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California in Congress

Darrell Issa says he'll vote 'No' on current tax bill: 'We can do better than this'

 (Olamikan Gbemiga / Associated Press)
(Olamikan Gbemiga / Associated Press)

Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Vista) said Tuesday he can’t vote for the current version of the GOP tax bill.

“I think that we can do better than this,” Issa said.

While some of the other 13 Republicans in the California delegation have said they are still reviewing the bill, Issa was the first to indicate he would vote no on the tax overhaul championed by leaders of his party unless changes are made.

He didn’t lay out what changes he’d demand. But he said that while he believes the bill's business tax code changes will stimulate the economy, he doesn’t think the individual tax cuts will do the same, and they'll hit some Americans unevenly.

“They say the average person is going to get a reduction, and yet many, many people in my district are going to see a tax increase because we have wanted to give tax reductions over and above those that stimulate the economy,” said Issa, who is considered one of the most vulnerable members in next year's election. “I am concerned about making sure we don’t give away so much that isn’t economically necessary and then at the same time tell certain people that they have to pay tax increases.”

Issa pointed to the elimination of the deduction on state and local taxes as an example, saying that people shouldn’t be taxed twice on the same money. One in three Californians use the deduction, the loss of which has been a sticking point for members in other high-tax states.

“I don’t think paying your state income tax involuntarily is a loophole,” Issa said. “Very few people would say that state income tax is a loophole.”

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