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In 'This Changes Everything,' Naomi Klein sounds climate alarm

Naomi Klein has made a career critiquing the effects of global capital and consumerism. Her 2000 book "No Logo" looked at the exploitation of workers by large multinationals, including Nike; her follow-up, "The Shock Doctrine" (2007), examined the ways in which corporations benefit from...

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  • 'Why Football Matters' versus 'Against Football'
    'Why Football Matters' versus 'Against Football'

    Unlike Steve Almond and Mark Edmundson, the authors of two terrific new books on football, I did not grow up with a father who loved the sport.

  • Women's paths diverge in Elena Ferrante's epic 'Those Who Leave'
    Women's paths diverge in Elena Ferrante's epic 'Those Who Leave'

    I first encountered Elena Ferrante's fierce, singular voice in her second novel, "The Days of Abandonment," an unrelenting exploration of a woman whose husband has left her. In her newest novel, "Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay," the third of her quartet of...

  • In 'Bone Clocks,' David Mitchell ties his universes together
    In 'Bone Clocks,' David Mitchell ties his universes together

    We enter David Mitchell's new novel, "The Bone Clocks," through a conventional door: Holly Sykes, a mouthy British teenager in 1984, is sleeping with an older guy and spending time with a bad-news best friend. After a fight she decides to take off, a short runaway jag, the kind...

  • Sci-fi and fantasy authors reveal truths in the strangest fiction
    Sci-fi and fantasy authors reveal truths in the strangest fiction

    Writers of realistic fiction are often are asked to wrestle with the question of autobiographical influence in interviews and essays. Some critics have made a cottage industry out of guessing even in the absence of hard data: Is the character a stand-in for the novelist? Is the plot based on...

  • 'Doom Patrol Omnibus' shows Grant Morrison's master plan
    'Doom Patrol Omnibus' shows Grant Morrison's master plan

    Before Grant Morrison was a huge name in mainstream comic books — the writer of series like "New X-Men," "All-Star Superman" and the forthcoming "Multiversity" — he was the brilliant weirdo who wrote "Doom Patrol." Morrison and artist...

  • Into the ether with Greil Marcus' ' History of Rock 'n' Roll'
    Into the ether with Greil Marcus' ' History of Rock 'n' Roll'

    "Once a song has gone into the ether, it never disappears," Greil Marcus remarks in "The History of Rock 'n' Roll in Ten Songs." But it never reappears in quite the same form, either. A song like "Money (That's What I Want)" means something...

  • Steph Cha's 'Beware' enters modern-day Hollywood noir shining darkly
    Steph Cha's 'Beware' enters modern-day Hollywood noir shining darkly

    Since Nathanael West's 1939 novel, "The Day of the Locust," scores of writers have succumbed to the siren song of the Hollywood novel. The call is particularly alluring for crime writers, each of whom brings to the task his (or, less often, her) unique sensibilities. Of late...

  • Small things add up in Matthew Thomas' 'We Are Not Ourselves'
    Small things add up in Matthew Thomas' 'We Are Not Ourselves'

    Matthew Thomas' first novel, "We Are Not Ourselves," is an epic of small events. By that I don't mean its story is insignificant but quotidian: the particular struggles of the day-to-day. A family saga, spanning three generations, the book is centered around Eileen...

  • 'Your Face in Mine' a bold take on race, identity by Jess Row
    'Your Face in Mine' a bold take on race, identity by Jess Row

    Late in his novel "Your Face in Mine," Jess Row cites a parable attributed to Zhuangzi, a Chinese philosopher from the fourth century BC. "Zhuangzi awoke from dreaming that he was a butterfly," he writes, "… And didn't know whether he was a butterfly...

  • 'How the World Was' a vivid tale of a 20th century California boyhood
    'How the World Was' a vivid tale of a 20th century California boyhood

    The Parisian artist Emmanuel Guibert creates nonfiction graphic novels that have the emotional weight and patient observation of great prose fiction. Many of his books are based on long interviews with real subjects. "The Photographer" told the story of a French medical mission into...

  • Rene Steinke's 'Friendswood' visits a town toxic in many ways
    Rene Steinke's 'Friendswood' visits a town toxic in many ways

    René Steinke doesn't like to repeat herself. Her debut novel, "The Fires," drew readers into the mind of a pyromaniac through a haunting first-person narration. Her second, "Holy Skirts," sympathetically reimagined a marginal figure in the early 20th century...

  • 'The Invisible Soldiers' warns of private security forces' rise
    'The Invisible Soldiers' warns of private security forces' rise

    Near the end of "The Invisible Soldiers: How America Outsourced Our Security," author Ann Hagedorn recommends that President Dwight D. Eisenhower's famous warning in 1961 about the rise of the "military-industrial complex" should be updated.

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