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1349 posts
  • On the media
  • Insults

President Trump took aim at the Washington Post in a series of tweets Monday night.

The president appeared to take issue with a Post article published last week that reported that Trump had decided to end a secret CIA program to arm and train Syrian rebels to fight the government of President Bashar Assad. The report stated that Russia had long wanted to see the program phased out, and that Trump's decision to do so reflected his desire to work more closely with Moscow.

But in responding to the Post article, which he claimed "fabricated the facts" on his decision to end the initiative, Trump appeared to confirm the covert program's existence.

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  • His schedule

President Trump took jabs at Republican senators, "dishonest" reporters, his predecessor and his 2016 election rival in a rambling and surprisingly partisan speech before about 30,000 Boy Scouts and their troop leaders Monday evening in West Virginia. 

In one aside during remarks to the National Scout Jamboree in Glen Jean, W.V., the president asked, "Who the hell wants to speak about politics when I'm in front of the Boy Scouts?" Yet he launched into an extended a critique of Washington politics.

That included jibes at senators in his own party -- including by name the home state senator, Shelley Moore Capito -- who have balked at ending the Affordable Care Act and replacing it with a still uncertain plan that would cut hundreds of billions of dollars from Medicaid.

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  • His schedule

President Trump tweeted a video clip of his arrival at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland, where he stopped Monday afternoon en route to West Virginia to attend a national gathering of Boy Scouts.

Trump was slated to speak at the National Scout Jamboree, a gathering of more than 40,000 Scouts, leaders and volunteers. 

He is the eighth president to attend the event, which is typically held every four years. Each U.S. president serves as honorary president of the Boy Scouts of America.

  • Healthcare
  • Domestic policy
  • Politics and polls

With a strong, last-minute push from President Trump, Senate Republicans face a pivotal vote Tuesday in their long bid to repeal or replace the Affordable Care Act.

But the outcome remained in doubt, largely because senators have not even been told which of the various GOP plans will be considered.

Trump warned senators Monday that Tuesday’s planned “motion to proceed” — the first legislative hurdle to passing a Senate bill — could be Republicans’ “last chance” to undo the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

  • On the media
  • Insults
  • Russia
  • Politics and polls

President Trump continued to vent his frustration at ongoing investigations into Russian interference in the 2016 election, tweeting a familiar suggestion that Democrats have rallied behind election meddling allegations in order to de-legitimize Trump's surprise win and explain away the loss of their nominee, Hillary Clinton.

Trump's Monday morning tweet appeared to reference comments from Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) published in a Washington Post report on Democrats' attempt to recover from their election loss by launching a new progressive-leaning economic agenda.

Schumer did not suggest in the Post interview that he doubted the assessment of the FBI and multiple U.S. intelligence agencies, which agree that Russia meddled in the election with the aim of manipulating the results in Trump's favor.

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  • His cabinet
  • Russia
  • Politics and polls
  • The Clintons

President Trump took a new swipe at Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions on Monday, referring to him in a tweet as "beleaguered" and wondering why Sessions isn't digging into Hillary Clinton's alleged contacts with Russia.

Fuming about the ongoing investigations into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and questions as to whether his campaign colluded with foreign officials, Trump again focused his ire on Sessions, who was once one of the president's closest allies.

Trump's tweet came just hours before his son-in-law and senior advisor, Jared Kushner, traveled to Capitol Hill to be interviewed about his meetings with Russians.

  • Insults
  • Russia
  • Politics and polls

President Trump on Monday morning criticized the Democratic leader of the House investigation into Russian attempts to interfere with the 2016 election, calling Burbank Rep. Adam Schiff "sleazy" and "biased."

Schiff is the highest ranking Democrat on the House Select Intelligence Committee, which is examining whether the Trump campaign assisted in Russia's efforts. The committee is meeting behind closed doors Tuesday to hear from Trump's son-in-law, Jared Kushner.

The investigation has catapulted Schiff into the national spotlight. Schiff has become a frequent guest on cable and Sunday morning news shows, and has turned to Twitter, the president's preferred medium, to respond directly to Trump.

  • Daily summary
President Trump boards Air Force One on Saturday.
President Trump boards Air Force One on Saturday. (Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press)

President Trump tweeted about:

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  • Healthcare
  • On the media
  • Insults
  • Accolades
  • Politics and polls
  • Fox News

President Trump sought to turn up the pressure on Republican lawmakers Sunday, tweeting that if they fail to pass legislation to roll back his predecessor's healthcare law, "the repercussions will be far greater than any of them understand!"

It wasn't immediately clear whether Trump was referring to political repercussions for lawmakers or those that would be felt by Americans seeking health coverage absent the passage of legislation to overhaul the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare.

The president has said in the past that Republicans should let Obamacare "fail" if they can't reach an agreement to repeal it. He raised the suggestion last week when the latest GOP-backed effort to advance healthcare legislation collapsed in the Senate.

  • Russia
  • Politics and polls

A day after unleashing a barrage of angry tweets venting his frustration at the widening investigation into suspected Russian election interference and possible collusion with members of his campaign team, President Trump turned his ire against members of his own political party.

In tweets Sunday, Trump accused Republicans of "doing little to protect their President" while again brushing aside the probe as a "phony Russian Witch Hunt."

In the past, Trump has suggested that Democrats concocted the allegation that Russia meddled in the 2016 presidential election as an excuse for losing the race.