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Readers React: Issuing marriage licenses isn’t God’s work

Rowan County Clerk of Courts Kim Davis is flanked her attorney Mat Staver, right, and Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee in front of the Carter County Detention Center on Sept. 8 in Grayson, Ky.

Rowan County Clerk of Courts Kim Davis is flanked her attorney Mat Staver, right, and Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee in front of the Carter County Detention Center on Sept. 8 in Grayson, Ky.

(Ty Wright / Getty Images)

To the editor: Rowan County, Ky., is a lovely rural area nestled in the Appalachian foothills, crowned by a quiet but thriving county seat encircling Morehead State University. I know; I used to live there. How sad that one of its public officials refuses to serve the people in the way she swore she would. (“Freed clerk Kim Davis tells supporters to keep fighting same-sex marriage,” Sept. 8)

If Kim Davis, the county clerk, feels she can no longer fulfill the duties of her office as defined by the current laws of our nation (local, state and national), including issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples, she could prove her faith by simply resigning and joining the other protesters. But resigning would cost her the $80,000-a-year salary paid by a job she inherited from her mother. Even her few days in jail for contempt of court involved nothing really arduous and a chance to read her Bible.

While she was reading, I hope she spent some time studying Romans Chapter 13 to learn what Jesus really says about obeying civil laws and authorities.

Bonnie Compton Hanson, Santa Ana

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To the editor: I would like for Davis’ supporters to explain how she is any different in practicing her religion than Islamic extremists. It looks to me like all of them believe they have divine blessing to force their interpretation of God’s teachings on everyone else.

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As a public official, Davis is obligated to uphold the law regardless of her personal beliefs. If she finds her beliefs are in conflict with her sworn duties, then the honorable thing to do is resign.

We do not have a state religion. The Founding Fathers established in this nation’s Constitution the separation of church and state.

I recall reading that principle somewhere in a much older text. That’s right — there is a quote from someone called Jesus, who said, “Render to

Caesar the things that are Caesar’s and to God the things that are God’s.”

Paul D. Wilson, Camarillo

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To the editor: A county clerk in Kentucky refuses to issue marriage licenses to gay couples, and recently news was made by a flight attendant who refused to serve alcohol to passengers. Both employees cite their religious beliefs as their reason.

The duties both these employees are refusing to perform are part of their job descriptions, and their employers have every right to expect them to do the jobs they were hired for. If the employees cannot or will not do their jobs, they should be fired, plain and simple.

No one is forcing these people to apply for jobs that may go against their personal or religious beliefs.

Judy Winick, Los Angeles

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