Politics

His tweets have the power to shape international relations, send stock prices up — or down — and galvanize the American public.

We're watching how Donald Trump is using this platform of unfettered communication now that he’s commander in chief. Here is everything Trump has tweeted since he was sworn in as 45th president of the United States. In many cases, we look at what he was reacting to and whether what he said was accurate. And, as much as possible, we'll relate what else was going on at the time. Check back for more as Trump continues to tweet.

Daily summary

Trump's day in tweets: Monday, June 26

President Trump listens as Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House on Monday. (Evan Vucci / Associated Press)
President Trump listens as Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House on Monday. (Evan Vucci / Associated Press)

President Trump tweeted about:

  • His attack on former President Obama over his reported handling of Russia's alleged attempts to influence voters
  • His attack on congressional Democrats, whom he blamed for obstructing the Senate Republican healthcare bill
  • His celebration of the Supreme Court's revival of part of his travel ban
  • The president retweeted a message sent by the official White House account welcoming Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi
  • After the Congressional Budget Office released its analysis of the Senate healthcare bill, Trump also retweeted a message sent by the White House noting that, when it came to Obamacare, the CBO's initial estimate of the number of people who would be insured by 2017 was not accurate

Trump did not tweet about:

AccoladesCourtsImmigrationTravel ban

Trump celebrates after Supreme Court revives part of his travel ban

President Trump issued a pair of celebratory tweets Monday after the Supreme Court handed him a partial victory by reviving part of his disputed ban on foreign travelers from six Muslim-majority nations.

Everything President Trump has tweeted about the travel ban>>

The justices in an unsigned opinion largely rejected a series of lower court orders that had blocked most of Trump’s policy from taking effect. They also agreed to hear the legal dispute in the fall.

The court’s order has the look of a compromise. It allows Trump’s order to go into effect, but not for “foreign nationals who have a credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States,” such as a spouse, a close relative, an employer or enrollment in a university.

Domestic policyHealthcareInsultsPolitics and polls

As Senate GOP scrambles to pass Obamacare repeal, Trump lashes out at Democrats

Senate Republican leaders are scrambling to lock down votes to advance their Obamacare repeal bill this week before Congress adjourns for its July 4 recess.

Five GOP senators have said publicly they oppose the measure as written; the defection of only three Republicans would be enough to sink it.

But in tweets on Monday, President Trump lashed out at congressional Democrats, branding them "obstructionists" and accusing them of providing "no help" in bringing the bill to a vote.

Democrats, who have said they would be willing to work with the GOP to fix but not scrap the act known as Obamacare, declared that the Senate measure would inflict far-reaching harm on low- and middle-income Americans, as well as the elderly.

Failure to pass the bill would represent a high-profile setback for Trump at a time when his White House is increasingly beleaguered over the widening probe of Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential campaign.

But even as Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) continued to push for a speedy vote, one key GOP centrist, Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, said she doubted there would be a swift resolution.

"It's hard for me to see the bill passing this week," she said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week.” Collins, who has expressed particular concern over funding for Planned Parenthood, said she wanted to see the Congressional Budget Office’s “score” of the measure, which would outline its projected effects.

The president also retweeted a message from the White House Twitter account stating that Obamacare "has led to higher costs and fewer health insurance options for millions of Americans" and linking to a video that lists the ways in which the act has "failed."

Several hours later, the Congressional Budget Office released its analysis of the Senate GOP's Obamacare repeal bill.

The report estimated that the measure would increase the number of people in the U.S. without health coverage by 22 million and push up medical costs for millions of other poor and sick Americans.

Fox NewsObamaPolitics and pollsRussiaThe Clintons

In tweets on Russian meddling, Trump defends himself, attacks Obama and seeks to redefine 'obstruction'

President Trump unleashed a series of tweets Monday in which he appeared to place the blame for Russian meddling in U.S. politics onto former President Obama.

Trump, who has a long history of deflecting criticism from himself to others, seemed to be trying to redefine what it means to collude or obstruct as he pushed back against an investigation into whether Trump's own team colluded with Russian officials during the campaign and transition.

Trump appeared to be referencing a Washington Post report about the Obama administration's handling of Russia's alleged attempts to influence voters in which some officials questioned whether the former president had done enough to stop Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Obama ordered a review of Russia's actions and imposed new sanctions after the Nov. 8 election.

