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2018 Emmy Nominations: ‘Game of Thrones’ leads with 22 nominations; Netflix tops HBO for the first time

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The 2018 Emmy Award nominations were announced Thursday morning. After a year of ineligibility, “Game of Thrones” returned with a stunning 22 nominations, including best drama. Another HBO drama, “Westworld,” followed closely behind with 21 nominations. Last year’s best drama series winner “The Handmaid’s Tale” drew 20 nominations. Additionally, Sandra Oh made history as the first Asian actress to be nominated for best lead actress in a drama series. On the comedy side, “Saturday Night Live” and “Atlanta” were tops with 21 and 16 nominations, respectively. See the nominations list below as well as analysis and interviews from The Times tied to this year’s nominations.

Emmy nominations: A reflection of America, the bad and the good

Laurie Metcalf, center, with Sara Gilbert and Roseanne Barr in a scene from the new "Roseanne."
(Adam Rose / ABC)

Was it something I said?

The television industry’s stars and creators should have been asking themselves that question Thursday morning when the 70th Primetime Emmy nominations were announced, and the list read more like a political indictment rather than a verdict of what did and didn’t work this year on TV.

The wildly successful reboot of “Roseanne” was almost entirely passed over after Roseanne Barr unleashed a late night/early morning racist tirade on Twitter that cost the comedian her career, scoring only a supporting actress nomination for Laurie Metcalf and her brilliant portrayal of liberal snowflake Jackie.

Contentious HBO talk show host Bill Maher used the N-word on his show during the Emmy eligibility period, and despite an outcry, was slow to apologize. The new nominations marked the first time in three years that “Real Time With Bill Maher,” which has been nominated 10 times previously, wasn’t chosen as a top variety talk series contender – or included in any other category.

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On-screen mother and daughter Cicely Tyson and Viola Davis nominated for same category, different shows

Cicely Tyson, left, and Viola Davis on "How to Get Away With Murder" are nominated for an Emmy in the same category.
(ABC / Mitchell Haaseth)

Cicely Tyson and Viola Davis play on-screen mother and daughter on “How to Get Away With Murder,” but they were nominated for an Emmy in the same category as mother and daughter for different shows.

How does that work?

Well, Tyson, who plays Ophelia Harkness, was nominated Thursday for guest actress in a drama for playing Annalise Keating’s mother in “How to Get Away With Murder.” Meanwhile, Davis, who plays Keating on the same show, earned a nomination in the same category for “Scandal.”

Shonda Rhimes, executive producer of both ABC shows, merged the storylines for a crossover episode where Davis’ Keating seeks help from “Scandal’s” main character, Olivia Pope, played by Kerry Washington.

Both shows congratulated the award-winning actresses on social media Thursday morning.

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Judd Apatow on his Emmy nominations: ‘I had convinced myself that it wasn’t gonna happen’

Apatow's previous TV work includes "Girls," "Freaks and Geeks" and "The Larry Sanders Show."
(Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

Judd Apatow was in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, directing an episode of “Crashing” for HBO when he learned that his documentary, “The Zen Diaries of Garry Shandling,” had been nominated for an Emmy for outstanding documentary, and Apatow for best director in that category.

The film is an exhaustive look at the life and legacy of Shandling, with quite a few revelations and twists along the way.

Was this a surprise?

There are so many incredible docs being made right now that I had convinced myself that it wasn’t gonna happen, mainly out of self-preservation. I brought myself so low that it made this high even better.

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Edgar Ramirez on his Emmy nod for portraying ‘one of the most fascinating characters ever,’ Gianni Versace

Actor Edgar Ramirez will go up against two of his "Assassination of Gianni Versace" costars in the supporting actor category.
(Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times)

Playing the iconic, ill-fated fashion designer Gianni Versace, who was slain by a serial killer in 1997, was a “profound, transformative life experience,” says Edgar Ramirez. But it was the themes of prejudice and homophobia in FX’s “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” that really resonated for the Venezuelan-born actor, who on Thursday earned a supporting actor Emmy nomination for his work.

Where are we catching you?

I’m in Atlanta. I’m shooting a movie here. It’s hot. We’re one week away from shooting and in rehearsals right now. This was just such a surprise, honestly. I was trying not to think too much about it in the days leading up to it, because you never know. You can’t obsess about these things, but when they happen, you celebrate the fact that the show got so much beautiful recognition. I’m very, very happy.

