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Letters to the Editor: Alito’s upside-down flag demands his recusal from 2020 election cases

Supreme Court Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. testifies before the House Appropriations Committee in 2019.
(Susan Walsh / Associated Press)
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To the editor: It is naive to assume that Supreme Court justices come to the court with a neutral political perspective. After all, they are human, and they are selected and appointed by politicians with clear political agendas. (“Upside-down flag controversy is the latest for Supreme Court Justice Alito,” May 20)

Nevertheless, once appointed, the justices owe the American public at least the appearance of impartiality and fairness.

That’s why the recent report of an upside-down American flag flying outside Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr.’s home in January 2021, the symbol of former President Trump’s “Stop the Steal” campaign, is so disturbing. Even worse, Alito blaming this on his wife shows a lack of accountability.

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By any reasonable ethical standard, Alito must recuse himself from any court case involving the 2020 election. Failure to do so would further erode the public’s confidence in the Supreme Court and weaken our democracy.

Gary Vogt, Menifee

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To the editor: Last week illustrated the double standard that many well-known Republicans carry.

With the photographic evidence of bias at the Alito home first reported on Friday, we have what should clearly stand as a reason for Alito to recuse himself from certain high-profile cases before the Supreme Court. While Alito’s transgression pales in comparison to those of Justice Clarence Thomas, the flying of an upside-down flag demands recusal.

Also last week, a number of high-profile Republican politicians went to New York to observe Trump’s hush money trial. Outside the courtroom, some protested that Judge Juan Merchan should be removed from the case because of his daughter’s political activities.

Funny that they have been quiet about Thomas’ improprieties. Now, they are ignoring evidence of Alito’s bias.

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Robert Bachmann, Los Angeles

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