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Curt Schilling doesn’t seem fazed after being fired by ESPN

Curt Schilling

Former major league pitcher Curt Schilling, shown in 2012, made too many controversial statements for ESPN. He was fired by ESPN in April of 2016. 

(Steven Senne / Associated Press)

Curt Schilling doesn’t seem to think it’s a big deal he got fired from ESPN after he posted a controversial meme on Facebook this week.

“It’s a job, not a member of my family,” Schilling said Friday on SiriusXM’s “Breitbart News Daily.”

“Listen, I’m lucky I’ve been so blessed in my life to be able to experience and do the things I’ve done and if that job meant I had to continue doing it to put a roof over the head of my family and food on my table, I’m probably acting a little differently than I did.”

Schilling was dropped from ESPN’s coverage of the Little League World Series in August and then suspended for the rest of the Major League Baseball season for tweeting a meme that compared Muslims to Nazis.

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Back in March, Schilling appeared to have violated ESPN’s guidelines for election coverage by stating that Hillary Clinton “should be buried under a jail somewhere” during a radio interview. ESPN said it addressed the matter with Schilling and allowed him to be part of its “Monday Night Baseball” broadcasts as planned.

The final straw came this week, when Schilling shared a meme on Facebook that showed a picture of a male character wearing a wig and women’s clothing, with the caption, “Let him in! to the restroom with your daughter or else you’re a narrow minded, judgmental, unloving, racist bigot who needs to die!!!”

Schilling is said to have added the comments, “A man is a man no matter what they call themselves” and “Now you need laws telling us differently? Pathetic.”

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He said Friday: “A lot of people can’t or won’t jeopardize what they do for a living to be and espouse the things they believe. I’m not that guy. I’m not dependent on other people to support my family for the rest of my life.”

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Schilling added: “I’ll always love talking about pitching. I think I know it, I thought I was good at it. But at a company where the rules are different based completely and solely on your perspective and your belief, it didn’t work. They didn’t like that.”

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