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339 posts
  • White House
  • Russia
President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Vietnam in November.
President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Vietnam in November. (Mikhail Klimentyev / AFP/Getty Images)

Russian President Vladimir Putin doesn’t have a Twitter account, but that doesn’t mean he’s not following every tweet posted by @realDonaldTrump.

In fact, Trump’s tweets are presented to Putin every day in his daily briefings and considered White House statements, according to Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov.

“Moscow considers all statements made on his [Trump’s] official Twitter account to be official, so reports are presented to President Putin about them, as well as about official statements that politicians make in other countries," Peskov said Tuesday in his daily phone call with the press.

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  • White House
  • Congress
  • Taxes
President Trump discusses tax changes with Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), left, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) in September at the White House.
President Trump discusses tax changes with Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), left, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) in September at the White House. (Evan Vucci / Associated Press)

The rush to finish the GOP tax overhaul has hit a snag as Republicans grapple with substantial differences between the House and Senate bills, and pause to consider unintended consequences of the most massive rewrite of the tax code in a generation.

Lawmakers are eager to pass the bill, President Trump’s top domestic priority, by Christmas. But they are also increasingly wary of political fallout from the hurried process and want to prevent embarrassing moments, such as the scribbled text hastily added to the margin of the final Senate bill.

The end of any major legislative undertaking is often a sprint. But the final stretch of the GOP tax plan is being complicated by an accelerated process like none other in recent history.

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(Michael Reynolds / European Pressphoto Agency)

President Trump wrote a sexually suggestive tweet on Tuesday about New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, after the Democratic lawmaker called for him to resign over sexual misconduct allegations.

Trump wrote that “Lightweight” Gillibrand “would come to my office ‘begging’ for campaign contributions not so long ago (and would do anything for them).”

Trump’s tweet was unusually provocative for a sitting U.S. president, and politically risky given national attention to the topic of sexual harassment of women as well as renewed attention to the allegations against him by more than a dozen women complaining of his past misconduct. Social media and cable television talk shows quickly ignited with bipartisan outrage.

One of our attorneys is a Jew.

One of our attorneys is a Jew

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With the help of two high-profile surrogates, Roy Moore and Doug Jones scrambled Monday to stake their final claims in Alabama’s cliffhanger of a U.S. Senate race.

Moore, who largely disappeared from public view after being accused of sexual misconduct, resurfaced for an election eve rally with Stephen K. Bannon, a political advisor to President Trump, in the rural southeast corner of the state.

“We’re Alabama. We’re Republican. And we’re not going to stand by and let other people from out of state and money from California control this election,” he told cheering supporters in Midland City.

  • White House
Jamie McCourt
Jamie McCourt (Nick Ut / AP)

Former Los Angeles Dodgers co-owner and Trump fundraiser Jamie McCourt was sworn in as the U.S. ambassador to France and Monaco at the White House on Monday, a White House official said. 

The swearing-in took place inside the Oval Office, said deputy press secretary Lindsay Walters. No reporters were allowed to attend the ceremony. Walters said President Trump was present, and Vice President Mike Pence administered the oath to McCourt.

McCourt, a lawyer and entrepreneur, was one of Trump’s early supporters. She signed a letter in October 2016 with 100 other business executives praising Trump’s economic plans and was listed as a 2016 State Victory Finance Chair for Trump’s campaign in California.

Arnold Schwarzenegger arrives by bicycle to meet Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo on Monday.
Arnold Schwarzenegger arrives by bicycle to meet Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo on Monday. (Thibault Camus / Associated Press)

He showed up at Paris City Hall on Monday on a green bicycle and wearing a green tie to talk climate change with the mayor.

But Arnold Schwarzenegger almost didn’t make the trip from Los Angeles. One of the wildfires scorching Southern California was threatening his home.

“Luckily we have extraordinary firefighters,” he told a group of officials and journalists.

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President Obama in Selma, Ala., at a 2015 commemoration of the 1965 civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery.
President Obama in Selma, Ala., at a 2015 commemoration of the 1965 civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery. (Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press)

Former President Obama and his vice president, Joe Biden, each provided last-minute help to fellow Democrat Doug Jones in Tuesday’s Alabama Senate election, but the candidate is keeping quiet about it.

Obama and Biden recorded robocalls urging Alabama voters to cast ballots for Jones in his contest against Republican Roy Moore.

But Jones denied knowing whose calls his campaign was placing to voters.

Protesters demonstrate in New York's Time Square in July over President Trump's ban on transgender people joining the military.
Protesters demonstrate in New York's Time Square in July over President Trump's ban on transgender people joining the military. (Jewel Samad / AFP/ Getty Images)

The Pentagon is allowing transgender people to enlist in the military beginning Jan. 1, despite President Trump's opposition.

The new policy reflects growing legal pressure on the issue, and the difficult hurdles the federal government would have to cross to enforce Trump's demand to ban transgender individuals from the military. Two federal courts already have ruled against the ban. Potential transgender recruits will have to overcome a lengthy and strict set of physical, medical and mental conditions that make it possible, though difficult, for them to join the armed services.

Maj. David Eastburn, a Pentagon spokesman, says the enlistment of transgender recruits will start Jan. 1 and go on amid the legal battles. The Defense Department also is studying the issue.