Opinion

Readers React: A bill in Congress could save us from the worst of climate change

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Apartment buildings sit perilously close to the eroding coastal cliffs of Pacifica, Calif., just south of San Francisco, on Jan. 20.
(Los Angeles Times)

To the editor: I applaud the L.A. Times for publishing an entire section about our vanishing coastline. Apparently, it will take a combination of retreat from the coast and fortification of the coastline, all of it very costly.

When we talk about the cost to mitigate climate change, we try to ignore the cost of doing nothing. That bill will eventually come due.

While some of the effects of climate change are already here, we still have an opportunity to minimize the damage. We must reduce our dependence on carbon-based fuels as rapidly as possible, and the most effective way to do so is by pricing carbon.

There’s a proposal in Congress to do just that: HR 763, the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act.

Larry Kramer, San Juan Capistrano

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To the editor: The Times’ special report showed how rising sea levels threaten railroad lines and homes. A separate article showed the threat to Oceanside beaches and seafront. That story noted: “The Coastal Commission tends to frown upon seawalls and other structures meant to combat erosion.”

While stabilizing a cliff or building a seawall is not always the wisest way to combat erosion, it surely should be considered a viable option.

The Coastal Commission is an example of an unelected agency taking more and more power over homeowners and local governments. People who voted to create the Coastal Commission in 1972 did not envision a group that would refuse to allow owners to maintain walls to protect their homes.

Important issues like this should be addressed by the elected Legislature, not an appointed commission.

Steve Murray, Huntington Beach

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To the editor: Let’s stop all this frantic emergency climate chatter. Instead, just stop eating meat. It’s one of the biggest causes of climate change.

Unless the people talking about climate change stop eating meat, they are just blowing hot air. I recently celebrated 30 years of not eating meat or fish.

Susan M. Tellem, Malibu

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