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Opinion

Letters to the Editor: Veterans Day is about the honoring veterans, not the wars they fought

Veterans listen as President Trump speaks at a wreath laying ceremony at the New York City Veterans Day Parade on Nov. 11.
Veterans listen as President Trump speaks at a wreath laying ceremony at the New York City Veterans Day Parade on Nov. 11.
(Andrew Harnik / Associated Press)

To the editor: Marine veteran Gil Barndollar’s conclusion, “This Veterans Day, Americans should think less about their warriors and more about their wars,” dishonors those who served.

Since World War II, this country has been involved in wars that have been found ultimately to be based on poor judgment. Those errors are political and regrettably continue because of our leadership (or lack thereof).

Veterans pay the price regardless of the reason. So, it is appropriate and critical that they be honored annually. Whether inducted or volunteered, veterans served their country.

Combat veterans never forget their experiences. Mine are still vivid more than 50 years after I was a battalion surgeon with the Marines in Vietnam from 1967-68.

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Stuart Fisher, Los Angeles

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To the editor: The United States’ endless wars since 1945 were authorized by the president, not, as the Constitution requires, declared by Congress. Therefore, all those wars have been unconstitutional and illegal.

To exist, a democracy requires the citizens’ involvement. Americans’ ignorance and indifference, along with Congress’ ceding of its constitutional power to declare war, confirm that the United States is no longer a true democracy.

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Our widespread unease about the “not worth it” wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and sacrificing our soldiers should escalate to revulsion and outrage at the injuring and killing, mostly by aerial bombing, of hundreds of thousands of innocent people in those countries. All in our name.

The citizens’ ignorance of and indifference to their government’s actions, especially in the world’s most powerful nation, can have dire consequences. History provides many examples how.

Ricardo Nicol, San Clemente

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To the editor: The familiar “thank you for your service” refrain does more to make civilians feel better about themselves than it does to thank the person in uniform.

Paul Burns, Granada Hills


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