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Sharon Osbourne says she’d take Ozzy back on one condition

Sharon Osbourne says she’d take Ozzy back on one condition
"I can't keep living like this." (CBS)

In May, amid tabloid reports that her rocker husband and business partner, Ozzy Osbourne, was involved with another woman, Sharon Osbourne, 63, told a riveted TV audience that she had kicked Ozzy out of their house. "I can't keep living like this," she said on the set of the CBS show she co-hosts, "The Talk." Since then, while living apart from her husband, she is re-imagining her future: how she wants to spend the rest of her life, what will bring her joy, and what a healthy relationship looks like.

Professionally, she has become a judge on "The X Factor (U.K.)" alongside Simon Cowell and begun writing a book to add to her four bestsellers. The mother of three, grandmother of two and colon cancer survivor is hounded by paparazzi wherever she goes but said she remains strong and filled with gratitude.  "And I'm lucky that I can support myself – I really don't need anything from a man other than love."

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How are you handling the personal turmoil?

I'm seeing a therapist on a regular basis. When my husband [currently on tour] is here we see a couple's therapist together. My husband is doing therapy alone. So we are all talking to people. And I'm seeing what it's like living on my own. ... It's very hard because we're 34 years married, 36 years living as a couple, and I've known him for 40 years. Of course, you miss that person. ... He and I talk daily on business. I've started doing things with my friends that I wouldn't normally do if my husband was here. … There were times when I wouldn't go to events because Ozzy was working or didn't want to go. Now I am doing things I want to do.

You split up before. What brought you back together in the past?

I left him three years ago when he went back to drinking and using drugs again. We were [separated] for about eight weeks. We got back together then because he was really trying to deal with his demons and openly saying to the family and the world, "I [really messed] up again. I fell off the wagon again." He was ashamed of his actions and what he did. He's been with a sober coach ever since.

They used to tell couples to stay together for the sake of the kids. What do you think about that advice?

You don't want to be a woman who shows your girls you stay together no matter what – he can beat you, be a drunk, be a womanizer, but you stay with him. No. ... That's not healthy. That's not good. … I discuss it all with my kids because they're adults. They all have their own opinions and each sees it differently.

Any advice for other women trying to create a healthy relationship?

Your life and happiness don't depend on your husband. Do whatever you can to keep yourself busy. Socialize. Join something that gets you out of the house and out of your head.

I understand you are a fan of meditation.

Yes, and I'm enjoying it. I started because of Howard Stern. I went to Deepak Chopra's center to learn how. I try to meditate 20 minutes twice a day. Funnily enough, my husband has started to meditate. It's something he is doing for himself. I have seen a great improvement in him through meditation.

Are you still in love with him and will you get back together?

That's a very good question. Obviously you love that person because they're in your life for so long. You've got a family together. We created a successful business together. I don't want to hurt him. I admire and respect him. And that's what I expect back: respect. … I didn't get that. It's very hurtful when you don't get that respect and consideration from your partner… Can I ever trust him again? I don't know. I'm now questioning every statement, every move. … The lies and intrigue still hurt...

Ideally, I would love for my husband to deal with his issues and work at the problems that he has now.  And be honest and open … to be able to come back to us with honesty and respect for the family. That's what I really wish.

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health@latimes.com

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