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Letters to the Editor: L.A. is lucky to have Austin Beutner as its schools chief

Austin Beutner and three other people watch as a man directs a spray gun at a school desk.
Supt. Austin Beutner, center, watches a demonstration of school-desk disinfection at Panorama High on March 10.
(Los Angeles Times)

To the editor: I am typically frugal with my praise for school district administration, especially for the superintendent. But I do give credit where credit is due. (“In massive reopening effort at 1,400 L.A. public schools, safety is the priority,” April 5)

From the very beginning of the pandemic, Supt. Austin Beutner has led the way in ensuring the safety and well-being of the communities that the Los Angeles Unified School District serves. He has full understanding of the vital services that LAUSD provides for communities that have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic.

The community school is a lifeline for many in these communities, and for some families it is the only social safety net that is readily available.

The pandemic has brought to light the inequities we face in our country, and over the past year, Beutner has fought to address those inequities. I only wish our elected officials would do the same.

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Jason Y. Calizar, Torrance

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To the editor: Please give the hardworking teachers and principals of L.A. Unified a break. (“LAUSD students suffered ‘alarming’ academic harm during pandemic, report say,” March 31)

The local advocacy group Great Public Schools Now, which produced the report on students falling behind during the pandemic, doesn’t seem to have a clue about the challenges that have been thrust upon our educators in the trenches, nor does it offer any uplifting solutions or positive help for our dedicated teachers.

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Of course there have been inequities in our schools and our society that have been exposed by the anguish of the pandemic, but they are being addressed.

Advocacy groups that cannot come up with uplifting solutions become part of the problem. I believe they are called the “armchair quarterbacks.”

Tom Kaminski, Manhattan Beach


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