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1349 posts
  • His cabinet
  • Insults
  • Politics and polls
  • Fox News

President Trump accused Senate Democrats of slow-walking his nominees, but his blame is misplaced. It's the president who is lagging behind his predecessors in naming candidates for key government posts during his first five months in the office.

Trump has so far nominated 110 people for 559 positions, fewer nominations than each of the last four presidents, according to the nonpartisan Partnership for Public Service. By comparison, President Obama had selected 252 nominees by early June 2009.

Thirty-six percent of Trump's nominees have been confirmed, compared with 59% of Obama's, the group's data show, suggesting that Trump indeed has had fewer nominees confirmed.

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  • Immigration
  • Courts
  • Travel ban

President Trump’s lawyers found themselves undercut by their client Monday when the chief executive tweeted that he wanted a “much tougher version” of a “travel ban,” and “not the watered down, politically correct version they submitted” to the Supreme Court last week.

In four tweets posted between 5:25 a.m. and 5:44 a.m., the president slammed his Justice Department for abandoning the “original Travel Ban,” which was blocked by judges in February after it caused chaos at airports across the nation.

Omar Jadwat, an attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union, said Trump had “undercut the picture the government has been trying to paint.”

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  • Foreign policy
  • On the media
  • Insults
  • Terrorism

President Trump continued for a second day to attack London's mayor, Sadiq Khan, as that city dealt with a weekend terrorist attack, prompting Britain's prime minister among others to come to Khan's defense.

On Monday morning Trump took to his preferred medium, Twitter, just as he had the day before, to criticize Khan for telling Londoners — in Trump's words — that they had "no reason to be alarmed." But Trump took Khan's remarks out of context, suggesting the mayor — a Muslim — was being dismissive of terrorism when in fact Khan was reassuring his constituents about the expanded police presence in London.

Khan declined to engage Trump, yet the president wrote this on Monday, hitting the "MSM" — mainstream media — as well:  

  • Daily summary
President Trump at Ford's Theatre on Sunday.
President Trump at Ford's Theatre on Sunday. (Olivier Douliery / European Pressphoto Agency)

President Trump tweeted about:

  1. What he perceived as the need for society to "stop being politically correct" and "get smart" in the wake of a terrorist attack in London
  2. Derision toward London's mayor for attempting to reassure the public after the attack
  3. His disdain for the U.S. gun debate upon observing that the London attackers used other types of weapons
  • Foreign policy
  • Terrorism

President Trump struck a discordant note Sunday in a series of tweets responding to the terrorist attack in central London that killed seven people and injured scores more.

Most world leaders had confined their messages to solemn expressions of sympathy and support for the victims, the British people and the government of Prime Minister Theresa May.

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  • Daily summary
Supporters of President Trump attend a "Pittsburgh Not Paris" rally in Washington on Saturday, June 3, in support of his decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate accord.
Supporters of President Trump attend a "Pittsburgh Not Paris" rally in Washington on Saturday, June 3, in support of his decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate accord. (Saul Loeb / AFP/Getty Images)

President Trump tweeted about:

  1. His weekly address
  2. A suspected terror attack in London
  3. The need for his travel ban
  • Immigration
  • Foreign policy
  • On the media
  • Domestic policy
  • Courts
  • Travel ban
  • Terrorism

Chaos erupted in London late Saturday when a vehicle rammed into pedestrians on London Bridge, injuring an undetermined number of people and causing hundreds of others to flee in panic.

There were also reports of stabbings and shots fired in Borough Market — not far from the bridge.

As the events unfolded, President Trump took to Twitter to argue in favor of his temporary ban on foreigners arriving from six majority-Muslim nations, which judges halted hours before it was set to take effect in mid-March.

  • His schedule

President Trump tweeted a video of his weekly address, in which he recapped his inaugural trip abroad.

In his remarks, Trump recounted the highlights of his stops in Saudi Arabia, Jerusalem, Bethlehem and Vatican City, as well as his participation in a NATO summit in Brussels and a Group of 7 meeting in Sicily.

"Everywhere we went, my goal was to advance American interests, to build a coalition of nations to drive out the terrorists and to unlock a future of peace, prosperity and hope for all Americans – and people – around the world," he said.

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  • Daily summary
President Trump, flanked by members of law enforcement, sits down to sign bills in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House on Friday, June 2, 2017.
President Trump, flanked by members of law enforcement, sits down to sign bills in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House on Friday, June 2, 2017. (Alex Brandon / Associated Press)

President Trump tweeted about:

  1. His decision to withdraw from the Paris climate accord
  • Foreign policy
  • Accolades
  • Domestic policy
  • The economy
  • Fox News

President Trump has shared a Twitter moment consisting of statements praising his decision to withdraw from the Paris climate change accord.

Trump's lengthy — and disputed — economic and foreign policy explanations on Thursday for ceding U.S. leadership on the issue were cast in terms that aimed to please his 2016 voters, who were older, whiter and more rural than the nation as a whole. Their shared America leans toward defiant and aggrieved, yearning for the way things used to be, and seeing a future threatened by opponents domestic and foreign.

The president’s climate change decision was greeted with applause in his strongholds in places such as western Pennsylvania and West Virginia, whose economies have long been dependent on fossil fuels, primarily coal, that would be restricted by the Paris agreement’s terms for reducing emissions.