Advertisement

Want to hop aboard Arizona’s Polar Express? Hurry, because some December rides are sold-out

Santa Claus appears on the Grand Canyon Railway Polar Express from early November through Jan. 3.

Santa Claus appears on the Grand Canyon Railway Polar Express from early November through Jan. 3.

(Xanterra)

If you want to visit the Arizona-style North Pole this holiday season, you better buy tickets now. Some December dates are sold-out for the magical Polar Express train ride to visit Santa that begins in Williams, Ariz.

The Grand Canyon Railway takes children and their families to the North Pole at 5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. from Nov. 6 through Jan. 3. Santa Claus and reindeer appear at the North Pole stop, where every child receives a gift as well as hot chocolate and cookies.

The ride takes a little more than an hour. Tickets for Dec. 5, 12, 19 and 20 are already sold-out; some seats remain on the 5:30 p.m. ride Dec. 18 but the 7:30 p.m. ride on that date is sold-out.

Tickets are still available for Dec. 21, 22 and 23, and Christmas Eve Limited trains are close to selling out too.

Advertisement

Ticket prices Sunday through Thursday cost $29 for children 2 to 15 years old and $39 for adults; Saturday and Sunday tickets cost $35 for children and $45 for adults. Christmas Eve Limited runs on Dec. 24 cost $69 for adults and $55 for children.

You can also take 3:30 p.m. rides on selected dates too. And an overnight package at the Grand Canyon Railway Hotel plus train tickets for two adults and two children starts at $404, excluding taxes. Check the website for details.

You can buy Polar Express tickets online by calling the Grand Canyon Railway. The train ride is based on the 1985 children’s book by Chris Van Allsburg that also inspired the 2004 movie.

Info: Grand Canyon Railway Polar Express, (888) 848-3511

Advertisement

ALSO:

Learn how to spin, scratch, repeat at this DJ retreat in Puerto Rico

Deal: Save $1,000 on a December river cruise from Cambodia to Vietnam

Cruise the Med and cook with French chef Jacques Pepin

Advertisement

Iowa barns, even the quirky ‘cone-head,’ open their doors to you


Advertisement