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263 posts
  • TV
  • Late-night

Minnesota Sen. Al Franken resigned Thursday, the latest development in the sexual harassment saga that continues to envelop Washington, D.C., Hollywood and beyond. 

Franken’s fall from grace did not go without notice by many late-night talk shows, where reactions ranged from disgusted to dismissive.

On “The Daily Show,” Trevor Noah was somber as he played a clip from Franken’s resignation speech before launching into some hard truths about the current politicization of sexual misconduct.

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What’s bigger and scarier than charging dinosaurs? A volcanic eruption filled with charging dinosaurs.  

This we are reminded of — in case we ever forget — in the first full-length trailer for “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom,” which features Chris Pratt’s Owen Grady running from just about everything except that raptor he raised from a baby and his will-they-or-won’t-they banter with Bryce Dallas Howard’s Claire Dearing.

She’s apparently now dating someone way more boring than Owen, but she’s still willing to go for drinks with the raptor keeper. And our heroes are here to help rescue the dinos from an island that’s about to explode. “What could go wrong?” Owen deadpans. 

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  • Birthdays
(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

I feel as though I have been through a crash course in life. It’s been an incredible ride. I've had the highs of meeting my soul mate, but the lows of having my life ripped apart for something I didn't do. I wouldn't change the knowledge I've gained for anything. Just don't ever ask me to repeat it.

Alec Baldwin is doubling down on his Wednesday comments criticizing talk show hosts for turning their platforms from promotional pit stops into punditry.

The “Saturday Night Live” presidential impersonator appeared on “Megyn Kelly Today” on Thursday to discuss his stance and how attitudes toward inappropriate behavior have changed over the years. 

“You certainly want to see everyone who is guilty of something, who have done bad things, wrong things that hurt people, you want to see those people get punished,” Baldwin said. “I don’t want to see innocent people get hurt either.”

Daniel Kaluuya appears in a scene from "Get Out."
Daniel Kaluuya appears in a scene from "Get Out." (Universal Pictures)

“The Big Sick,” “Call Me By Your Name” and “Get Out” continued to earn notice heading into Oscar season as the American Film Institute announced its selections for its AFI Awards.

Selecting 10 films and 10 TV shows that are deemed “culturally and artistically significant,” AFI also recognized the summer blockbuster “Wonder Woman” and Guillermo del Toro’s fantasy romance “The Shape of Water,” which opens in Los Angeles on Friday.

In addition to recognizing blockbuster-level TV series “Game of Thrones” and “Stranger Things 2,” the AFI’s television field also recognized some of this year’s recent Emmy winners in “Big Little Lies” and “The Handmaid’s Tale.”

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(Myles Aronowitz)

Samantha Bee’s feelings toward Hillary Clinton are complicated. But that doesn’t mean she’s going to give the many disgraced media men a pass on how they treated the former presidential candidate in their election coverage. 

On Wednesday night’s episode of “Full Frontal,” Bee addressed reports about the “the network of powerful people that turned a blind eye to Harvey Weinstein’s demonic behavior,” which included “powerful people who should really, really, really, really know better. Really.” 

It turns out Lena Dunham had warned the Clinton campaign about Weinstein’s behavior and suggested that it was not the best idea to have him host fundraising events, according to the New York Times. 

"Both Sides of the Sky," a new collection of previously unreleased Jimi Hendrix recordings, is due March 9.
"Both Sides of the Sky," a new collection of previously unreleased Jimi Hendrix recordings, is due March 9. (PBS)

Another “new” Jimi Hendrix album is on its way, this one pulling together more previously unreleased studio recordings by the celebrated guitarist, singer and songwriter. 

“Both Sides of the Sky,” due March 9, features 10 such recordings, along with three more studio sessions Hendrix made from 1968 to 1970, with a variety of musicians supporting him including those from the original Jimi Hendrix Experience as well as the group he formed later, the Band of Gypsies.

Among the tracks: Hendrix’s interpretation of Muddy Waters’ “Mannish Boy”; a version of Joni Mitchell’s “Woodstock,” also featuring Stephen Stills and recorded before the hit Crosby, Stills & Nash version was released; a Stills original titled “$20 Blues”; and Hendrix originals “Lover Man” and “Hear My Train A-Comin’.”

  • Celebrity
(Lisa O'Connor / Zuma Press/TNS, left; Liz O. Baylen / Los Angeles Times, right)

David Cassidy ended his life proud of daughter Katie Cassidy. He also ended it with a will that specifically cut her out. 

“My father’s last words were ‘So much wasted time,’” she tweeted after he died last month. “This will be a daily reminder for me to share my gratitude with those I love as to never waste another minute.”

David told People in February that he “never” had a relationship with his daughter. “I wasn’t her father. I was her biological father but I didn’t raise her. She has a completely different life.”

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  • Movies
Rami Malek stars as rock icon Freddie Mercury in the upcoming film "Bohemian Rhapsody."
Rami Malek stars as rock icon Freddie Mercury in the upcoming film "Bohemian Rhapsody." (Nick Delaney / 20th Century Fox)

The Freddie Mercury biopic “Bohemian Rhapsody” was shaken this week after the firing of director Bryan Singer, but the show must go on. 

20th Century Fox announced Wednesday that Dexter Fletcher will be filling the film’s director vacancy with production resuming next week in London.

Singer was fired Monday after production on the film was suspended due to his absence. 

Dexter Fletcher / Getty Images
Dexter Fletcher / Getty Images (Larry Busacca)
  • Birthdays
(Ellen Jaskol / Los Angeles Times)

Sometimes, songs come out of other songs. The eggs are always inside other songs waiting to be broken open or fertilized, or released in just the right weather conditions. Who knows why? It's a mystery, and I'm filled with wonder about it. And it's probably why I keep doing it. If it happened every time, I'd stop doing it.

FROM THE ARCHIVES: The lowdown with Tom Waits