Sports SUMMER OLYMPICS

The 2016 Rio Olympics have come to a close with Americans earning 121 medals -- 46 gold, 37 silver and 38 bronze -- their biggest haul ever, not counting the boycotted 1984 Los Angeles Games or the 1904 St. Louis Games, when hardly anyone else showed up.

Two Guinea athletes do not return home after Rio Olympics

Mamadama Bangoura carries the flag of Guinea during the opening ceremony for the Rio Olympics on Aug. 5. (Sergey Ilnitsky /EPA)
Mamadama Bangoura carries the flag of Guinea during the opening ceremony for the Rio Olympics on Aug. 5. (Sergey Ilnitsky /EPA)

The head of Guinea's Olympic delegation says two athletes did not return to the West African nation after competing at the Rio Olympics. 

Atef Chaloub said Saturday that swimmer Amadou Camara disappeared 48 hours before the team's scheduled departure. He said Mamadama Bangoura, who competed in judo, also did not return to Guinea, having disappeared after leaving a message saying she wanted to “try her luck” abroad. 

A friend of Bangoura's, who spoke on condition of anonymity to avoid punishment for failing to stop her from fleeing, said Bangoura was ashamed she didn't earn a medal and wanted to try “working in a developed country.”

More than a dozen African athletes — including some from Guinea — did not return home after the London Olympics in 2012. 

Rio police's account of Ryan Lochte incident may not be entirely accurate either, report says

U.S. swimmer Ryan Lochte won one medal at the Rio Olympics, a gold in the men's 800-meter freestyle relay. (Patrick B. Kraemer / European Pressphoto Agency)
U.S. swimmer Ryan Lochte won one medal at the Rio Olympics, a gold in the men's 800-meter freestyle relay. (Patrick B. Kraemer / European Pressphoto Agency)

The extent of the property damage Ryan Lochte and three of his fellow U.S. Olympic swimmers caused to a gas station eight days ago might have been exaggerated by Rio de Janeiro police, according to a report by USA Today.

At a news conference Thursday, Fernando Veloso, the head of Rio de Janeiro's civil police, said the Americans had broken a soap dispenser and mirror inside the restroom. Other reports have said the four also broke a bathroom door.

But one of the U.S. swimmers, Gunnar Bentz, said in a statement Friday that he didn’t see anyone vandalize the bathroom and the only damage caused by the group occurred when Lochte pulled a “loosely attached” advertising sign from a wall.

In examining all available surveillance footage from that night, including one aimed at the restroom doors, USA Today found no evidence the swimmers ever went near the bathroom, after relieving themselves behind the gas station.

A USA Today videographer visited the gas station and found no damage to the soap dispensers, mirrors or door, and none of those items appeared to be new.

The swimmers were eventually held at gunpoint by security guards at the station and were released after paying the equivalent of $50.

Fernando Deluz, a bilingual Brazilian who served as a translator between the swimmers and the security guards, told USA his understanding was the money paid was to cover vandalized property and that the only property that came up during the negotiations was the advertising sign Lochte had pulled down.

Deluz also said that because of the language barrier, the Americans might have believed they were being robbed.

NBC's Olympics coverage was vast, and plenty of it mattered

 (Patrick Raycraft / Hartford Courant)
(Patrick Raycraft / Hartford Courant)

On the first Saturday afternoon of the Olympics, NBC’s images of road cycling were so dazzling that the scenes could have been lifted from a travel promotion ad by the Rio de Janeiro tourist board.

The mostly aerial shots that tracked the bikes along the coastline displayed charmingly winding roads, granite peaks, blue-green ocean waves splashing against rocks and houses (some pink) quaintly clinging to hillsides.

Who among us did not consider firing up our laptops to begin researching our next possible vacation destination?

Of course, the bird’s-eye views neglected to capture Rio’s dark side — the slums and the crime, the shoddy transportation system and the pollution. Had our TV sets contained Smell-O-Vision, we might have whiffed the acrid odor that plagues parts of the host city.

Rio 2016 Olympics: Highlights and news

Column: Kevin Durant wakes up and carries U.S. to more gold

 (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)
(Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)

He was branded a traitor, an opportunist, a coward. He was ridiculed in his neighborhood, resented in his workplace, mocked by his former fans.

