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Today’s Headlines: At least 7 killed in mass shootings in Half Moon Bay

two sheriff vehicles at a crime scene
Law enforcement personnel converge on the scene of a shooting in Half Moon Bay.
(Jeff Chiu / Associated Press)
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Hello, it’s Tuesday, Jan. 24, and here are the stories you shouldn’t miss today:

TOP STORIES

Seven killed in mass shootings in Half Moon Bay. At least seven people were killed in two related shootings in the beachside community of Half Moon Bay, law enforcement officials said. Another victim was also found in the area and taken to a hospital with life-threatening injuries.

The suspected shooter, a 67-year-old resident of the community, was arrested about two hours after the shootings, sitting in a parked car at a sheriff’s substation. The motive for the shootings is still unknown, sheriff’s officials said.

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A possible motive for the Monterey Park shooting. The investigation into the mass shooting is focused on the gunman’s prior interactions at two dance studios he targeted and whether jealousy over a relationship was the motive, law enforcement sources said.

The death toll rose to 11 on Monday, after one person injured in the massacre later died at the hospital. The first 10 victims were all in their 50s, 60s or 70s, according to the L.A. County coroner. Only two — My Nhan, 65, and Lilan Li, 63 — have been identified by name.

Here’s what Kevin de León’s constituents have to say. The Times recently polled voters in De León’s council district. The poll found that by more than 2 to 1, voters with unfavorable views of De León outnumber those who view him favorably.

Overall, about 6 in 10 voters told us they had seen, read or heard something recently that had an impact on how they think about De León. About three quarters of those said that what they had learned had made them less favorable to the council member.

More politics

Sign up for our California Politics newsletter to get the best of The Times’ state politics reporting and the latest action in Sacramento.

Has California avoided another devastating winter COVID wave? In the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic, winter holidays were marred by a pair of devastating waves that ripped through California. But the third winter seems to have escaped that same fate.

More top coronavirus headlines

Stay up to date on variant developments, case counts and vaccine news with Coronavirus Today.

January storms leave L.A. County flood-control dams at risk of overflowing. Five reservoirs along south-facing San Gabriel Mountain slopes are filled with so much debris and soupy mud that they pose a flood risk to the communities below.

Another intense storm, they say, could unleash new surges of dirt, toppled trees and boulders down canyons stripped of their binding vegetation by the 2020 Bobcat fire, sending chocolate-colored floodwaters over the dams and into the cities of Arcadia, Sierra Madre, Pacoima, Sun Valley and Sunland.

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These days, waking up to current events can be, well, daunting. If you’re seeking a more balanced news diet, “The Times” podcast is for you. Gustavo Arellano, along with a diverse set of reporters from the award-winning L.A. Times newsroom, delivers the most interesting stories from the Los Angeles Times every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Listen and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

PHOTO OF THE DAY

A woman in a red sweater cries as she crouches by a pile of flowers. A little girl holds more flowers.
A woman and a girl place flowers at a memorial in Monterey Park. Community members gathered for a vigil Sunday to honor the people who were killed by a gunman at a ballroom dance studio.
(Jason Armond / Los Angeles Times)

CALIFORNIA

Gusty winds nearing 100 mph tear through Southern California. Winds tore through Los Angeles County early Monday, and strong gale-like conditions could continue through Tuesday, according to the National Weather Service.

Six finalists were chosen for a memorial to L.A.’s 1871 Chinese Massacre. In 2021, the Los Angeles mayor’s office kicked off a process to create a memorial to honor the 18 Chinese men killed in a brutal mob attack. Art and design columnist Carolina Miranda breaks down the finalist designs.

Amtrak to restore weekend rail service between San Diego and Orange counties. Passenger service has been on hold because of ongoing efforts to stabilize the site of a recurring landslide near San Clemente that was activated again by heavy rain last fall.

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NATION-WORLD

Four Oath Keepers convicted of seditious conspiracy in Jan. 6 insurrection. The verdict marks the conclusion of the second major trial of extremists accused of plotting to forcibly keep former President Trump in power.

