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Letters to the Editor: Don’t think for a second that U.S. troops in Afghanistan sacrificed in vain

A man in camouflage stands alongside a U.S. flag.
A Marine watches from the roof of Kandahar International Airport in southern Afghanistan during the raising of an American flag on Dec. 18, 2001.
(Los Angeles Times)

To the editor: Responding to L.A. Times Letters Editor Paul Thornton, who asked for readers to send letters about their memories of the start of the war in Afghanistan, my question to him is this: What did he do after the attack? (“What it felt like when the Afghanistan war started in 2001,” letters, April 17)

Did he stay in school discussing what occurred, or did he sense a call to duty? To do something about the 9/11 attacks and take action?

My son-in-law joined the military and did three tours in Iraq. He felt the call to duty, to do what he could to defend his country.

There will always be conflict and war. While I agree that the men and women serving in Afghanistan deserve to come home, I believe it is naive to think the withdrawal of U.S. forces will not have negative repercussions. I’d hate to think that the sacrifices made were done in vain.

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I believe it’s important to remember that there are real people behind the stories and events, and they deserve to be remembered.

Warren Crawford, Lakewood

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To the editor: As a mother whose son served three tours after the 9/11 attacks, I welcome the news that our troops are coming home from Afghanistan after 20 years.

I hope this is just the beginning of troop withdrawals from everywhere we have participated in unjust wars. I know firsthand the damage that this war caused not just to the loved ones of veterans, but also to those affected by the thousands of innocent lives lost in Afghanistan.

Rossana Cambron, Los Angeles

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To the editor: When I first heard that the war in Afghanistan had begun, I was in my local bar with my friends.

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Everyone was excited about getting revenge. Being the cynic that I am, I asked them, “Can you spell Vietnam?”

John Vitz, Manhattan Beach


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