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Letters to the Editor: How did Nicole Linton get a California nursing license?

Candles, balloons and flowers are left at the site of a crash in Windsor Hills that killed six people.
(Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)
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To the editor: As a registered nurse, Nicole Linton would have been aware of the possible outcome when she decided, according to prosecutors, to stop taking her medication for bipolar disorder in 2019. She should have known that she would be subject to mood swings that could turn violent.

I applaud Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Victoria Wilson’s decision to refuse Linton bail and the option of being treated at UCLA before her trial on six counts of murder in a Windsor Hills crash last month.

However, I am perplexed that it appears that Linton’s co-workers didn’t seem to recognize her deteriorating mental health. I’m also concerned that the state Board of Registered Nursing granted Linton a nursing license in light of what has been reported.

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Presently, there are many young women and men to whom that same board will deny a license for so much as one drunk driving conviction, even when that DUI happened years prior to attending nursing school, and that individual has also led an exemplary life since.

But somehow Linton, with a record of numerous prior car crashes, perhaps linked to her alleged failure to stay on her medication, was granted a license. Go figure.

Geneviève Clavreul, Pasadena

The writer is a registered nurse.

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To the editor: Please stop referring to Linton as a nurse in your articles on this tragic crash.

She was not performing any duties as a nurse and certainly not acting as one during the crash. Nurses are highly educated caregivers who preserve life; Linton is accused of taking it.

You do a disservice to the millions of nurses who take the pledge to devote themselves to the welfare of their patients.

Frances S. Stoner, Long Beach

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The writer is a registered nurse.

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To the editor: Reading that Linton was allegedly driving 130 mph prior to the Windsor Hills crash, I wonder why Mercedes-Benz is not also held accountable for those deaths.

No state has a posted speed limit higher than 85 mph, so it’s unconscionable that car manufacturers are allowed to sell vehicles that easily exceed that speed.

Jim Winterroth, Torrance

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