As president, Trump has frequently disparaged the Russia probe as a "witch hunt" promoted by Democrats. Monday's tweets appeared aimed at delegitimizing some of the allegations frequently hurled at him by his political opponents.

Everything President Trump has tweeted about the Clintons>>

Wayne Fields, a Washington University professor who has studied political rhetoric, said Trump appeared to be co-opting terms like "collusion" and "obstruction" as part of a larger strategy to "invalidate" some of the arguments made against him.

"You take words and you do everything you can to make them meaningless," Fields said. "You take any kind of precision out of public discourse so it can't be used against you."

Peter Henning, a law professor at Wayne State University in Detroit who has written about public corruption, said Trump appeared to be taking the term "obstruction," which means impeding an investigation, and applying it to a decision by his predecessor not to pursue an investigation as vigorously as possible.

"Inaction is not an obstruction, but of course it has some potency as a political attack," Henning said.

Everything President Trump has tweeted about Obama>>

Asked about the comments, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer told reporters there were "some serious questions" about what the Obama administration "did or did not do in terms of acting" after evidence of Russian meddling surfaced during the campaign.

"Obviously, I don't have all the understanding of what they knew or when they knew it, but there does seem to be a bit of hypocrisy in terms of what they didn't clearly do if they truly believe all of this was happening," Spicer said. "If they did know all this, then they clearly do know that there wasn't a collusion."

Trump resumed the attack Monday night in a tweet that cited Fox News.

Trump appeared to refer to a report that aired Monday night on Fox News' "The Five" under the banner, "Bombshell: In 2016, Obama dismissed idea that anyone could rig an American election."

The segment recapped the Washington Post article and aired comments from Democrats critical of the Obama administration's reported response to Russia's meddling.

The episode then showed a clip of Obama speaking in October at a Rose Garden news conference, where he rebuked then-candidate Trump for sowing suspicion about the integrity of America's presidential vote.

"There is no serious person out there who would suggest somehow that you could even rig America's elections, in part because they're so decentralized and the number of votes involved," Obama said then. "There's no evidence that that has happened in the past or that there are instances in which that will happen this time, and so I would invite Mr. Trump to stop whining and go try to make his case to get votes."

Trump's last tweet came less than an hour after the White House issued a stern warning to Syrian President Bashar Assad, as it claimed to have identified "potential" evidence that Syria was preparing for another chemical weapons attack.

Daily summary

Trump's day in tweets: Sunday, June 25

President Trump's motorcade arrives at the Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, Va., on June 25, 2017. (Jim Lo Scalzo / European Pressphoto Agency)
President Trump's motorcade arrives at the Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, Va., on June 25, 2017. (Jim Lo Scalzo / European Pressphoto Agency)

President Trump tweeted about:

  • His accusation that Hillary Clinton engaged in collusion in order to win last year's Democratic presidential nomination

Trump did not tweet about:

InsultsPolitics and pollsRussiaThe Clintons

Trump returns to campaign-style rhetoric with attack on Hillary Clinton

President Trump, in a return to campaign-style rhetoric, on Sunday accused Hillary Clinton of engaging in collusion in order to win last year's Democratic presidential nomination.

The presidential statement, issued on Twitter, did not refer directly to a broad-ranging investigation by a special counsel as to whether his own campaign had colluded in the Russian election meddling documented by U.S. intelligence agencies.

But the tweet implied -- as Trump has repeatedly insisted in recent months -- that he is being unfairly maligned over events during and after the 2016 campaign.

In keeping with another of his online habits, Trump coupled a personal attack on an individual with a claim of support. In this instance, he referred to Clinton’s rival for the nomination as “Crazy Bernie Sanders” but also asserted that the Vermont senator had not been allowed to fairly contest the Democratic nomination.

Aides, GOP lawmakers and legal advisors have reportedly implored Trump to stop talking about the Russia investigation on Twitter, even indirectly.

