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SUPER BOWL BID : 3 Southland Cities to Make Joint Bid in an Effort to Land 1993 Super Bowl

Rather than try to outbid each other, the cities of Los Angeles, Pasadena and Anaheim have joined with the Los Angeles Sports Council to make a joint bid for the National Football League’s 1993 Super Bowl.

“Apparently, when the three cities submitted their bids for the 1991 Super Bowl, they knocked each other out, and the Super Bowl went to Tampa Bay,” David Simon, president of the Los Angeles Sports Council, said at a press conference Wednesday. “Through a long series of meetings, we were able to work out a cooperative effort.”

The council, which acts as a bidding agent for major sporting events, is coordinating the bid, which will be made either this year or next, depending on whether NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle decides to put both Super Bowl XXVI in 1992 and XXVII in 1993 on the agenda of the NFL owners’ meeting in February.

If the NFL does entertain both bids, the decision on the sites of the games will be made next May.

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The NFL already has selected sites for the next three Super Bowls: Miami in 1989; New Orleans in 1990 and Tampa Bay in 1991. The 1992 game is reportedly set for a domed stadium in the northern United States.

Should the joint effort be successful, representatives of Anaheim Stadium, the Rose Bowl and the Coliseum said the entire area would benefit and therefore each would be satisfied with whatever site the NFL might choose.

“The site itself doesn’t really benefit,” Coliseum General Manager Joel Ralph said. “It’s the region that benefits.”

Greg Smith, general manager of Anaheim Stadium, agreed. “When the Super Bowl was held at the Rose Bowl, the teams practiced in Orange County,” he said. “Hopefully, the NFL will make arrangements as to what the communities have to offer.”

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