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Opinion

Opinion: Trump should read about the Muslim foster father who cares for terminally ill kids

“I know she can’t hear, can’t see, but I always talk to her,” Mohamed Bzeek says.
“I know she can’t hear, can’t see, but I always talk to her,” Mohamed Bzeek says.
(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

To the editor: Thank you so much for the moving article about foster father Mohamed Bzeek and his tireless, compassionate care for the babies and children suffering from terminal diseases and disabilities. I am humbled. (“‘I know they are going to die.’ This foster father takes in only terminally ill children,” Feb. 8)

How I wish our current self-proclaimed Christian president, cabinet members and Republican-dominated Congress would read his story and rethink their current actions to take away healthcare from millions; meditate on their zeal to rip away environmental, food and animal welfare protections; cogitate upon their haste to shut out the suffering; and regret their decisions to put the greediest denizens of Wall Street in charge of our nation’s financial security. 

This is Christianity in name only. Meanwhile, a Muslim man from Libya gives everything he has for the neediest beings of all. Mr. Bzeek, you are the definition of courage and compassion.

Cathy Goldberg, Seal Beach

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What courage, what sacrifice, what devotion this lovely man exhibits as he cares for those who would otherwise suffer and die alone.
Lisa Schmitt, Bell Canyon

To the editor: Growing up in a family that also provided emergency foster care to children, I have experienced the power of loving these kids as your own. Reading about the binders of medical information Bzeek carries to doctor appointments brought back memories. 

Sleepless nights with sick kids, surprise arrivals and emotional departures were part of the journey. Keeping in touch over the years with many of the children I knew showed me how important that unconditional love was to their young lives.

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Bzeek reminds us of how love becomes even more meaningful when it is given freely. Even though his young charges may never know the gift of time or perspective, I have no doubt they feel his love. 

The world needs more Mohamed Bzeeks.

Jim Garfield, Santa Monica

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To the editor: I am not religious. But I was introduced to an angel in your article as I cried my way through it. Bzeek is perhaps the most selfless, loving human being I have ever encountered. It is not surprising his young son is as loving as his father. 

Bzeek deserves all our esteem and heartfelt thanks for taking care of the little girl referenced in the article and all the children he has fostered. What courage, what sacrifice, what devotion this lovely man exhibits as he cares for those who would otherwise suffer and die alone. 

This story will stay with me for the rest of my life.

Lisa Schmitt, Bell Canyon

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To the editor: There were tears in my eyes as I read the article about Bzeek, a very bright spot among all of the unpleasant business of today’s world. This lovely man devoting his life to caring for these helpless children is an example to all of us. 

Then I realized that as a Muslim from Libya, he would not be allowed to enter our country now. He would be banned because of his religion and country of origin — a ban ordered by a president who as far as I can tell has never done a kind thing for anyone.

Patricia L. Moore, Los Angeles

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To the editor: Thank you for bringing Bzeek’s dedication to light. He and his deceased wife are the very embodiment of compassion and an inspiration to all who work to reduce the suffering of the most vulnerable.

Debbie Elliott, Pacific Palisades

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