Daily summary

Trump's day in tweets: Saturday, June 24

First Lady Melania Trump, President Trump, Treasury Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin, Louise Linton, Vice President Mike Pence and Karen Pence at Mnuchin's wedding in Washington on June 24, 2017. (Kevin Mazur / Getty Images)
First Lady Melania Trump, President Trump, Treasury Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin, Louise Linton, Vice President Mike Pence and Karen Pence at Mnuchin's wedding in Washington on June 24, 2017. (Kevin Mazur / Getty Images)

President Trump tweeted about:

  • His criticism of Obamacare and of Democrats' opposition to the Senate Republican bill to roll it back
  • His criticism of the Obama administration's response to Russian meddling in the 2016 election
  • His apparent belief that Republican senators will support the healthcare bill rather than continuing to "allow the American people to suffer"

Trump did not tweet about:

ObamaPolitics and pollsRussiaThe Clintons

Trump again faults Obama for Russian election meddling

For the second time in as many days, President Trump took aim at his predecessor, former President Obama, for what Trump said was a failure to act on intelligence that Russia was meddling in the 2016 election.

Trump appeared to quote from a Washington Post report detailing the Obama administration's struggle to decide how to punish Russia for its alleged interference in the U.S. presidential election. “I feel like we sort of choked,” a former Obama administration official told the paper in describing those deliberations.

The Post report stated that the CIA informed Obama in August that Russian President Vladimir Putin was directly involved in a hacking campaign to disrupt the election by defeating Hillary Clinton and helping to elect Trump.

The Obama administration responded by issuing a series of warnings to Russia and later approved a package of punitive measures that included economic sanctions. Obama also authorized the planting of cyberweapons in Russia's infrastructure in a measure that was still in its planning stages when he left office, according to the Post report.

The Obama administration first publicly announced Russia's alleged election meddling on Oct. 7 but stopped short of saying that the efforts were aimed at helping Trump win.

Administration officials did not act more forcefully against Russia in the days leading up to the Nov. 8 election because they believed that their warnings had been sufficient to compel the country to abandon any plans of further aggression, and because they were concerned that any action could be perceived as political interference in an already heated campaign, according to the Post.

Everything President Trump has tweeted about Russia>>

That concern was heightened, the report noted, by the fact that, as a candidate, Trump had already predicted that the election would be rigged and suggested that he might not accept the legitimacy of the results. The Obama administration's assumption that Clinton would be the victor also contributed to its lack of urgency, according to the Post.

Trump made similar comments the day before, tweeting that the Obama administration knew of Russia's activities "far in advance" of the election but took no action.

That came after Trump had for months maintained that reports of Russian election meddling amounted to "a scam" cooked up by Democrats as an excuse for losing the election.

His latest tweets came as the Justice Department and at least four congressional committees continue to investigate Russia's alleged election interference, including possible ties between Russia and members of Trump's campaign team.

Trump has repeatedly decried those investigations as "a witch hunt."

Domestic policyHealthcarePolitics and polls

Trump pushes Senate GOP healthcare bill

In tweets on Saturday, President Trump championed Senate Republicans' draft bill to roll back the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare.

The legislative outline unveiled Thursday, which Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s team wrote largely behind closed doors, includes a drastic reduction in federal healthcare spending that threatens to leave millions more Americans uninsured, drive up costs for poor consumers and further destabilize the nation’s health insurance markets.

Democrats emerged in unified opposition to the legislation, which also drew quick condemnation from across the nation’s healthcare system and from leading consumer advocates.

Though the Senate draft has not yet been analyzed by the Congressional Budget Office, it hews closely to the Obamacare repeal bill passed last month by House Republicans.

The budget office projected the House bill would cause insurance deductibles to rise. Average premiums for those who buy their own coverage would be lower in some states after 2020 than under Obamacare, but the decrease would be driven largely driven by the fact that more people would have plans that cover fewer benefits and shift more costs to consumers, budget analysts wrote.

Older and poorer Americans would also see higher premiums under the House bill, according to the budget office.

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) said Thursday that by slashing taxes on the wealthy and cutting healthcare for the poor, "the Senate version of Trumpcare is even meaner than the House bill.”

After McConnell released the text of the draft healthcare legislation to a closed-door meeting of Senate Republicans on Thursday, four conservatives — Sens. Ted Cruz of Texas, Mike Lee of Utah, Ron Johnson of Wisconsin and Rand Paul of Kentucky — announced their opposition.

"It looks a lot like Obamacare, actually," Paul said of the draft.

On Friday, a fifth Republican senator — Nevada's Dean Heller — said that he planned to vote against the bill.

