committee position amid allegations he sexually harassed female staffers.

The announcement came shortly after House minority leader Nancy Pelosi repeatedly called on the Michigan Democrat to “do the right thing.” At the same time, she said he deserved due process.

Conyers, who has denied the allegations, said in a statement he was stepping down as ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee while he faces an ethics investigation.

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Mick Mulvaney
Mick Mulvaney (Andrew Harnik / Associated Press)

White House officials said Saturday that President Trump was on solid legal ground in naming Mick Mulvaney as acting director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau despite the departing chief’s last-minute designation of a new deputy to temporarily run the agency.

The dueling claims to the bureau’s temporary leadership — until a permanent director is nominated and confirmed by the Senate — could put the controversial consumer watchdog in legal turmoil.

Senior administration officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said Saturday that Mulvaney’s appointment was consistent with the Federal Vacancies Reform Act of 1998 and they hoped to avoid a court fight.

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(Associated Press)

Sen. Al Franken has apologized again for alleged inappropriate conduct as two more women emerged to accuse him of groping.

The Democrat from Minnesota said he was attempting to “regain trust” of his constituency even as some colleagues called for his resignation.

Following allegations that broke last week involving Franken’s inappropriately touching two women, another two women told Huffington Post that that senator displayed similar behavior with them. The latest two women were not identified. 

(Associated Press)

President Trump on Thursday used a gratitude message to American troops overseas to take credit for a “win” in Afghanistan and to “give thanks to God” for freedom.

The unusual Thanksgiving message was delivered by Trump from his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida over an internet connection to military men and women stationed near Kabul.

“I have to say just directly to the folks in Afghanistan: Everybody’s talking about the progress you’ve made in the last few months since I opened it up,” Trump said, according to pool reports.

Roy Moore, the flailing Alabama candidate for U.S. Senate, has been abandoned by the national Republican Party and most of its leaders.

He’s being vastly outspent by his Democratic rival, pummeled on the television airwaves and battered in the state’s newspapers. “Stand for Decency, Reject Roy Moore,” Alabama’s three leading papers thundered in a joint editorial emblazoned on Sunday’s front pages.

And yet with just about two weeks to go until the Dec. 12 vote, the race is far from over.

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Rep. Joe Barton
Rep. Joe Barton (Associated Press)

Texas Rep. Joe Barton is apologizing after a nude photo of him circulated on social media. 

Barton released a statement Wednesday to the Texas Tribune acknowledging that while separated from his second wife, prior to their divorce, he had sexual relationships “with other mature adult women.” 

The 68-year-old Republican from Ennis says each relationship was consensual and since has ended. He says, “I am sorry I did not use better judgment during those days. I am sorry that I let my constituents down.” 

  • Congress
  • Taxes
  • Budget
The House passed the Republican tax bill last week on Capitol Hill. (Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images)
The House passed the Republican tax bill last week on Capitol Hill. (Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images)

The Senate Republican tax bill might have a so-called Byrd rule problem by adding to the federal deficit after 10 years, according to a report released Wednesday.

Forecasters at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania agreed that during the first decade, the tax plan stays within the $1.5 trillion in additional deficit spending allowed by Senate budget rules.

But by 2028, they said, the model shows $29 billion in additional deficit, and red ink continues for several more years. Eventually, the model shows revenues from expiring tax cuts and growth making up for the shortfall.

LaVar Ball, father of the Lakers' Lonzo Ball and UCLA player LiAngelo Ball, watches a Lakers game in Vegas in July.
LaVar Ball, father of the Lakers' Lonzo Ball and UCLA player LiAngelo Ball, watches a Lakers game in Vegas in July. (John Locher / Associated Press)

In a way, it’s the matchup sports fans have been waiting for.

In one corner: famous sports dad LaVar Ball, who has risen to notoriety by being the father of the NBA Lakers' Lonzo Ball, UCLA player LiAngelo Ball and high schooler LaMelo Ball.

In the other corner: the president of the United States, Donald Trump (who also has famous kids, but that’s for another story).

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A photo of accused terrorist Sayfullo Saipov is displayed at a news conference after his arrest.
A photo of accused terrorist Sayfullo Saipov is displayed at a news conference after his arrest. (Craig Ruttle / Associated Press)

The man accused of driving a van onto a crowded Manhattan sidewalk in an attack inspired by Islamic State, killing eight people and injuring 12 others, will face murder and terrorism charges in federal court in New York.

Immediately after the attacks, President Trump said he would consider detaining Sayfullo Habibullaevic Saipov at the prison camp on the naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, but later backed off and said it would be better to allow him to face justice in New York, where prosecutors have become practiced at terrorism trials.

A grand jury in New York on Tuesday indicted Saipov, 29, on eight counts of murder and 12 counts of attempted murder in the Oct. 31 attack. He also faces charges of providing support to a terrorist group and causing death with a vehicle.