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Who will be Donald Trump's veep? Don't be surprised if he picks his daughter

Who will be Donald Trump's veep? Don't be surprised if he picks his daughter
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie listens as Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a news conference before a rally in Fort Worth, Texas, on Feb. 26. (LM Otero / Associated Press)

To the editor: Let Donald Trump go with Newt Gingrich as his running mate. Then they wouldn't be able to attack Hillary Clinton for her husband's impeachment as president, considering Gingrich lost the House speakership over his infidelity, the same reason Gingrich was trying to remove Bill Clinton from office. The media would love it. ("Help wanted: A veep for Donald Trump," Opinion, June 19)

Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) has fought against rights for women, LGBT people and immigrants — great for a GOP running mate.

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As Doyle McManus indicates, Gov. Chris Christie is losing popularity in New Jersey. He also sold out to President Obama, according to many Republicans.

As the rumor mill churns, Trump could just keep the VP slot in the family and go with his daughter.

Lloyd Fradkin, Newhall

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To the editor: McManus warns any vice presidential candidate seeking to serve the presumptive Republican nominee to be ready to "roll with the punches." And he reminds a candidate that he will be serving under a leader who proudly ignores advice and who has a proven mercurial personality that "provokes needless crises without warning."

That's a timely warning.

Meanwhile, in the same day's Business section, Joyce Russell's "On Leadership" column warns readers that research shows 90% of successful leaders manage their emotions and stay calm and in control during times of stress. Such proven leaders also have a healthy sense of humor about life and don't take themselves too seriously. They admit mistakes, apologize and use more positive than negative language in dealing with others.

The warnings continue.

June Maguire, Mission Viejo

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To the editor: Trump is a blowhard, but as a populist he is unwilling to attack Social Security and Medicare.

On the other hand, as McManus notes, House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), the cerebral darling of "establishment" Republicans, is "passionate about cutting future spending on Social Security and Medicare."

Such is today's Republican Party.

Few American households can count on a traditional pension nowadays, and the idea that 401(k)s or IRAs can take up the slack is ludicrous. An annuitized $100,000 in retirement assets might yield about $5,000 a year in income. With the median household income at around $54,000, how can anyone expect families to pay for necessities and also set aside a meaningful amount for retirement? It's not surprising 50% of households have no retirement savings at all.

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Medicare and Social Security are the last bulwarks against ill health and grinding poverty. They must be supported and fortified.

Grace Bertalot, Anaheim

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