Heller said that his chief reason for opposing the legislation was its deep reductions in federal support for Medicaid, but he also cited the bill's impact on treatment for opioid addiction and the likelihood that the plan would fail to reduce premiums.

"There isn't anything in this piece of legislation that will lower your premiums," he said, contradicting one of the main arguments that supporters of the bill have made.

Several more centrist senators, including Sens. Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Rob Portman of Ohio and Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia, have voiced similar concerns.

Collins and Portman have both said they want to review the analysis of the bill from the Congressional Budget Office before making up their minds. The budget office has said it will release that assessment early next week.

Daily summary

Trump's day in tweets: Friday, June 23

President Trump celebrates his signing of the Department of Veterans Affairs Accountability and Whistleblower Protection Act of 2017 at the White House on Friday, June 23, 2017. (Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images)
President Trump celebrates his signing of the Department of Veterans Affairs Accountability and Whistleblower Protection Act of 2017 at the White House on Friday, June 23, 2017. (Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images)

President Trump tweeted about:

  • His appearance on "Fox & Friends"
  • His legislative achievements, which he says were made despite little support from Democrats
  • His signing of a bill that will ease restrictions on the discipline and termination of employees from the Department of Veterans Affairs
  • His weekly address
  • Russia's interference in the 2016 presidential election, which he appeared to both acknowledge and blame on his predecessor 

Trump did not tweet about:

ObamaPolitics and pollsRussia

Trump appears to acknowledge Russian election meddling – and blames Obama

For months, he decried as a "witch hunt" the assessment of 17 intelligence agencies that blame Russia for meddling in the 2016 election.

On Friday, President Trump appeared to to acknowledge that the country did, in fact, interfere.

In a tweet, he blamed his predecessor, writing that President Obama knew of Russia's efforts before the Nov. 8 election but did nothing to stop them.

It wasn't immediately clear exactly what inspired the president's tweet.

It came several hours after the publication of a Washington Post report detailing the Obama administration's fight to punish Russia for its alleged election interference.

That report stated that the CIA informed Obama of Russia's hacking efforts last August, and that his administration chose to respond by approving a package of sanctions against the country in late December. Obama also authorized the planting of cyber weapons in Russia's infrastructure in a previously undisclosed measure that was still in its planning stages when he left office, according to the report.

The Obama administration first publicly announced Russia's alleged meddling on Oct. 7, issuing a statement officially blaming the country for hacking computers used by political groups with the goal of interfering with the election process.

Jeh Johnson, the former secretary of Homeland Security, described a similar timeline of events in his testimony before the House Intelligence Committee on Wednesday.

Johnson said that the FBI found evidence of Russian hacking attempts by August, but that Obama administration officials were concerned they'd be blamed for a partisan attempt to influence the election results if they revealed those attempts before Nov. 8.

His schedule

His weekly address

President Trump tweeted a video of his weekly address, which centered on healthcare legislation.

In his remarks, Trump said that the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, has been "wreaking havoc" on the nation's healthcare system, and that "millions more" would be hurt by its "deepening death spiral."

"It really is a disaster," he continued. "The American people are calling out for relief, and my administration is determined to provide it. And we are working with Congress to get a bill on my desk so we can rescue Americans from this catastrophe."

The day before, Senate Republicans unveiled a draft bill to roll back Obamacare, including a drastic reduction in federal healthcare spending that threatens to leave millions more Americans uninsured, drive up costs for poor consumers and further destabilize the nation’s health insurance markets.

In his address, Trump went on to call for congressional Democrats to muster the political courage to support the measure, "instead of obstructing, always obstructing change."

But, he assured the public, "we'll get it done even if we don't have any help from the Democrats."

At the time of his remarks, five Republican senators had already stepped forward to voice opposition to the Senate healthcare measure, and it remained unclear whether it would get the votes needed for passage.

AccoladesDomestic policyFox NewsHis schedule

Trump signs VA reform bill

President Trump signed into law Friday a bill that will ease restrictions on the discipline and termination of employees from the troubled Department of Veterans Affairs.

The Accountability and Whistleblower Protection Act of 2017 is designed to speed up the process to discipline an employee for misconduct and put more decision-making power in the hands of Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin.

The act is in response to the 2014 VA scandals involving long wait times for medical care and attempts by VA employees to cover up the delays.

Trump, who promised to improve healthcare for veterans during his campaign, said the bill was one of the largest reforms to the VA in its history and is “essential to making sure our veterans are treated with respect.”