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Benedict Cumberbatch had a very English reaction to news of his sixth Emmy nomination

Previous winner Benedict Cumberbatch earned a nomination for lead actor in a limited series for Showtime's "Patrick Melrose."
(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Benedict Cumberbatch received his sixth Emmy nomination as actor in a limited series for his portrayal of the titular character in Showtime’s pitch-black dramedy “Patrick Melrose.” The show, about an Englishman struggling with rampant addiction rooted in memories of sexual abuse at the hands of his father, is based on a series of autobiographical books by Edward St. Aubyn. The show is as searing as it is hilarious — a heady mixture that attracted Cumberbatch from the start. The actor is in London working on another project and says he completely forgot it was Emmy nominations day.

Where were you when you got the good news?

I was in a car going home from East London where we’re doing some filming for a show about Brexit, and my phone just blew. I thought, ‘Whoa, what’s going on here, is there a malfunction?’ But then I saw, ‘Congratulations, huge love,’ and what not, and that’s how I found out. It was quite lovely.

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Tap dancer Chloe Arnold scores first Emmy nomination for choreography on ‘The Late Late Show’

Chloe Arnold, left, rehearses with sister Maud in downtown Los Angeles.
(Christina House / Los Angeles Times)

Tap dancer and choreographer Chloe Arnold assumed the worst when she got an early-morning phone call from her manager. But when she found out the good news — snagging her first Emmy nomination for choreography on “The Late Late Show With James Corden” — she couldn’t contain her excitement.

She also thought back to her mentor, entertainment mogul and choreographer Debbie Allen.

“I remember when I was a kid, there was a picture of Debbie Allen winning her Emmy — she’s cry-celebrating,” Arnold said. “That was before I knew her. Then I got to see that Emmy at her house, and I just think it’s like it gives you that seed that it’s possible.”

Arnold stands out among five choreography nominations this year — four are from the dance reality show “So You Think You Can Dance.” She has worked with late-night host James Corden for more than 30 episodes, choreographing promos and other prime-time specials. This nomination recognizes her choreography on Corden’s “Crosswalk the Musical” segment, a wacky tribute to “The Greatest Showman.”

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In ‘Game of Thrones’ and ‘Handmaid’s Tale,’ the top Emmy nominees reflect a revolution at different points

Elisabeth Moss, left, and Ann Dowd were both nominated for "The Handmaid's Tale." The show earned 20 nominations.
(George Kraychyk / Hulu)

Blessed be the fruit, or all men must die?

One of these television quotes is encoded with subservience, the other with retribution, but each comes from a powerful drama battling for prominence. The 2018 Emmys race will be about many things, but front and center is the smack-down between HBO’s “Game of Thrones” and Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s Tale.”

Both have multiple nominations — 22 for “Thrones,” 20 for “Handmaid’s” — and both are previous winners for drama series. But “Handmaid’s” won last year, when “Thrones” wasn’t eligible, so this will be the first time the shows are in competition against each other.

Will Westeros or Gilead prevail?

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The Emmys will be full of color, as cultural diversity distinguishes major categories

Actors Brian Tyree Henry, Zazie Beetz, Donald Glover and Lakeith Stanfield attend an event for FX's "Atlanta," which earned 16 nominations.
(Valerie Macon / AFP / Getty Images)

Even as race continues to be one of the most divisive issues in the country, the celebration of cultural diversity is a dominant theme across the 70th Emmy Award nominations. Performers of color and series produced and written by minorities scored numerous nominations Thursday.

“Atlanta,” “black-ish,” “This Is Us” and “Westworld” are among the series receiving big nods that spotlight minorities in major creative and acting roles.

Hollywood has been rocked in recent years by controversies over the lack of awards recognition for people of color. But the stream of performers, producers and writers of color receiving Emmy nominations indicate that the Television Academy at least is placing a greater premium on honoring projects with diverse cultural perspectives.

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Tatiana Maslany talks Emmy nomination and the 12 women she plays in ‘Orphan Black’

Maslany is a previous Emmy winner for her work in "Orphan Black."
(Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

Canadian actress Tatiana Maslany won an Emmy in 2016 for her role in BBC America’s “Orphan Black” as the rebellious Sarah Manning … and as the violent Helena … and as soccer mom Alison Hendrix, along with nine other characters, all clones.

On Thursday morning, she learned she’d again been nominated in the lead actress in a drama category for her work on “Orphan Black.” But her mind was on another role — her New York stage debut that very evening.

Big day for you: The New York premiere of “Mary Page Marlowe” tonight at the Second Stage Theater, in which you play the title role, along with four other actors. And now the Emmy nom. How are you feeling?

