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There's no way to put a good spin on a 7,000-person migrant caravan heading to the United States

There's no way to put a good spin on a 7,000-person migrant caravan heading to the United States
A Honduran migrant carries his national flag on Oct. 25 as he walks north near Mapastepec, Mexico, as part of a caravan trying to reach the United States, still more than 1,000 miles away. (Rebecca Blackwell / Associated {Press)

To the editor: Fernando Garcia writes in his op-ed article that “an honest observer would find few meaningful differences” between the Central American migrants traveling through Mexico now and those who came between 1892 and 1954.

When my ancestors and my wife’s came, they entered legally through a port of entry and needed to have a place to go to and someone who would be responsible for them.

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Garcia states that the estimated 7,000 people in the caravan don’t amount to much. But if they are let in, it will encourage more mass migration. These people have to live somewhere, and many are young men looking for work who will take jobs away from legal residents.

Where will the housing and employment come from? The U.S. cannot take everyone who wants to come here.

Michael Scully, Cypress

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To the editor: As disingenuousness goes, President Trump may have topped himself with his affected dread of the Central American immigrants’ caravan. In truth, Trump could hardly be more pleased with that caravan’s approach and timing — and intensive media coverage.

How better to induce his base to turn out on Nov. 6?

Oh, sure, Trump blathers on about how such caravans should be stymied by their home countries, as if anyone who suffers extreme crime and poverty shouldn’t be able to seek a better life elsewhere.

No matter, Trump’s disingenuous tweets will persist until election day. ’Tis the season for anti-immigrant rhetoric.

Kendra Strozyk, Cameron Park, Calif.

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To the editor: Looks like Los Angeles will need a lot more tents if this latest wave of immigrants makes it into our country. Where should we house these “asylum seekers”?

I would suggest the broad lawns of Hancock Park and Bel-Air. The Honduran flags the group is waving could be proudly planted there.

Northern California also has room for some of these folks. San Francisco’s Pacific Heights and Presidio areas, where Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) reside, would be perfect.

And let’s not forget we have plenty of room for a huge tent camp on the National Mall in Washington.

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Rick Kern, Incline Village, Nev.

Follow the Opinion section on Twitter @latimesopinion and Facebook.

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