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Sports

Letters: Lakers changing their name to the Loan Rangers?

Shutting down the beaches
(Jim Thompson / For The Times)

After learning that the Lakers have returned the $4.6-million loan they received, I don’t know what offends me more: the fact that the government would award such a loan to a company worth billions or that the Lakers had the incredible gall to apply for such a loan in the first place.

I own a small business with eight employees. We too applied for a loan for a fraction of what the Lakers already received. We have received nothing.

Tim O’Connell
Anaheim Hills

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The Los Angeles Lakers just became the Los Angeles Takers in my book. Would you have given back the $4.6 million absent the public shaming brought on by social media? You have shamed Elgin, Jerry, Kareem, James, and Kobe and every player who has worn the purple and gold, as well as an entire city.

William Ford
Big Bear City

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Guess I missed the news of Shake Shack and Ruth’s Chris Steak House becoming official sponsors of the Lakers.

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Mer Valdez
Long Beach

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Chick Hearn would have said it best,

“It looks like the Lakers have gotten their hand caught in the cookie jar!”

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Ron Finnerman
Simi Valley

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I wanted to commend Bill Plaschke for his article “Fanfare for an uncommon man” on Los Angeles sports fan Paul Martinez, who recently passed away. I became emotional reading the piece because even though I never met the man personally, sports is a great unifier in the world and being a native Angeleno it made me think of friends and family that are passionate about their teams.

At the end of the day athletes, movie stars, and musicians must realize fans make the experience come alive. Blessings to his family.

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Justin Klippel
Westchester

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Bill Plaschke’s column triggered an idea. Peter Ueberroth used a raffle system for Olympic tickets so the general public could have affordability. How about the Lakers set aside of a block of affordable tickets called the Paul Martinez Raffle so that these fans can actually go to a game? Dodgers, Rams, Chargers too?

Harry Hufford
Santa Rosa, Calif.

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In recent years we have had to wait in long lines at all venues as we all walked through metal detectors and had our bags checked. There were always a few that moaned and groaned, but most of us waited patiently. One can only imagine how long those lines are going to be when we add a temperature check to the process. I can’t wait to be in that line.

Steve Finch
Redondo Beach

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If we open the stadiums for sporting events soon maybe we can also open some wagering windows outside the arenas. This would generate some extra revenue for our local economy. Fans could get really good odds on the bet that states, “I am sitting next to someone that has not been tested for the virus and may be spreading it.”

That’s too much of a gamble right now.

Edward Jacobs
Santa Monica

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Nancy LaBianca, in her April 25 letter, laments “the insanity of paying millions to athletes.” Yes, we all know that the real heroes are nurses, teachers, sanitation workers, etc., but wouldn’t it be more insane to allow team owners, who are mostly billionaires, to keep their money without compensating their athletes for the dollars they bring in?

Andrew M. Weiss
Playa del Rey

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While in quarantine, letter writers to the L.A Times must be losing their minds. To suggest Clayton Kershaw is selfish for not wanting to spend four to five months sequestered away from his family in Arizona just so we can watch baseball is ridiculous, given that is never part of the “sacrifice” athletes ever should have to make for playing professionally.

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And declaring owners are out of touch for paying their players millions of dollars, even though the players are the ones helping to generate the billions professional sports leagues make each year, instead of giving it to the healthcare heroes who are fighting COVID-19 is so misguided. Nurses, EMTs, teachers, grocery store workers, they deserve all the credit in the world, but that’s taking redistribution of wealth to fantasy land.

How about some realistic ideas for how we are going to move forward as a society when this is all over, whenever that is?

Danny Balber Jr.
Pasadena

Draft daze


Dylan Hernandez wrote: “All these years, the stars were the adults in war paint wearing officially licensed jerseys,” and, “ the proceedings were short on emotion compared with previous years.” He then declared the NFL draft broadcast “a watered-down event.”

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I watch the draft every year, and the 2020 version was easily the most interesting one since they’ve been televised. We got the chance to see players being themselves in their homes with loved ones, instead of donning garish suits for vapid red carpet photo ops and hugs with the commissioner. We got more insight into the way front offices work than ever before, along with a more intimate view of coaches and executives. We got as many highlights and as much football analysis as ever. We got real, raw emotion with nearly every selection.

But you’re right: We didn’t get to see a bunch of costumed fans cavorting and screaming at a (false) “block party.”

Why does anyone consider sensational displays of shouting fans and a superficial, theme-park vibe more interesting than the competition to build the best NFL teams?

Scott Small
Hermosa Beach

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$100 million raised for COVID-19 relief; $250 million for Jerry Jones’ yacht. What a country.

David Weber
Avondale, Ariz.

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So the Chargers draft at quarterback and linebacker, areas of need. The Rams ignore the areas of need and draft a running back and receiver. Am I missing something here?

Brian Haueter
Ventura

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If the NFL decides to move forward with this season, will teams be mandated to run the spread offense?

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Nick Rose
Newport Coast

No way to go pro


I have absolutely no problem with Daishen Nix wishing to take his talents to the NBA G League. However, to do this after committing to UCLA is gutless, and the governing rules should change.

My solution? From the get-go, you make your decision: pro or college, period. And, a minimum two-year commitment to the university. None of this one-and-done nonsense where a player holds the coach and team hostage while they “think” about what they’re going to do.

Fair is fair. Some form of equity and balance should be enforced.

Rick Solomon
Lake Balboa

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Just perfect


This is turning out to be the best baseball season ever! SportsNet LA is available to a broader audience. They broadcast several games a day. The games last just one hour, and so far the Dodgers are undefeated!

Pat Devine
Redondo Beach

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The Los Angeles Times welcomes expressions of all views. Letters should be brief and become the property of The Times. They may be edited and republished in any format. Each must include a valid mailing address and telephone number. Pseudonyms will not be used.

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Email: sports@latimes.com


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