Photos: L.A.'s new 6th Street Viaduct, the long-awaited ‘Ribbon of Light,’ opens

Bridge with downtown skyline in background.
Los Angeles officials illuminate the new 6th Street Viaduct during a ceremony at dusk. The span, called the “Ribbon of Light,” replaces one of the city’s structural landmarks and connects Boyle Heights and the downtown Arts District.
(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
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It took years longer than expected and the final cost is well above original estimates, but the 6th Street Viaduct is finally opening. Los Angeles begins a three-day community celebration Friday to mark the completion of the six-year project dubbed the “Ribbon of Light,” a new connection between Boyle Heights and the downtown Arts District that replaces a landmark 1932 structure.

New bridge in Los Angeles
Drone photo of the new 6th Street Viaduct, the new four-lane span connecting Boyle Heights and the Arts District.
(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
 A person walks on the new bridge.
A pedestrian walks on the new $588-million span, which replaces a beloved Depression-era bridge that was demolished in 2016.
(Dania Maxwell / Los Angeles Times)

L.A. City Hall is framed by one of the arches of the new 6th Street Viaduct.
(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
6th Street Viaduct
Dubbed the “Ribbon of Light,” the $588-million 6th Street Viaduct is considered the most extensive bridge project in L.A. history.
(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
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Construction workers put the finishing touches on a ramp that serves as a pedestrian walkway to the new 6th Street Viaduct.
(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
Cement mason Jose Flores celebrates the completion of the new 6th Street Viaduct.
Cement mason Jose Flores celebrates the completion of the new 6th Street Viaduct. The project took six years to complete, with some delays due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
Los Angeles City Councilman Kevin de León rides a bike on the new 6th Street Viaduct.
Los Angeles City Councilman Kevin de León rides a bike on the new 6th Street Viaduct early Friday.
(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
Four politicians visit the new 6th Street Viaduct.
U.S. Rep. Jimmy Gomez (D-Los Angeles), from left, City Engineer Gary Lee Moore, L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti and L.A. City Councilman Kevin de León visit the new 6th Street Viaduct early Friday.
(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
Visitors make their way across the new 6th Street Viaduct.
Visitors make their way across the new 6th Street Viaduct early Friday. The four-lane bridge connects Boyle Heights and the Arts District, spanning the L.A. River, the 101 Freeway and railroad tracks.
(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
Two men walk across the new 6th Street Viaduct.
Boyle Heights residents Kevin Vasquez, left, and Rafael German, both 24, have mixed emotions about the new 6th Street Viaduct. “I’m happy because it looks nice,” German said. “But I’m also scared about the gentrification” it might bring to Boyle Heights.
(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
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6th Street Viaduct
The 6th Street Viaduct has a breadth of 3,060 feet.
(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
A jogger makes his way across the new 6th Street Viaduct.
A jogger makes his way across the new 6th Street Viaduct early Friday.
(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

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