When Kevin Durant left the Oklahoma City Thunder to join the powerful Golden State Warriors this summer, mere weeks after the Warriors knocked the Thunder out of the playoffs, he was generally described with a single adjective.

Weak.

Nearly two months later and 5,300 miles away, a flag on his chest and a country on his back, Durant changed both the narrative and the adjective Sunday, unleashing a brilliant performance that should provide him with an entirely different shade of moniker.

Gold.

These memories of the Rio Olympics are etched in the minds of our reporters

 (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)
(Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)

My medal platform of memories is filled by two people and a team that not only successfully defended their titles, but made history doing it.

The bronze goes to judoka Kayla Harrison, who become the first American to win two gold medals in her sport. The silver goes to middleweight boxer Claressa Shields, the first American — male or female — to win two Olympic boxing titles.

And the gold goes to the women’s water polo team, which not only became the first repeat champion in the history of its sport, but did it with a heavy heart after the brother of Coach Adam Krikorian died of a heart attack two days before the Games began.

Despite the grief, Krikorian insisted on coaching in Rio, and after the team beat Italy in the final, his players lined up on the side of the pool and, one by one, draped their goal medals around his neck.

— Kevin Baxter

Rio Games: A challenge met, although it wasn't easy

 (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)
(Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)
John Coates, IOC vice president regarding the Rio Games

Dark clouds hovered over Maracana Stadium at dusk, with a sudden wind tugging at flags and whipping the Olympic flame.

Then a drenching rain began to fall.

The storm that intruded on Sunday night’s closing ceremony at the Summer Olympics befit a mega-sporting event that, over the last few weeks, had blended spectacle with more than a few glitches and negative headlines.

“A Games in the middle of reality,” Thomas Bach, president of the International Olympic Committee, had called them.

There were historic performances by some of the world’s greatest athletes, cheered on -- and sometimes booed -- by crowds exhibiting Brazil’s characteristic exuberance.

There were also reports of street crime, logistical gaffes and venue failures suggesting Brazil was not quite ready for prime time.

It was all part of the IOC’s gamble in coming to South America for the first time. The samba dancers and pop musicians who soldiered through Sunday’s inclement weather, and the fireworks that illuminated the gloomy sky at the end, embodied the host city’s determination.

Rio Olympics: Live updates from the closing ceremony

Fireworks explode during the Rio 2016 closing ceremony. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)
Fireworks explode during the Rio 2016 closing ceremony. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

10:45 p.m.: That's all, folks, at least for the official part of the program. Partying might go deep into the night. Thanks, Rio. 

10:40 p.m.: A taste of Carnival, some fireworks, some confetti. Athletes dancing with the performers.Exuberant and vibrant ending. 

10:25 p.m.: Olympic flame is extinguished. Now, much dancing and merriment. 

10:20 p.m.: IOC President Thomas Bach declares the Rio Games closed, calls upon world's youth to reassemble in Tokyo in four years. 

10:16 p.m.: Bach says Rio Olympics will leave a "unique legacy." Seems to be the say-nothing equivalent of calling someone is 'nice.' 

10:15 p.m.: International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach praises  unifying effect of athletes living and competing together at the Games. The scene of the two livid Mongolian wrestling coaches stripping in protest of a bronze-medal match result earlier Sunday and being escorted out by police wasn't quite in line with that lofty ideal. 

10 p.m.: Rio 2016 chief Carlos Arthur Nuzman continues the Olympic spin by saying the rain is coming to celebrate. It looks like it's actually just making everyone cold. 

9:55 p.m.: Tokyo offers a teaser about its Olympics. Looks pretty cool, actually. 

9:47 p.m.: Rio de Janeiro Mayor Eduardo Paes booed as he's introduced. 

9:45 p.m.: Now for the flag handover ceremony from Rio de Janeiro to Tokyo. Here's hoping they complete the exchange better than the U.S. men's 400-meter relay team exchanged the baton.

9:35 p.m.: Coming up soon: a ceremony recognizing the Games' volunteers -- that workforce was one of the trouble spots for the event in both numbers and training -- then then Olympic flag will be lowered. 

9:25 p.m.: Medal ceremony for marathon top three. Way cool.

9:15 p.m.: Now: a tribute to lacemaking. Really. As for the Olympic channel, will it show everything on delay, as NBC did?

