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Opinion

Letters to the Editor: Mass shootings are not a ‘blame both sides’ kind of problem

El Paso
A memorial for the victims of the Aug. 3 mass shooting in El Paso.
(Associated Press)

To the editor: I rarely agree with columnist Jonah Goldberg, but I generally respect his intellect. With his latest piece, however, he really went off the deep end. (“America is sick, and both liberals and conservatives are wrong about the remedy,” Opinion, Aug. 6)

Quoting two intellectual conservatives’ views on “nationalism” and then extrapolating their thoughts to include the xenophobic, bigoted and self-destructive views of President Trump’s nationalism is a disservice to those intellectuals, and more importantly it improperly elevates Trumpists as legitimate social thinkers.

Those on the “progressive” left are seeking social unity and inclusion of all people into their egalitarian dream. Those on the far-right fringe seek division of society and exclusion of “others” whom they openly and vehemently disrespect and debase.

Perhaps neither holds the cure for “America’s sickness” (Goldberg’s words), but to compare the two as equal, legitimate and broadly accepted positions is no better than saying “there are fine people on both sides.”

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James Zimring, Tarzana

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To the editor: Goldberg tells us that the shooting in El Paso — where a man used a military-style semiautomatic weapon to hunt down immigrants, killing 22 and injuring more than 26 — had “at least as much to do” with the fact that 1 out of 5 millennials report having no friends as it has to do with “white supremacy or video games.”

Is he serious?

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Bob Olive, Valley Glen

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To the editor: Goldberg mentions that millennials are a lonely bunch.

My advice? Throw away your smartphones, remove your ear buds and go to your neighborhood bar. Start a conversation with the bartender. In time he or she will introduce you to the patrons nearby if you don’t know how to engage.

Once you find yourself opening up, you will begin the process of touching another human soul and perhaps make a friend. You might even find yourself having a good time, and a good time relieves loneliness.

Dell Franklin, Cayucos, Calif.


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