Ex-FBI counterintelligence agent aided Russian oligarch, U.S. says. A former high-ranking FBI counterintelligence official who investigated Russian oligarchs has been indicted on charges he secretly worked for one, in violation of U.S. sanctions. The official was also charged, in a separate indictment, with taking cash from a former foreign security officer.

Power grid fails across Pakistan after energy-saving move backfires. Electricity was turned off across Pakistan during low-usage hours overnight to conserve fuel across the country, officials said, leaving technicians unable to boot up the system for most of the country after daybreak.

HOLLYWOOD AND THE ARTS

Here are the 2023 Oscar nominees. The finalists in all 23 categories have been revealed.

We’re following a year in the life of seven Sundance filmmakers. Over the course of the next 12 months, The Times will follow the seven filmmakers from their projects’ Sundance premiere through acquisition, distribution, reception and perhaps even awards, pausing along the way to candidly discuss the joys and challenges of their chosen field.

Maya Rudolph is the new face of M&Ms after an ‘indefinite pause’ on the veteran spokescandies. The pivot comes ahead of the Super Bowl and after the chocolate-covered candy brand inadvertently sparked backlash last year by changing its green mascot’s high-heeled boots to “polarizing” sneakers.

Zoe Saldaña is the first actor to star in four films that broke $2 billion at the box office. This past weekend, Disney and 20th Century Studios’ “Avatar: The Way of Water” entered the $2-billion club, becoming Saldaña’s fourth film to do so.

Polo Polo, Mexican comedian known for live albums and adult humor, dies at 78. Polo Polo’s son Paul García shared news of his father’s death with local outlets, noting he died a “natural death” early Monday morning. Polo Polo suffered from vascular dementia, the Associated Press reported.

BUSINESS

Microsoft invests $10 billion in ChatGPT maker OpenAI. The new support, building on $1 billion Microsoft poured into OpenAI in 2019 and another round in 2021, is intended to give Microsoft access to some of the most popular and advanced artificial intelligence systems.

Spotify reduces staff by 6% as chief content officer departs. Spotify on Monday said it is cutting its staff following a wave of layoffs at other tech and entertainment businesses as they adjust to a challenging economic environment.

OPINION

Why the Monterey Park shooting feels like an attack on Asian America. “These are not just neighborhoods; to many, these are sacred sites of cultural preservation and celebration. Monterey Park represents Asian America, today — how far we’ve come and how we’ve built community despite encountering barrier after barrier.”

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SPORTS

Arte Moreno no longer selling Angels, plans to remain owner for ‘2023 season and beyond.’ The decision comes after the team announced in August it would explore a sale of the team. Moreno bought the Angels for $183.5 million in 2003.

Justin Turner wanted to re-sign with the Dodgers before the plan quickly changed. Turner’s two-year, $22-million contract with the Red Sox marked an awkward end to his memorable nine-year tenure with the Dodgers this winter.

ONLY IN L.A.

L.A. now picks up your compostable food scraps. Here’s what you have to do. The city of Los Angeles was ahead of the curve when it rolled out its composting program in 2019. However, the number of households in the program was slow to expand.

The holdup was infrastructure — building new facilities or upgrading existing facilities to accommodate anaerobic digestion, according to Gerry Villalobos, environmental specialist for the Bureau of Sanitation. That’s finally been addressed. Here’s what you need to know.

FROM THE ARCHIVES

Russian President Joseph Stalin, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill in 1945.
The “Big Three,” Russian President Joseph Stalin, in light uniform, American President Franklin D. Roosevelt, facing the camera, and British prime Minister Winston Churchill, sit together at the final dinner held in connection with the conference at Yalta, Ukraine, in 1945.
(Associated Press)

Former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill died 57 years ago. He was 90 years old. When Churchill took office in 1940, he professed to have “nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat.” He ended up leading the country in helping turn the tide against Adolf Hitler’s Germany, saving England from what seemed an inevitable invasion.

We appreciate that you took the time to read Today’s Headlines! Comments or ideas? Feel free to drop us a note at headlines@latimes.com.


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