9:12 p.m.: Next up: a heart-pounding segment on ... the launch of Olympic channel. At least the athletes have the waves of cold rain to keep them awake. 

9:05 p.m.: The athletes have entered. Was wondering if they'd get into the stadium before the next Olympics. Hey, PyeongChang Games are only, what, 18 months away!

8:50 p.m.: Rain really coming down hard. Many athletes wearing ponchos, jackets with hoods. 

8:40 p.m.: Inside the Games is reporting that major electrical problems at Maracana Stadium have required the use of generators to keep the show going. 

8:35 p.m.: No sign yet of the shirtless Tongan guy from the Opening Ceremony. Did NBC delay his entrance, like it has delayed everything else??

8:30 p.m.: Loads of the big-name U.S. athletes have already departed Rio de Janeiro, including Katie Ledecky, Michael Phelps and, uh, Ryan Lochte. Simone Biles, however, is still here and is the U.S. flag-bearer. 

8:25 p.m.: Athletes still parading in. Line looks as long as I'm anticipating the airline check-in line will be tomorrow morning at GIG.

8:20 p.m.: 'Heroes of the Games'--the athletes--enter the stadium. Colorful display. 

8:15 p.m.: The closing ceremony is underway on a rainy night in Rio de Janeiro. Maracana Stadium is about two-thirds full, continuing the Games-long problem with empty seats.

The 2016 Summer Olympics come to an today, with the closing ceremony scheduled to start at 4 p.m. Pacific time at Maracana Stadium.

You will not be able to watch it on TV, however, until 7 p.m. on NBC, with coverage scheduled to end at 9:30. So, some things could be edited out for time.

As usual, the closing ceremony will end with the official handover of the Olympic flag to Yuriko Koike, governor of Tokyo, host of the 2020 Games, and the extinguishing of the Olympic flame.

And, no, Ryan Lochte is not expected to be there.

Sunday's Rio Olympics schedule and results

The U.S. men's basketball steps up to podium to receive their gold medals. (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)
The U.S. men's basketball steps up to podium to receive their gold medals. (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)

Schedule and results from Sunday's Rio Olympics competition. All times Pacific.

Basketball (Men)

Gold medal game

United States 96, Serbia 66

Bronze medal game

Spain 89, Australia 88

Boxing

Women's middleweight gold medal bout

Claressa Shields, United States, d. Nouchka Fontijn, Netherlands, 3-0

Men's flyweight gold medal bout

Shakhobidin Zoirov, Uzbekistan, d. Mikhail Aloyan, Russia, 3-0

Men's light-welterweight gold medal match

Tony Victor James Yoka, France, d. Joe Joyce, Britain, 2-1

Men's super-heavyweight gold medal match

Tony Victor James Yoka, France, d. Joe Joyce, Britain, 2-1

Cycling

Men's cross-country mountain bike final

Gold--Nino Schurter, Switzerland, 1:33:28

Silver--Jaroslav Kulhavý, Czech Republic, 1:34:18

Bronze--Carlos Coloma Nicolas, Spain, 1:34:51

Handball (Men)

Gold medal match

Denmark 28, France 26 

Bronze medal match

Germany 31, Poland 25

Rhythmic Gymnastics

Group final

Gold--Russia, 36.233 points

Silver--Spain, 35.766

Bronze--Bulgaria, 35.766

Track and Field

Men's marathon

Gold--Eliud Kipchoge, Kenya, 2:08:44

Silver--Feyisa Lilesa, Ethiopia, 2:09:54

Bronze--Galen Rupp, United States, 2:10:05

Volleyball (Men)

Gold medal match

Brazil 3, Italy 0  (25-22, 28-26, 26-24)

Bronze medal match

United States 3, Russia 2  (23-25, 21-25, 25-19, 25-19, 15-13)

Wrestling

Men's freestyle 65 kilograms gold medal match

Soslan Ramonov, Russia, d. Toghrul Asgarov, Azerbaijan, 4-0

Men's freestyle 97 kilograms gold medal match

2016 Rio Olympics in Pictures

See the best images from Times photographers Robert Gauthier and Wally Skalij

USA's Kyle Snyder battles Azerbaijan's Khetag Goziumov in the 97 kg gold medal match. (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)
USA's Kyle Snyder battles Azerbaijan's Khetag Goziumov in the 97 kg gold medal match. (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)

Closing ceremony live: Lace and clay? Sounds like a Batman villain

Closing ceremony live: Anyone need a fill-up?