I’m very nervous. I’m so excited, but really nervous. And everything that goes along with opening night. I can’t believe I get to do it. And on top of it, to get this news this morning. It was a total shock. I didn’t think people remembered the [TV] show. It’s been off air for a while. And there’s just so much amazing television right now. “Atlanta.” “Handmaid’s Tale” — which I find really difficult to watch. A lot of my friends are watching it and saying, sadly, it resonates so much with what’s happening in our culture. But the Emmy nomination, I’m excited.

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‘Stranger Things’ star David Harbour celebrated his Emmy nomination with a waffle

David Harbour of "Stranger Things" earned his second Emmy nomination for supporting actor in a drama series.
(Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

David Harbour, who plays a tough yet melancholic top cop in Netflix’s “Stranger Things,” scored his second Emmy nomination Thursday for supporting actor in a drama series.

When his girlfriend brought the news of his nomination, Harbour was in the middle of an unglamorous task — teaching his puppy to poop on command.

“It’s so special and so gratifying,” Harbour said of the nomination. “The television being made in this country right now is so wonderful, to be acknowledged by those people … is just a dream come true.”

Speaking of television … what are you watching right now?

I just binged the crap out of [Amazon’s] “Catastrophe.” It’s a very different show than “Stranger Things” — it’s just so fun and beautiful. I actually went back and watched all of “True Detective’s” Season 1 again, which I think is a true masterpiece.

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Sandra Oh on her historical Emmy nomination: ‘Let’s move it forward’

Oh was previously nominated five times in the supporting actress category for her work on "Grey's Anatomy."
(Katie Falkenberg / Los Angeles Times)

Just days away from beginning production on Season 2 of BBC America’s “Killing Eve,” Sandra Oh was reviewing script drafts at her London flat the moment she made Emmy history.

Her part in the thriller is her first headlining role, and it yielded her first lead actress in a drama nod when Emmy nominations were announced Thursday. But the firsts didn’t end there: Oh’s nomination carries an added layer of distinction because it makes her the first person of Asian descent to be recognized in the category in the award show’s 70-year run.

At a time when Hollywood is reckoning with calls for greater inclusiveness, the historic aspect of Oh’s nomination serves as yet another sobering reminder of the industry’s deep-rooted diversity problem.

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Henry Winkler on his Emmy nod: ‘I literally don’t have the words’

Henry Winkler portrays an acting coach in "Barry," which earned 13 nominations total.
(Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

Despite a long and storied career, Henry Winkler said he was overcome with joy when he found out about his nomination for supporting actor in a comedy for the HBO show “Barry” (in which he plays hilarious acting teacher Gene Cousineau). Winkler is currently in Iola, Wis., to sign copies of his children’s book “Everybody Is Somebody #12 (Here’s Hank),” but he was still in bed, having breakfast, when his eldest son called him with the good news.

How are you feeling right now?

I’m unbelievably good. I am thrilled, because not only did I get a nomination, but the show got one, and [creators] Bill [Hader, also the star] and Alec [Berg] got nominated. I’m just over the moon. I literally am speechless.

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Samantha Bee talks Emmy noms and Ivanka Trump flap: ‘I’m not afraid to court controversy’

Samantha Bee was nominated both for her weekly TBS show "Full Frontal" as well as the special she did on Puerto Rico.
(Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

Samantha Bee is the lone woman on the list of Emmy nominees for variety talk series. On her TBS show “Full Frontal With Samantha Bee,” she bravely and loudly voices her opinions about politics and the stew of controversial current events that have riveted the world this year, but she didn’t feel brave on Emmy nominations morning. She was literally hiding (“like a total chicken”) at the hair salon, getting her roots done with a head full of tinfoil, while her staff livestreamed the nominations in the office.

How does this kind of validation feel?

I felt a great sense of happiness, and then I regretted that move [of going to the salon] because everyone was celebrating at the office, and I haven’t seen them yet. The Champagne is flowing. It’s a good day for a million different reasons, but I’m so happy that our Puerto Rico special was nominated.

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Pamela Adlon scores Emmy nomination despite Louis C.K. scandal

Pamela Adlon earned an Emmy nomination Thursday morning, despite her show's association with Louis C.K.
(Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

Like Laurie Metcalf, Pamela Adlon survived scandal to hear her name called on Emmy-nominations morning.

Adlon earned a nod for lead actress in a comedy series for her work on FX’s “Better Things,” which she also created.

Although she was first recognized by the Television Academy last year for her “Better Things” performance, a second nomination was in question because of her association with troubled comedian Louis C.K.

C.K. served as an executive producer on the first and second seasons of “Better Things.” He also directed several episodes, and was the only other writer who worked on Season 2, other than Adlon herself.

