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1349 posts
  • Immigration
  • Foreign policy
  • On the media
  • Terrorism

At a Saturday campaign-style rally in Florida just four weeks into his presidency, President Trump made an odd statement in reference to countries that accepted Syrian refugees.

"We've got to keep our country safe," Trump told the crowd. "You look at what's happening in Germany. You look at what's happening last night in Sweden. Sweden! Who would believe this?"

There wasn't much happening in Sweden, though. The statement recalled advisor Kellyanne Conway's reference to a nonexistent "Bowling Green massacre." And on Twitter, Ikea jokes ensued.

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  • Healthcare
  • Foreign policy
  • On the media
  • His schedule
  • Accolades
  • The economy

President Trump's joint news conference with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was notable for Trump's move away from longstanding U.S. policy: support for a two-state solution for Israelis and Palestinians.

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  • On the media
  • His schedule
  • Insults
  • Obama

At the campaign-style rally in Florida, Trump continues his attack on the media, declaring before thousands of cheering supporters that “fake news” is undermining his nascent administration’s accomplishments.

Though the administration has faced setbacks, including the resignation of Trump’s national security advisor amid a deepening controversy over Russian interference in U.S. government, approval ratings that are historically low for a new president and the courts’ stalling of the temporary ban on travel to the U.S. from seven majority-Muslim nations, Trump paints a far different picture.

He says the White House is running “so smoothly” and that “a great spirit of optimism” is sweeping the country, citing recent stock market highs as his chief evidence.

During the visit to a Boeing plant in North Charleston, Trump praised the contributions of American workers and pledges to lead a resurgence of manufacturing across the country.

Trump described the rally, which was to be paid for by his campaign committee, much the same way he approached his campaign events, as sold-out affairs that prove his popularity.

The return to theatrics seemed destined not only to thrill his fans, but also to offer political benefit.

At the news conference, Trump countered that all of his early setbacks were the fault of others, the product of “fake news” reporting or both. He called the news media, in general, “fake” about 20 times during the course of the 90-minute presser.

He also repeatedly denounced the leakers in the government who have fueled news stories about the departure of national security advisor Michael Flynn and possible contacts between members of Trump’s campaign team and Russia. But he maintained that the stories themselves were “fake news.”

“The leaks are absolutely real. The news is fake,” Trump said at one point.

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  • Insults
  • Politics and polls
  • The Clintons

President Trump claims that the race for Democratic National Committee chairman was “rigged” -- drawing a quick riposte from Tom Perez, who narrowly won the party's leadership race.

Trump insinuated that Perez’s DNC victory on the second ballot at a party conference in Atlanta on Saturday was because Hillary Clinton had backed Perez, a former Labor secretary in the Obama administration who was seen as representing the party's establishment forces.

Clinton did not make a formal endorsement, but Perez’s rival, Rep. Keith Ellison of Minnesota, was backed by Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and the party's more liberal wing.

  • His cabinet

This comes a day after Navy Vice Adm. Robert Harward turned down an offer to be Trump's national security advisor, reportedly citing financial and family commitments.

He would have replaced retired Gen. Michael Flynn, who resigned at Trump's request after it came to light that he misled Vice President Mike Pence about discussions he held with a Russian diplomat.

Retired Gen. Keith Kellogg, who served as an advisor for Trump’s campaign, is currently acting national security advisor.

  • Healthcare
  • His cabinet
  • Domestic policy
  • Politics and polls

The week before, Price was confirmed as Health and Human Services secretary, overcoming bitter opposition from Democrats who had criticized the Georgia congressman’s calls to repeal the Affordable Care Act and scale back Medicare, Medicaid and other government safety net programs.

He’s expected to assume a leading role in helping guide the Republican effort to roll back the healthcare law, often called Obamacare, and to develop an alternative.

Its repeal has been repeatedly delayed because GOP lawmakers, despite years of pledging to replace the law, have been scrambling to settle on a strategy and overcome divisions within the party.

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  • On the media
  • Domestic policy
  • Obama

The measure to which Trump refers rolls back coal mining regulations that would have updated 30-year-old rules on downstream pollution. Democrats and advocacy groups warn that it will wipe out important environmental safeguards. 

It’s part of a steady stream of bills churned out by the House and Senate that aim to dismantle the regulatory agenda put into place by President Obama.

  • On the media
  • Insults
  • Russia
  • Politics and polls

The day before, Trump decried a New York Times report revealing that his aides had contacts with Russian intelligence officials before the election and then held a news conference during which he blamed leaks and the media’s handling of them for the resignation of national security advisor Michael Flynn.

His comment comes as many conservative media outlets have begun to focus less on the substance of what is being leaked and more on who is doing the leaking.

Hours later, Trump continues in the same vein at his first solo news conference since becoming president. He repeatedly denounces the leakers in the government who have fueled the stories about Flynn and Russia, but he maintains that the stories themselves are “fake news.”