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A 25-year-old father who refuses menial work — what's the matter with millennials?

A 25-year-old father who refuses menial work — what's the matter with millennials?
People line up outside a job fair in Yuma, Ariz., on Oct. 3. (Randy Hoeft / AP)

To the editor: I hope others readers find it stunning that this article’s example of a millennial man who cannot find satisfying work is a 25-year-old father living with his mother who quit his job at a pizzeria and refuses to “take a gig he’ll hate.”

Written as an expository piece, this piece should have been written as an indictment of this infantilized, entitled male. This young man with only a high school diploma is a product of the self-esteem generation. He believes he is entitled to a job that pays what he wants to make, notwithstanding what the market and his skills command.

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All work has dignity. Both Target and Walmart have programs that reward employees with advancement and managerial opportunities. This young man needs to grow up.

Stephanie Summers, Altadena

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To the editor: There is a possible lost generation of millennial men?

Since unemployment numbers are down, the assumption seems to be that anyone who wants a job can get one, regardless of age and employment history (or lack of same). But it’s still the employer’s choice, so why not ask them why they hire more millennial women than men.

Do they get fewer male applicants? Are women more likely to accept low-wage jobs? Are the women more qualified?

I’m disturbed by the suggestion that disabled young men might now “choose” to work. It’s either an insinuation that the disabilities aren’t real, or a stunning lack of appreciation for what it means to be disabled.

Carol Wuenschell, Arcadia

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