Kevin Durant leads U.S. to runaway victory over Serbia for men's basketball gold

USA's Kevin Durant, left, and Jimmy Butler celebrate after winning the gold medal. (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)
USA's Kevin Durant, left, and Jimmy Butler celebrate after winning the gold medal. (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)

After Kevin Durant made a three-pointer early in the second quarter, he walked back down the court while pounding his fist on his chest and yelling at his teammates on the bench.

Turns out he was just clearing his throat.

It was Durant’s monster second quarter that ended any notion of an upset and put the U.S. on the gold-medal stand for the third consecutive Olympics with a 96-66 victory over Serbia, which surprised in these Olympics by taking the silver.

Durant had 30 points for the game, 18 of those in the second quarter, when he made Carioca Arena I marvel at both his shooting and athleticism and turned an unwatchable game into can’t-miss television before it eventually became a laugher.

Durant won his second gold medal. Veteran forward Carmelo Anthony and Mike Krzyzewski, coaching his last Olympics for Team USA before ceding to Spurs Coach Gregg Popovich, each picked up their third.

The U.S. had a rocky start to the game in the first quarter when Serbia mucked up the proceedings by fouling the Americans in transition and keeping them from developing an offensive rhythm.

The U.S. led 19-15 at the end of the first following a late three-pointer from Durant, who was beginning to catch fire. This team was often criticized for its lack of ball movement and a propensity for too much one-on-one basketball on offense. The thing is, when one of those players is feeling it as Durant was Sunday, even that brand of basketball looks effective.

The U.S. continued to pour it on in the second half, making it a smooth gold-medal game after an Olympics filled with bumps in the road. There were close victories against Serbia, France and Australia in pool play, but this team, though not as dominant over the tournament as some of its predecessors, avoided the embarrassment of coming home with anything less than gold.

Saturday's Rio Olympics schedule and results

The U.S. women's basketball team celebrates after beating Spain for the gold medal. (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)
The U.S. women's basketball team celebrates after beating Spain for the gold medal. (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)

Schedule and results from Saturday's Rio Olympics competition. All times Pacific.

Badminton

Men's singles gold medal match

Chen Long, China, d. Lee Chong Wei, Malaysia, 2-0

Men's singles bronze medal match

Viktor Axelsen, Denmark, d. Lin Dan, China, 2-1

Basketball (Women)

