Politics

His tweets have the power to shape international relations, send stock prices up — or down — and galvanize the American public.

We're watching how Donald Trump is using this platform of unfettered communication now that he’s commander in chief. Here is everything Trump has tweeted since he was sworn in as 45th president of the United States. In many cases, we look at what he was reacting to and whether what he said was accurate. And, as much as possible, we'll relate what else was going on at the time. Check back for more as Trump continues to tweet.

InsultsOn the media

Did Trump just confirm the existence of a covert CIA program in a tweet?

President Trump took aim at the Washington Post in a series of tweets Monday night.

The president appeared to take issue with a Post article published last week that reported that Trump had decided to end a secret CIA program to arm and train Syrian rebels to fight the government of President Bashar Assad. The report stated that Russia had long wanted to see the program phased out, and that Trump's decision to do so reflected his desire to work more closely with Moscow.

But in responding to the Post article, which he claimed "fabricated the facts" on his decision to end the initiative, Trump appeared to confirm the covert program's existence.

The president went on to revive his complaint about "fake news," which he's leveled many times against news reports with which he disagrees.

Trump has in the past referred to the Post as the "Amazon Washington Post" and suggested that the newspaper helps the online shopping giant put political pressure on lawmakers to avoid paying taxes.

Amazon Chief Executive Jeff Bezos bought the Washington Post in 2013, but he made the purchase as an individual and Amazon.com Inc. was not involved.

As a candidate, Trump accused Bezos of employing the Post as a tool to influence corporate tax policy. In a May 2016 interview with Fox News' Sean Hannity, Trump also suggested that Bezos was directing Post reporters to investigate Trump because he was afraid that, if elected, Trump would "go after" Amazon for antitrust violations.

U.S. antitrust regulators are reportedly scrutinizing Amazon's recently proposed agreement to buy Whole Foods for $13.7 billion, but many still expect the deal to move forward.

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