However, the comedian and “Louie” creator-star was accused of sexual misconduct by five women in November. He soon released a statement confirming that the allegations were true, at which point FX severed ties with him and his production company, Pig Newton.

Going forward, he will not be listed as an executive producer on the series.

Like Adlon, Metcalf managed to earn an Emmy nomination for supporting actress in a comedy series despite the controversial tweets sent by “Roseanne” star and creator Roseanne Barr, which led to the sitcom’s abrupt cancellation.

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‘It is what it is’: Mark Duplass talks first Emmy nomination for ‘Wild Wild Country’

Duplass earned his first Emmy nomination Thursday for the acclaimed docuseries "Wild Wild Country."
(Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

Netflix’s “Wild Wild Country,” about an Oregon religious group — sex cult? — led by the Indian mystic Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, snagged an Emmy nomination Wednesday for documentary series. It is executive producer Mark Duplass’ first Emmy nomination.

But at home in his pajamas, shortly after learning of the award nomination, Duplass seemed mostly pleased for series directors Maclain Way and Chapman Way.

You seem so calm, business as usual today…

You know, I’m in my house, having my second cup of coffee. I just finished dropping off my niece at her acting class. Emmy noms are incredible to bring awareness to the show, but the truth of the matter is: It is what it is. It’s not something I’m gonna stop my life for. I’d say the predominant feeling is just pride for the Way brothers.

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Megan Amram earns two Emmy noms for her show about really wanting an Emmy

TV writer Megan Amram’s plan to win an Emmy is now in full swing after receiving two Emmy nominations for her short form comedy series, “An Emmy for Megan.”

Amram — whose writing credits include “The Good Place,” “Parks and Recreation” and “Silicon Valley” — created the web series in April with the purpose of getting the Television Academy’s attention for Emmy consideration.

“It worked,” she tweeted Thursday morning after the nominations were announced.

The comedy writer played to and mocked the category’s minimal rule requirements on the show, which streams on Vimeo. Per Hollywood tradition, Amram purchased a billboard to launch her campaign.

Amram plays a fictionalized version of herself and name drops celebrities she knows in various episodes to keep the audience engaged during each episode, though the episodes are just long enough to qualify as a TV show, some ending at a little over two minutes in length.

“An Emmy for Megan” received nominations for actress in a short form comedy or drama series and short form comedy or drama series.

And Amram is serious about wanting to win.

“But remember: it’s not called #TwoNominationsForMegan, it’s called #AnEmmyForMegan,” she tweeted Thursday. “Because what matters is that trophy. SEE YOU ON THE WINNER’S PODIUM/STAGE”

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Emmy snubs and surprises: New faces are in, old institutions are out and Sandra Oh makes history

Ted Danson was nominated for best lead actor in a comedy series for his work on the sophomore series "The Good Place."
(Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

Emmy voters remembered how much they loved Tatiana Maslany and Ted Danson, didn’t have much patience for “Twin Peaks” and finally embraced Trevor Noah’s vision for “The Daily Show.”

Yes, Emmy nominations day wouldn’t be complete without the annual airing of grievances, globally trademarked as Snubs and Surprises, though given the depth of choices available to voters, a “snub” isn’t really a snub, a word that implies an active rebuff. What we’re talking about are more like omissions. Unless it’s Jimmy Fallon. Then, yes, dude was snubbed, even after going on an apology tour for tousling Donald Trump’s hair.

But this year’s slate of nominations showed a little bit more creativity than the past, even if some of the choices were a little bit odd. (Nominating a record five “Saturday Night Live” cast members for a so-so season that often found the ensemble shunted aside for guest players is just bizarre.)

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Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Issa Rae and Ricky Martin among Emmys’ first-time performer nominees

Nikolaj Coster-Waldau as Jaime Lannister in "Game of Thrones."
(Macall B. Polay / HBO)

Thirty-six actors and actresses earned Primetime Emmy nominations on Thursday for work they did in front of the camera.

The new performance-category faces include TV veterans, such as late-night host James Corden and “Saturday Night Live” fixtures Aidy Bryant and Kenan Thompson, who all had nominations in off-camera roles in previous years. (Likewise, many of these other first-timers have been Emmy-nominated before for non-performer categories.)

Rising stars Issa Rae (“Insecure”), Tiffany Haddish (“SNL”) and Yvonne Strahovski (“The Handmaid’s Tale”) also received recognition, as did Strahovsi’s costar and onscreen husband, Joseph Fiennes.

Meanwhile, “Game of Thrones” actor Nikolaj Coster-Waldau (a.k.a. Jaime Lannister), “The Crown” royals Matt Smith and Vanessa Kirby and “The Assassination of Gianni Versace” stars Darren Criss, Ricky Martin and Penélope Cruz are also in the running for acting awards alongside several costars who’ve been nominated in performance categories before.