Gold medal game

United States 101, Spain 72

Bronze medal game

Serbia 70, France 63

Boxing

Women's flyweight gold medal match

Nicola Adams, Great Britain, d. Sarah Ourahmoune, France, 3-0

Men's bantamweight gold medal match

Robeisy Ramirez Carrazana, Cuba, d. Shakur Stevenson, United States, 2-1

Men's middleweight gold medal match

Arlen Lopez, Cuba, d. Bektemir Melikuziev, Uzbekistan, 3-0

Canoe/Kayak

Men's kayak single 200-meter sprint

Gold--Liam Heath, Great Britain, 35.19 seconds

Silver--Maxime Beaumont, France, 35.36

Bronze--Saul Craviotto Rivero, Spain, 35.66

Bronze--Ronald Rauhe, Germany, 35.66

Men's canoe double 1,000-meter sprint

Gold--Germany (J. Vandrey and S. Brendel), 3:43.91

Silver--Brazil (I. Queiroz dos Santos and E. Silva), 3:44.81

Bronze--Ukraine (D. Ianchuk and T. Mishchuk), 3:45.94

Women's kayak four 500-meter sprint

Gold--Hungary (D. Kozák, G. Szabó, K. Fazekas Zur and T. Csipes), 1:31.48

Silver--Germany (S. Kriegerstein, S. Hering, T. Dietze and F. Weber), 1:32.38

Bronze--Belarus (M. Pautaran, M. Makhneva, N. Papok, V. Khudzenka), 1:33.90

Men's kayak four 1,000-meter sprint

Gold--Germany (M. Rendschmidt, T. Liebscher, M. Gross and M. Hoff), 3:02.14

Silver--Slovakia (T. Linka, D. Myšák, J. Tarr and E. Vlček), 3:05.04

Bronze--Czech Republic (D. Havel, J. Štěrba, J. Dostál and L. Trefil), 3:05.17

Cycling

Women's cross-country mountain bike final

Gold--Jenny Rissveds, Sweden, 1:30:15

Silver--Maja Włoszczowska, Poland, 1:30:52

Bronze--Catharine Pendrel, Canada, 1:31:41

Diving

Gold--Aisen Chen, China, 585.30 

Silver--German Sanchez, Mexico, 532.70 

Bronze--David Boudia, United States, 525.25

Golf (Women)

Gold--Inbee Park, South Korea, 268

Silver--Lydia Ko, New Zealand, 273

Bronze--Shanshan Feng, China, 274

Handball (Women)

Gold medal match

Russia 22, France 19 

Bronze medal match

Norway 36, Netherlands 26

Modern Pentathlon

Men's individual 

Gold--Alexander Lesun, Russia, 1,479 points (Olympic record)

Silver--Pavlo Tymoshchenko, Ukraine, 1,472

Bronze--Ismael Marcelo Hernandez Uscanga, Mexico, 1,468

Rhythmic Gymnastics

Gold--Margarita Mamun, Russia, 76.483

Silver--Yana Kudryavtseva, Russia, 75.608 

Bronze--Ganna Rizatdinova, Ukraine, 73.583

Soccer (Men)

Gold medal match

Brazil 1, Germany 1 (Brazil wins 5-4 on penalty kicks)

Bronze medal match

Nigeria 3, Honduras 2

Taekwondo

Men's 80 kilogram plus 

Gold--Radik Isaev, Azerbaijan, def. Abdoulrazak Issoufou Alfaga, Niger, 6-2

Bronze--Maicon Siqueira, Brazil, def. Mahama Cho, Britain, 5-4

Bronze--Dongmin Cha, South Korea, def. Dmitriy Shokin, Uzbekistan, 4-3

Women's 67 kilogram plus 

Gold--Shuyin Zheng, China, def. Maria del Rosario Espinoza Espinoza, Mexico, 5-1

Bronze--Bianca Walkden, Britain, def. Wiam Dislam, Morocco, 7-1

Bronze--Jackie Galloway, United States, def. Gwladys Epangue, France, 2-1

Track and Field

Men 

1,600 relay

Gold--United States (Arman Hall; Lashawn Merritt; Gil Roberts; Tony McQuay), 2:57.30

Silver--Jamaica (Javon Francis; Peter Matthews; Nathon Allen; Fitzroy Dunkley), 2:58.16

Bronze--Bahamas (Chris Brown; Alonzo Russell; Michael Mathieu; Steven Gardiner), 2:58.49

1,500 meters

Gold--Matthew Centrowitz, United States, 3:50.00

Silver--Taoufik Makhloufi, Algeria, 3:50.11

Bronze--Nicholas Willis, New Zealand, 3:50.24

5,000 meters

Gold--Mo Farah, Britain, 13:03.30

Silver--Paul Chelimo, United States, 13:03.90

Bronze--Hagos Gebrhiwet, Ethiopia, 13:04.35

Javelin

Gold--Thomas Rohler, Germany, 90.30 meters

Silver--Julius Yego, Kenya, 88.24

Bronze--Keshom Walcott, Trinidad and Tobago, 85.38

Women 

1,600-meter relay

Gold--United States (Allyson Felix; Courtney Okolo; Phyllis Francis; Natasha Hastings), 3:19.06

Silver--Jamaica (Anneisha McLaughlin-Whilby; Novlene Williams-Mills; Stephenie Ann McPherson; Shericka Jackson), 3:20.34

Bronze--Britain (Christine Ohuruogu; Emily Diamond; Anyika Onuora; Eilidh Doyle), 3:25.88

800 meters 

Gold--Caster Semenya, South Africa, 1:55.28

Silver--Francine Niyonsaba, Burund, 1:56.49

Bronze--Margaret Nyairera Wambui, Kenya, 1:56.89

High Jump 

Gold--Ruth Beitia, Spain, 1.97 meters 

Silver--Mirela Demireva, Bulgaria, 1.97 meters

Bronze--Blanka Vlasic, Croatia, 1.97 meters

Triathlon

Women's final

Gold--Gwen Jorgensen, United States, 1:56:16

Silver--Nicola Spirig, Switzerland, 1:56:56

Bronze--Vicky Holland, Great Britain, 1:57:01

Volleyball (Women)

Gold medal match

China d. Serbia, 3-1 (19-25, 25-17, 25-22, 25-23)

Bronze medal match

United States d. Netherlands, 3-1 (25-23, 25-27, 25-22, 25-19)

Water polo (Men)

Gold medal match

Serbia 11, Croatia 7

Bronze medal match

Italy 12, Montenegro 10

Spain 9, Brazil 8 (seventh place)

Hungary 12, Greece 10

Wrestling

Men

125 kilogram

Gold--Taha Akgul, Turkey, d. Komeil Ghasemi, Iran, 3-1

Bronze--Ibragim Saidov, Belarus, d. Levan Berianidze, Armenia, 3-1

Bronze--Geno Petriashvili, Georgia, d. Tervel Diagniv, United States, 4-0

86 kilogram

Gold--Abdulrashid Sadulaev, Russia, d. Selim Yasar, Turkey, 3-0

Bronze--J'Den Cox, United States, d. Reineris Salas, Cuba, 5-0

Bronze--Sharif Sharifov, Azerbajan, d. Pedro Francisco Ceballos Fuentes, Venezuela, 3-1 

Kyle Snyder becomes youngest American wrestler to win gold

USA's Kyle Snyder celebrates his gold medal over Azerbaijan's Khetag Goziumov i (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)
USA's Kyle Snyder celebrates his gold medal over Azerbaijan's Khetag Goziumov i (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)

American wrestler Kyle Snyder won gold on Sunday, becoming the youngest Olympic wrestling champion in U.S. history. 

The 20-year-old Snyder beat Khetag Goziumov of Azerbaijan, 2-1, for gold at 97 kilograms during the men's freestyle tournament on Sunday. 

Snyder is the second consecutive American wrestler to win Olympic gold in this weight class. Jake Varner, who Snyder beat at the U.S. Olympic team trials in April, won in London four years ago. 

Rio Olympics: Mongolian wrestling coaches strip in protest of loss

Mongolia wrestling coaches take off most of their clothes after wrestler Ganzorigiin Mandakhnaran lost his bronze medal match. (Jack Guez / AFP/Getty Images)
Mongolia wrestling coaches take off most of their clothes after wrestler Ganzorigiin Mandakhnaran lost his bronze medal match. (Jack Guez / AFP/Getty Images)

Two Mongolian wrestling coaches stripped in protest Sunday after their wrestler lost the bronze medal match.

The coaches had rushed to the mat in celebration minutes earlier at Carioca Arena, believing Ganzorigiin Mandakhnaran had defeated Uzbekistan’s Ikhtiyor Navruzov in the 143-pound (65 kg) class. One coach fell to his knees in the center of the mat and appeared to be sobbing.

But the judges awarded the Uzbekistan wrestler a penalty point — and the victory.

The sudden turn of events enraged the Mongolian coaches. One removed his shirt in front of the judges’ table and flexed. The other took off his shirt and pants, wearing only a pair of underwear.

"This was a protest," one of the coaches, Byambarenchin Bayaraa, said. "There was a problem with the refereeing.

"Three million people in Mongolian waited for this bronze medal and now we have no medal ... 100% of the stadium supported us."

The coaches piled their clothes on the table. The crowd, meanwhile, roared approval and chanted “Mon-gol-ia! Mon-gol-ia!”

Officials pushed both men off the mat after the display. They eventually put on their clothes before members of Brazil’s National Public Security Force escorted them from the venue as the crowd serenaded them with cheers.

Mandakhnaran, the Mongolian wrestler, remained fully clothed during the incident.

Silver medalist Feyisa Lilesa shows solidarity with protesters in Ethiopia

Ethiopia's Feyisa Lilesa crossed his arms above his head at the finish line (Olivier Morin / AFP/Getty Images)
Ethiopia's Feyisa Lilesa crossed his arms above his head at the finish line (Olivier Morin / AFP/Getty Images)

Feyisa Lilesa of Ethiopia was nearing the finish line at the men’s marathon on Sunday morning when he crossed his wrists above his head.

The silver medalist did it again. And once more at the end of an extraordinary news conference -- standing alone and posing for photographers -- in which he explained his show of solidarity with protesters in his homeland, Ethiopia.

He explained that the gesture was in protest of the killing of the Oromo people, saying he stands with the resistance movement, adding that the government was “killing our people.”

Lilesa was asked about the consequences of his protest. He said maybe “they kill me…if not they kill me, they put me in prison.”

Later, it was mentioned that the International Olympic Committee frowned upon political protests/gestures at the Games.

Said Lilesa: “They can’t do anything. It’s my feeling.”

 

 

 

Rio Olympics: Claressa Shields makes history with her second boxing gold

Claressa Shields fights her way to a gold medal over  Nouchka Fontijn of the Netherlands. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)
Claressa Shields fights her way to a gold medal over Nouchka Fontijn of the Netherlands. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

Claressa Shields became the first American boxer to earn two Olympic titles Sunday when she won a unanimous-decision victory over Nouchka Fontijn of the Netherlands in the women's middleweight final.

Shields dominated the Rio tournament, winning all 12 of her fights. And she may have been at her best in the gold-medal match. After a slow start, she took control of the fight early in the second round, staggering Fontijn with a strong right to the head.

She continued stalking the Dutch fighter in the third round, connecting twice with left jabs and landing another hard right. And rather than protect her big lead in the fourth round, she repeatedly waved her arms, begging Fontijn to come forward and fight.

Fontijn,who lost to Shields in the final of the world championship in May, was cheered Sunday by a huge contingent of orange-clad Dutch athletes and coaches. And she was game, landing a a couple of good punches in the opening two minutes. 

The victory ran Shields' record to 77-1, with her only loss coming before the London Games four years ago. It also closed a successful tournament for the U.S., which got a silver-medal performance from bantamweight Shakur Stevenson and a bronze-medal effort from light-flyweight Nico Hernandez.

The three medals are the most for a U.S. boxing team in the Olympics since 2000, when the Americans won four.

Rio Olympics: Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya wins men's marathon; Galen Rupp of the U.S. takes bronze

Eliud Kipchoge crosses the finish line. (Buda Mendes / Getty Images)
Eliud Kipchoge crosses the finish line. (Buda Mendes / Getty Images)

Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya continued his nearly flawless marathon career, winning the Olympic men’s marathon on Sunday in 2 hours 8 minutes 44 seconds.

Second was Feyisa Lilesa of Ethiopia and Galen Rupp of the United States took the bronze. Rupp’s 2:10:05 was a personal best. American Jared Ward was sixth, in 2:11:30, also a personal best. Meb Keflezighi of the U.S. was 33rd in 2:16:46.

Rupp was 11 seconds out of second place.

Kipchoge and Lilesa dropped Rupp at the 35-kilometer mark and then Kipchoge put on a patented surge himself and won by a margin of 1 minute 10 seconds.

Heading into Rio, the 31-year-old Kipchoge had lost just once in seven career marathons, at Berlin in 2013. Only three years ago, he moved up to the marathon distance.  

These two are trying to help seal the LA 2024 deal

Bill Hanway, left and Doug Arnot work behind the scenes at the Rio Olympics to try to deliver the Summer Games to L.A. in 2024. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)
Bill Hanway, left and Doug Arnot work behind the scenes at the Rio Olympics to try to deliver the Summer Games to L.A. in 2024. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

Olympic Stadium comes alive at dusk with fans arriving for the late session, lots of chatter and laughter, everyone eager to watch Usain Bolt in a 200-meter semifinal.

Beneath the stands, in a dank concourse, Doug Arnot and Bill Hanway emerge from a meeting that ran longer than expected. It has been another tough day and they look a bit haggard in their matching purple shirts.

“This is not glamorous,” Arnot says.

They are in Rio as paid consultants to help pitch Los Angeles’ bid for the 2024 Summer Games.

While Mayor Eric Garcetti and sports agent Casey Wasserman serve as the face of the campaign — schmoozing with International Olympic Committee members at cocktail receptions and private dinners — Arnot and Hanway do the grunt work.

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