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5 Wisconsin Turnovers Help Miami Win, 23-3

Associated Press

Carlos Huerta kicked 3 field goals and linebacker Bernard Clark returned a fumble 55 yards for a touchdown Saturday, helping the top-ranked Miami Hurricanes overcome 6 turnovers and beat winless Wisconsin, 23-3.

Miami’s Steve Walsh threw for 225 yards and a touchdown. The Hurricanes never managed a touchdown drive but still improved to 3-0 and have won 35 straight regular-season games.

Wisconsin (0-3) had 5 turnovers and has 15 in 3 games. Miami tackled Wisconsin runners for losses 11 times.

The Badgers trailed, 14-3, at halftime even though they had the ball for nearly 21 minutes. Wisconsin lost first-half fumbles at the Miami 17, the Miami 45 and the Badgers’ 26.

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Turnovers ended three of Miami’s first four possessions. The Hurricanes lost fumbles at the Wisconsin 38 and Miami 35, and defensive end Don Davey intercepted Walsh’s pass to halt a 62-yard Miami drive at the Badgers’ 28.

Miami reserves committed 3 turnovers in the fourth quarter.

The Hurricanes’ second fumble set up the game’s opening score. After Greg Thomas forced a fumble by Leonard Conley that Davey recovered, Rob Mehring kicked a 38-yard field goal.

Miami went ahead to stay early in the second quarter. Shane Curry’s hit forced a fumble by quarterback Tony Lowery, and Clark caught the ball in stride and ran untouched to the end zone.

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Miami scored again late in the second quarter, one play after Curry recovered a fumble by Marvin Artley. Walsh passed to Andre Brown alone in the back of the end zone for a 26-yard touchdown pass.

Walsh played three quarters and completed 16 of 27 passes with an interception.

In the third quarter, Miami marched 63 and 46 yards for field goals by Huerta. The freshman was successful from 21 and 34 yards. Huerta added a 30-yard field goal in the final period.

Miami held its opponent without a touchdown for the second time in three games. The game, the first between the schools in 30 years, drew a crowd of 48,311.

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