Musician John Legend, who already has several Grammys, an Oscar and a Tony Award, was nominated for NBC’s “Jesus Christ Superstar: Live in Concert,” putting him in the running for lofty EGOT status if he wins. His “Jesus Christ Superstar” costars Sara Bareilles and Brandon Victor Dixon also received their first Emmy nods.

Here’s the complete list of this year’s first-time performer nominees:

  • Megan Amram, “An Emmy For Megan”
  • Sara Bareilles, “Jesus Christ Superstar: Live in Concert”
  • Zazie Beetz, “Atlanta”
  • Jessica Biel, “The Sinner”
  • Cameron Britton, “Mindhunter”
  • Aidy Bryant, “Saturday Night Live”
  • James Corden, “James Corden’s Next James Corden”
  • Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, “Game of Thrones”
  • Darren Criss, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
  • Penélope Cruz, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
  • Alexis Denisof, “I Love Bekka & Lucy”
  • Brandon Victor Dixon, “Jesus Christ Superstar: Live in Concert”
  • Joseph Fiennes, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
  • Lee Garlington, “Broken”
  • Betty Gilpin, “GLOW”
  • Matthew Goode, “The Crown”
  • Naomi Grossman, “Ctrl Alt Delete”
  • Tiffany Haddish, “Saturday Night Live”
  • Melvin Jackson Jr., “This Eddie Murphy Role is Mine, Not Yours”
  • Kelly Jenrette, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
  • Diarra Kilpatrick, “American Koko”
  • Vanessa Kirby, “The Crown”
  • John Legend, “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert”
  • Ricky Martin, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
  • Kelli O’Hara, “The Accidental Wolf”
  • Adina Porter, “American Horror Story: Cult”
  • Destorm Power, “Caught The Series”
  • Issa Rae, “Insecure”
  • Jimmi Simpson, “Westworld”
  • Matt Smith, “The Crown”
  • Yvonne Strahovski, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
  • Michael Stuhlbarg, “The Looming Tower”
  • Miles Tagtmeyer, “Broken”
  • Kenan Thompson, “Saturday Night Live”
  • Katt Williams, “Atlanta”
  • Letitia Wright, “Black Museum (Black Mirror)”

For the complete list of nominees, click here.

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Netflix nudges past HBO to top Emmy nominations list with 112

Claire Foy and Matt Smith in "The Crown."
(Robert Viglasky / Netflix)

Netflix dethroned HBO, the longtime king of Emmy nominations, Thursday by hauling in 112 Emmy Awards nominations — the most of any network.

HBO, which has been the industry leader for nearly two decades, came in second with 108 nominations. However, HBO’s ambitious “Game of Thrones” scored the most nominations of any series in television with 22, including in the most coveted category of outstanding drama.

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Jessica Biel discusses earning her first Emmy nomination for ‘The Sinner’

In addition to starring in season one of "The Sinner," Biel also served as an executive producer on the anthology series.
(Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

In the wake of the tragic deaths of Anthony Bourdain and Kate Spade earlier this year, an even brighter media spotlight has shone on mental health issues, particularly depression and suicide — which gives even more resonance to Jessica Biel’s mother with ambiguous, violent tendencies, in USA Network’s “The Sinner.”

On Thursday, Biel was nominated for an Emmy for lead actress in a limited series for her role as Cora — a complex character who is not only entertaining to play, she says, but has given her a vehicle to address some pretty weighty and topical issues.

Where are we catching you this morning and how did you find out you were nominated?

I live in L.A. and New York — but currently I’m in Amsterdam. It’s early evening here – my husband [Justin Timberlake] is on tour. So it was like 5 p.m. for me when I found out — I’d just gotten off a plane from London, I was sitting in the car with my kid.

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Donald Glover and Bill Hader earn five Emmy nominations apiece

Donald Glover picked up multiple Emmy nominations Thursday morning.
(Richard Shotwell / Invision/Associated Press)

Donald Glover and Bill Hader are putting the multi into multihyphenate.

The two earned five Emmy nominations apiece Thursday morning.

Glover earned nods for lead actor in a comedy series, directing for a comedy series, and writing for a comedy series — all for his sophomore season of FX’s “Atlanta.”

His fourth nomination came for guest actor in a comedy series from when he hosted “Saturday Night Live” this past season.

Hader was also nominated for lead actor in a comedy series, directing in a comedy series and writing for a comedy series for his rookie HBO comedy “Barry.” