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Steve Jobs’ Palo Alto home burglarized

Steve Jobs’ Palo Alto home that was burglarized last month for more than $60,000 worth of items has served as a mecca for Apple fans since his passing last year. But it was also an easy target.

The Apple co-founder’s home, which is located on a quiet street, was used by Apple fans immediately after his death as a gathering ground for vigils and memorials, but months after his passing, Apple users still kept visiting the home.

The Los Angeles Times reported earlier this year that people have taken trips from as far away as Hong Kong and Italy to stop by the home, which is easily accessible.

And that’s because Jobs made an effort not to seclude himself from normal life.

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His 5,768-square-foot home kept him connected to his customers and let his kids live in a neighborhood where they could walk to visit their friends.

But this also left the home a sitting duck.

Jobs’ home is just steps away from his neighbors’ and is really not walled off from the world, according to The Times report.

“I was surprised that anyone can just walk by,” said Anna Bonaccorso, a tourist who visited the home from New York earlier this year.

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And according to passages in Walter Isaacson’s book “Steve Jobs,” the home had no security guards and there were even times when Jobs would leave the backdoor unlocked during the day.

Santa Clara County Deputy Dist. Atty. Tom Flattery has said the robbery was “totally random” as far as the county can tell, but if the alleged burglar read the Isaacson book, he would have known just how simple it’d be to break in.

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