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Evacuation orders lifted as multiple wildfires burn in Northern California

Smoke rises from a fire on brush-covered hillsides.
Smoke rises from the Scenic fire burning in Contra Costa County on Thursday.
(Contra Costa County Fire Protection District)
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Firefighters are battling multiple wildfires in Northern California that prompted evacuations Thursday afternoon.

Crews worked overnight to get a handle on a fire in unincorporated Alameda County late Thursday and quickly spread across dry brush southeast of Livermore. The Tesla fire grew to 522 acres as of Friday morning and is 50% contained, according to California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

Evacuation orders for residents in the Sunol community of Alameda County near Pleasanton were lifted by about 7:30 p.m. as fire crews slowed the spread of the Canyon fire. The blaze covered 71 acres of grass and brush, and it was 20% contained as of 7:22 a.m. on Friday , according to the Cal Fire.

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In Contra Costa County, residents also faced evacuation orders and road closures due to the Scenic fire, which had grown to 140 acres in the Port Costa area. By Friday morning, the fire was downgraded to 120 acres and was 70% contained, according to Cal Fire. Evacuation orders for that fire were also lifted Thursday evening, Contra Costa County officials said.

And in Solano County, the Timm fire near Vacaville started Thursday afternoon and had burned 26 acres and was 80% contained as of 8 p.m., according to Cal Fire.

In Merced County, the Romero fire burned 422 acres near the unincorporated community of Santa Nella after it erupted Thursday morning. The fire was fully contained by Friday morning, officials said. The cause remains under investigation.

The blaze was contained after burning for about 90 minutes.

June 23, 2022

The afternoon sea breeze was pushing winds through the region, said Brooke Bingaman, senior forecaster with the National Weather Service in the Bay Area. But that breeze was also bringing more humidity, which could help firefighters contain the blazes.

“It’s a mixed bag,” Bingaman said.

Winds were expected to die down Thursday evening, she said.

Times staff writer Christian Martinez contributed to this report.

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