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Letters: Look like the rare time where LeBron James made the wrong play

UCLA transfter portal cartoon for Oct. 19, 2019 edition.
(Jim Thompson / For The Times)

Now we know the correct spelling of LeBron’s last name: Jame$.

Alan Matis

Sherman Oaks

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Maybe someone should tell King James that the oppression of millions by a totalitarian regime is just a wee bit more important than the number of sneakers sold in Canton Province.

Yet, the King has no problem putting forth his jaded opinions on a myriad of subjects irrespective of the timing of those juvenile thoughts. Just shows you how self-absorbed sports royalty is these days.

Joseph Schillmoeller

Gardena

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No, no, no LeBron James! A “difficult week” is when your younger brother has a serious spine neck surgery that may not benefit him and he may be disabled for the rest of his life, not your week in China where you believed that “our” freedom of speech put “so many people” in harms way not only financially, but physically, emotionally and spiritually. Come on!

Kathy Stecher

Upland

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So sorry you were inconvenienced, Mr. James, but the fight against oppression doesn’t depend on your schedule. To the outsider looking in it appears that when money talks, freedom walks.

LeBron missed the opportunity to send a message against communist oppression. Perhaps he would have lost a bit of overseas revenue from his sneakers and bobblehead dolls, but he would have sent a strong message that he stands against oppression in any form.

Michael Rubino

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San Pedro

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Having read LeBron James’ original statement on the China issue and his subsequent efforts to walk it back, I have come to understand what he is really trying to say . Freedom of speech is important but not as important as making money.

Bert Bergen

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La Canada

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LeBron James. All-Star. Champion. Olympic gold medalist. Future first ballot Hall-of-Famer. Lickspittle for a totalitarian regime.

Brian Lipson

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Beverly Hills

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LeBron’s motives have always been the same: winning and the almighty dollar, the latter most likely his main reason for coming to L.A.

Evidently a $35-million salary and a net worth of half a billion aren’t enough.

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Bob Murtha

Santa Maria, Calif.

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How do you say “Show me the money” in Chinese?

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Ken Moreno

Pasadena

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Can you imagine Rosa Parks being told she should have waited before her courageous bus seating protest?

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Mike Sawyer

Denver

Blue funk

I’m so excited about the upcoming 2020 season, I can hardly contain myself. After listening to Andrew Friedman’s news conference, announcing that he and Dave Roberts will be retuning next year, I was thrilled and then shocked to find out that the real culprit in this year’s playoff disaster was really Rick Honeycutt.

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Steve Horvitz

Century City

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Time for fans and sportswriters to cease blaming Roberts, Kershaw and Kelly for the Dodgers’ collapse. The reason they lost is the same reason they’ve lost the past two year in the World Series — they can’t start or sustain a rally because Dodgers hitters, programmed by sabermetric gurus in the front office and a hybrid triumvirate of hi-tech hitting coaches, have mutated into all-or-nothing uppercut swinging robots incapable of playing small ball and repeatedly setting records in strikeouts while failing to put balls in play.

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This works OK during the season, when faux sluggers can feast on garbage pitching staffs and rabbit balls in warm weather, with diluted scouting reports, but in the playoffs, when the weather cools, the pitching becomes daunting, and scouting reports are elevated, faux Dodger sluggers are exposed as one dimensional. With the exception of Turner, there’s not one hitter on the Dodgers who looks like he’s ever played pepper or tried hitting singles and doubles in batting practice.

Their formula simply doesn’t work. Go out and get some single/double hitters.

Dell Franklin

Cayucos

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After reading the comments of Andrew Friedman, I’m convinced the Dodgers must have won the World Series this year. Dave Roberts is a great manager, Kenley Jansen is the best closer in the National League, and Kenta Maeda will return to being a starter, where he routinely pitched for four innings. Hey, even Friedman will also return. Go Dodgers!

Ralph S. Brax

Lancaster

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As Washington swept past St Louis into the World Series, I can’t help but think that Muncy, Seager, Bellinger et al, deserve to be in that position. Everyone in the baseball universe was fine with future Hall of Famer Kershaw’s seventh inning performance. Joe Kelly Dodger setup man would then pitch the eighth and Jansen would close it out. Everyone that is, except manager Dave Roberts and president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman. Anthony Rendon almost ran to the batter’s box in the eighth.

Alex Fernandez

Lakewood

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I couldn’t help but notice you misspelled a player’s name in your story about the Dodgers’ hitting woes vs the Nationals. The correct spelling is “A.J. PollocKKKKKKKKKKK.”

Sean MitchellSanta Monica

Off the grid

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The Rams are pathetic, from the head coach to the rawest rookie, this bunch is incapable of getting its act together. After every game, it’s like a broken record and we hear the same refrain: “We’ve got to clean up the mistakes,” and, “We’ve got to get better” Then, next game, they make more mistakes and they perform even poorer, with absolutely no sense of urgency or passion.

For Pete’s sake, what are these boneheads doing at practice? If the average worker performed his job like these over-paid, underachieving jocks do, he’d be in the unemployment line. If he has any sense of responsibility, Sean McVay needs to light a fire under these laggards.

Lawrence Martin Kates

Los Angeles

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McVay and Goff. “ I’ve got to do a better job”. “It’s on me”. This is a recording.

Russell Hosaka

Torrance

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The Jalen Ramsey trade screams of desperation. They replaced one Pro Bowl cornerback, Marcus Peters, with another, Ramsey, who may be better, but enough to offset the loss of first-round picks next year and the year after? Picks, which at the rate the Rams are going, could be quite attractive.

Jack Wishard

Los Angeles

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I’ve been watching Philip Rivers throw these ducks described as passes for entirely too long. Think what might have been had the Chargers made the decision to keep Drew Brees instead.

Thomas Filip

Moorpark

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Troy story

I read Helene Elliott’s article “How long before the other shoe drops for Helton?” with a certain sense of weariness. I don’t know about anyone else, but I’m getting a little tired of the Clay Helton watch. It’s almost like it’s more important what happens to Clay Helton than what happens to USC football. Given the current lack of a permanent athletic director, most likely nothing will change for the rest of this year, so why don’t we just accept that and get on with reporting what’s going on with USC?

John Fischer

Laguna Beach

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Let’s all thank Pat Haden for his last major act as athletic director for USC. He basically told Ed Orgeron he wasn’t good enough to coach the Trojans and hired Clay Helton instead.

Bill Piercy

Long Beach

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Short trip

I wonder: If the Washington Nationals win the World Series, will they go to the White House?

Mark Berglas

Huntington Beach

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Good question

Can Joe Maddon pitch?

Kelly Gallagher

Santa Ana

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The Los Angeles Times welcomes expressions of all views. Letters should be brief and become the property of The Times. They may be edited and republished in any format. Each must include a valid mailing address and telephone number. Pseudonyms will not be used.

Mail: Sports Viewpoint

Los Angeles Times

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