Advertisement

Why we need inclusionary zoning to address the affordable housing crisis

To the editor: Economics professor Gary M. Galles offers no credible solutions to address an unparalleled affordable housing crisis that threatens California's economy and harms families struggling to make ends meet. ("How affordable housing mandates make housing more expensive," Opinion, Jan. 4)

Inclusionary zoning policies — which set aside a small percentage of new construction for affordable housing — are a cost-effective, market-based solution widely supported by builders, cities, housing advocates and many employers. They are an essential part of the mix of solutions we will need going forward.

Advertisement

With the loss of redevelopment agencies in 2011, local inclusionary housing programs are one of the last viable tools we have left to put homes within reach of workers in our communities. There is scant evidence these policies have an effect on the supply or cost of market-rate housing.

Our organizations and others stand ready to actually help begin building the 1.5 million affordable homes our state needs. California's working families can't live in homes made of platitudes.

Alan Greenlee, Los Angeles

Ray Pearl, Agoura Hills

Greenlee is executive director of the Southern California Assn. of Non-Profit Housing; Pearl is executive director of the California Housing Consortium.

Follow the Opinion section on Twitter @latimesopinion and Facebook

Advertisement
Advertisement