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California

Here’s when stay-at-home orders are expiring in each of California’s 58 counties

While all Californians are currently living under a statewide stay-at-home order implemented in response to the coronavirus outbreak, some counties have also crafted additional or more-targeted local regulations aimed at stemming the disease’s spread.

The county-level orders vary, as do their expiration dates. Some of the measures are in place until a specified date, others until further notice.

Generally, local health officials can issue guidance that’s stricter, but not more lenient, than the state’s.

As COVID-19 continues to spread in California, some communities are itching to open things back up and allow residents to resume some semblance of pre-pandemic activity. Some counties have petitioned Gov. Gavin Newsom to relax the statewide restrictions, while others have released road maps for how their local businesses can operate once they’re able to reopen.

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Others, though, warn that lifting too many restrictions too quickly could lead to a spike in infections.

Here’s the latest information for how long stay-at-home orders are in effect for each of California’s 58 counties, as of April 30:

Alameda County: A revised order was released this week and is in effect through May.

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Alpine County: Unspecified. “No one likes living under lockdown, and that is not sustainable,” officials wrote in an April 23 update. “We need to move toward a gradual easing of the ‘do nots’ with great caution. That means physical distancing, face coverings when unable to maintain adequate space and compulsive hand hygiene.”

Amador County: In effect through April 30. If that order lapses, Amador County would still remain under the state order, officials said this week.

Butte County: The county is following the state’s stay-at-home order, which does not have a set end date. While the county “does not currently have authority to modify or lift the state order to be less restrictive in regards to staying home, social distancing and essential operations,” officials there have begun crafting a reopening plan for when the time comes, according to a statement Monday.

Calaveras County: Unspecified. The stay-at-home order will remain in place until the state’s “is rescinded, unless it is extended, terminated or modified” by the county health officer before then.

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Colusa County: In effect through May 8.

Contra Costa County: A revised order was released this week and is in effect through May.

Nurseries and other outdoor businesses can reopen Monday in six Bay Area counties after closing due to the coronavirus. Skate parks can, too.

Del Norte County: The county is following the state’s stay-at-home order, which does not have a set end date. “The rules set in place by the governor remain in place until the governor takes them away,” County Public Health Officer Dr. Warren Rehwaldt wrote in a letter Monday. “We don‘t have authority to remove them at a local level — we are legally bound to enforce them.”

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El Dorado County: In effect through April 30, and County Public Health Officer Dr. Nancy Williams has said she will let it expire then. “Going forward, residents will be guided primarily by the governor’s order,” she said in a statement Tuesday. “I will remain vigilant and am prepared to reinstate county-level restrictions if necessary to protect our health care systems and our residents.”

Fresno County: The county Department of Public Health’s website references the state order, which does not have a set end date. The city of Fresno has its own order, which is in effect through May 6.

Glenn County: The county is following the state order, which does not have a set end date.

More pressure is likely to be placed on Gov. Gavin Newsom to offer a clearer timeline to reopening California amid the coronavirus outbreak.
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Humboldt County: Effective until rescinded.

Imperial County: Effective until rescinded.

Inyo County: Effective until rescinded. “Residents are advised that an Inyo County COVID-19 Reopening Team is in place and developing a plan with objectives of reviewing regional statistics, analyzing local resources and assets and keeping a pulse-check on our ability to effectively and safely handle a potential surge in COVID-19 cases,” officials said on April 23.

Kern County: In effect until further notice.

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Kings County: The county rescinded its shelter-in-place directive Tuesday, but “restrictions mandated by the state will continue until the state ends its stay-at-home order,” officials said.

Lake County: In effect until May 3, though a recent addendum won’t expire until June 1.

Lassen County: The county is subject to the state order, which does not have a set end date. Officials on Tuesday unveiled a proposed “recovery plan to reopen Lassen County as soon as statewide orders have been modified or lifted,” which they say “will be executed gradually and within multiple phases.”

Los Angeles County: The county’s “Safer at Home” order will be in place through at least May 15.

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Madera County: The county is following the state order, which does not have a set end date.

Marin County: A revised order was released this week and is in effect through May.

Mariposa County: The county is following the state order, which does not have a set end date.

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Mendocino County: A recently revised order is in effect until May 10.

Merced County: In effect until it is rescinded, superseded or amended.

Modoc County: The county’s COVID-19 website links to the state order, which does not have a set end date. However, officials there have unveiled a strategic plan that would allow all businesses — even those deemed nonessential — to reopen starting May 1, provided they follow specified guidelines. “We want the option to be given to business owners so that, when they feel the time is right, they can make that decision,” the county Sheriff’s Office wrote on Facebook on Tuesday. “Business owners know their staff, they know their customers and they will know when they both feel safe enough to resume services. We need to do this in a smart and strategic way to keep us all healthy.”

Mono County: The county is following the state order, which does not have a set end date.

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Monterey County: In effect through May 3.

Napa County: In effect until otherwise amended or rescinded.

Nevada County: In effect until May 15.

Orange County: The county is following the state order, which does not have a set end date.

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Most L.A. County beaches, as well as trails and recreation areas, remain closed, so O.C.'s shores might end up being a big draw this weekend.

Placer County: In effect through May 1. After that, residents will be guided by the governor’s order. “This transition will allow a local focus on planning for a phased reopening in partnership with local governments, healthcare, business and other stakeholders, as well as regional and state partners,” the county said in a statement Wednesday.

Plumas County: The county is following the state order, which does not have a set end date. Officials there released a plan Sunday “to make sure we can reopen as soon as it is safe and legal to do so” — adding in a statement that though they are “eager for the governor’s order to be relaxed” so that residents can get back to work, “to let our guard down now would be a big mistake.”

Riverside County: In effect through June 19 after an extension Wednesday. Residents must wear face coverings when outside and continue practicing social distancing until that date.

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Sacramento County: The order was recently extended through May 22. “While there has been some relaxation of rules as they relate to recreational activities, it is absolutely vital that we maintain social distancing,” Director of Health Services Dr. Peter Beilenson said in a statement Wednesday.

San Benito County: In effect until May 3.

San Bernardino County: In effect until rescinded.

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San Diego County: Has been extended indefinitely, officials announced Wednesday.

San Francisco: A revised order was released this week and is in effect through May.

San Joaquin County: In effect until rescinded.

San Luis Obispo County: In effect until May 16.

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Some smaller California communities want to begin easing stay-at-home restrictions, saying they have made enough progress against the coronavirus.

San Mateo County: A revised order was released this week and is in effect through May.

Santa Barbara County: The county’s “Stay Well at Home” order is in place until May 31.

Santa Clara County: A revised order was released this week and is in effect through May.

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Santa Cruz County: In effect until May 3.

Shasta County: The county is following the state order, which does not have a set end date.

Sierra County: The county is following the state order, which does not have a set end date.

The latest maps and charts on the spread of COVID-19 in California.
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Siskiyou County: The county is following the state order, which does not have a set end date.

Solano County: In effect through May 17.

Sonoma County: In effect through May 3.

Stanislaus County: In place until rescinded.

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Sutter County: In effect through May 3.

Tehama County: The county is following the state order, which does not have a set end date.

Trinity County: The county is following the state order, which does not have a set end date.

Tulare County: The county is following the state order, which does not have a set end date.

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Tuolumne County: The county is following the state order, which does not have a set end date.

Ventura County: The county’s “stay well at home” order was recently revised and is in effect through May 15.

Ventura County modified its coronavirus stay-at-home order to permit some businesses to reopen and some gatherings to take place.

Yolo County: In place until May 1.

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Yuba County: In effect through May 3.


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