AccoladesDomestic policyPolitics and polls

Trump celebrates his achievements — made without Democratic support

President Trump touted his achievements, tweeting that he has signed 38 bills despite little support from Democrats.

The president's Friday signing of a bill that will make it easier to discipline and fire Department of Veterans Affairs employees brought the number of laws he's enacted to 40, according to a report from NPR.

But of those laws, few created substantive legislative change. As NPR noted, 15 of them reversed Obama-era rules and regulations. Others renamed federal buildings, provided for the creation of memorials or were related to personnel or government spending.

Many of Trump's more consequential policy initiatives have not been realized. His plan to suspend the entry of foreign travelers from six Muslim-majority nations remains blocked, pending a Supreme Court ruling, and he has so far been unable to secure funding for his promised border wall with Mexico.

With Republicans in control of both the House and Senate, support from Democrats is not necessary for legislation to advance.

Still, House Republicans only narrowly passed a bill that would fulfill a key campaign promise to roll back the Affordable Care Act, with 20 Republicans defecting to vote against the measure.

Senate Republicans this week unveiled their own draft healthcare legislation that is similar to the House bill, but contains important differences. Five senators have already announced their opposition to that draft, and it remains unclear whether the measure will get the votes needed for passage.

Fox NewsHis scheduleJames Comey

Trump promotes appearance on 'Fox & Friends'

President Trump called it “bothersome” that the special counsel now overseeing the Russia probe was “good friends” with fired FBI Director James B. Comey, and said he hinted at having tapes of his private conversations — apparently falsely — to try to influence Comey's eventual testimony.

The president made his remarks during an interview that aired Friday morning on “Fox & Friends," but was recorded on Thursday just hours after he tweeted that he did not, in fact, have tapes. Trump said that floating the possibility they did exist might have forced Comey "to tell what actually took place at the events."

“When he found out that, I, you know, that there may be tapes out there, whether it’s governmental tapes or anything else, and who knows, I think his story may have changed,” Trump said. “My story didn’t change. My story was always a straight story.”

Fox’s Ainsley Earhardt followed up: “So it was a smart way to make sure he stayed honest in those hearings?”

“It wasn’t very stupid, I can tell you that,” Trump answered.

Many disagree, including Republicans. Comey testified that Trump’s tweet is what prompted him to ask a friend to slip contemporaneous memos of his conversations with Trump to reporters, to “get that out into the public square.”

In his accounts and his subsequent testimony to Congress, Comey conveyed his concerns that the president was asking him to drop the various Russia-related investigations, a request suggestive of obstruction of justice, and that Trump might lie about their encounters.

Daily summary

Trump's day in tweets: Thursday, June 22

President Trump, flanked by First Lady Melania Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and wife Karen Pence, speaks at the congressional picnic at the White House on Thursday, June 22, 2017. (Alex Brandon / Associated Press)
President Trump, flanked by First Lady Melania Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and wife Karen Pence, speaks at the congressional picnic at the White House on Thursday, June 22, 2017. (Alex Brandon / Associated Press)

President Trump tweeted about:

  • His thanks to Iowa after he spoke at a rally there
  • The assessment of 17 U.S. intelligence agencies that Russia meddled in the 2016 election, which he appeared to doubt
  • His hope that Democrats won't force out House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
  • His disclosure that he does not have tapes of his conversations with former FBI Director James B. Comey
  • The government's ongoing efforts to arrest suspected MS-13 gang members
  • The need for a border wall after a report ranked Mexico as the world's second-deadliest country
  • His support for Senate Republicans' draft healthcare bill
  • Well wishes for Rep. Steve Scalise (R-La.)
  • His hosting of the congressional picnic
  • The president retweeted a message from Fox News' Fox Nation that linked to a video clip of an interview with Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), who told reporters that the Senate healthcare bill doesn't do enough to address rising premiums, but that he's confident lawmakers will be able to "get to 'yes'" after negotiations
  • Trump also retweeted a message from Fox News' "Fox & Friends" that linked to a video report debating whether he'd be justified in saying "I told you so" after predicting the current upswing in American home values in a June 2012 tweet

Trump did not tweet about:

AccoladesHis schedule

Trump calls for unity while hosting congressional picnic

President Trump and his wife, Melania, hosted their first congressional picnic Thursday, with the president using the convivial evening to pay tribute to Rep. Steve Scalise (R-La.), hospitalized after being seriously wounded in a shooting last week.

Trump also paid tribute to the spirit of "unity" that was on display the next night at the annual congressional charity baseball game and declared that more of it was needed in a nation's capital so often divided by partisan rancor.

"It's our hope that the unity that was displayed that evening can maybe continue to grow and thrive between Republicans and Democrats. I think we'd all be doing a lot better and I know the country would be doing a lot better," said Trump in brief remarks to the crowd. "Tonight, let us enjoy the comfort of our loved ones and tomorrow let us continue to do the people's bidding and create the optimistic future our citizens so richly deserve."

His call for unity, however, was rather incongruent with his tweet just hours before, when he ripped into House and Senate Minority Leaders Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer, even derisively nicknaming the latter "Cryin' Chuck." Trump has also blamed congressional Democrats for his legislative woes, even though Republicans control both houses of Congress.

Accolades

Trump shares photo of Rep. Scalise for 'throwback Thursday'

In a tweet labeled "throwback Thursday," President Trump shared a photo of Rep. Steve Scalise (R-La.) taken May 4 at a Rose Garden reception to celebrate House Republicans' passage of legislation to roll back the Affordable Care Act.

Scalise was shot last week at a Republican congressional baseball practice. He was upgraded to fair condition on Wednesday.

Domestic policyHealthcareObama

Trump says he supports Senate healthcare bill

Senate Republicans unveiled a draft bill on Thursday to roll back the Affordable Care Act, including a drastic reduction in federal healthcare spending that threatens to leave millions more Americans uninsured, drive up costs for poor consumers and further destabilize the nation’s health insurance markets.

Trump said Wednesday night at a campaign-style rally in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, that he had told senators to “add some money to it” to produce a healthcare bill with “heart.”

Asked Thursday morning whether the Senate draft met that standard, the president suggested some changes were needed.

"A little negotiation, but it's going to be very good," he told reporters.

Later Thursday, Trump tweeted that he was "very supportive" of the legislation, and that he looked forward to "making it really special."

The legislative outline, which Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s team wrote largely behind closed doors, hews closely to the Obamacare repeal bill passed last month by House Republicans, though it includes important differences.

Like the House bill, the Senate plan would eliminate hundreds of billions of dollars in taxes over the next decade, with large benefits for the wealthiest Americans. And like the House bill, it would pay for those cuts by dramatically reducing federal money for Medicaid, probably forcing states to make deep cuts in their healthcare programs for the poor. Trump promised during his campaign not to reduce Medicaid.

Although the Senate bill preserves premium subsidies that help some low-income buyers purchase insurance, it would scale them back significantly.

It remained unclear whether McConnell has the 50 votes he needs for passage, as almost a dozen GOP senators voiced reservations. Moderates thought the bill was too harsh, while conservatives wanted a faster rollback of Obamacare.

Foreign policyImmigration

Trump says Mexico is the second-deadliest country: 'We will BUILD THE WALL!'

President Trump tweeted that Mexico was "just ranked" the world's second-deadliest country and renewed his call for a wall to be built along the border with the United States.

Trump appeared to refer to a report released May 9 by the London-based International Institute for Strategic Studies, which concluded that criminal violence in Mexico had reached "a level akin to armed conflict."

The report found that, in 2016, Mexico saw 23,000 homicides. Among countries the authors considered to be in armed conflict, only Syria had a higher death toll.

But some observers raised objections to the report's methodology and argued that it incorrectly characterized Mexico as a country in armed conflict.

A statement issued by Mexico's Foreign and Interior ministries in the days after the report's release argued that the existence of organized criminal violence was not sufficient to earn the categorization, and that not all of the homicides there could be attributed to such crime.

The statement pointed out that, according to United Nations statistics from 2014, Mexico's rate of 16.4 homicides per 100,000 residents was significantly lower than those of several other Latin American countries that were not ranked in the report.

As for Trump's promised border wall, its future is unclear. Its construction was one of his most oft-repeated campaign pledges, and he has insisted that Mexico would foot the bill.

But Mexican officials have repeatedly and angrily rejected the demand, and a U.S. government spending bill passed in May allocated no funds for a wall to be built.

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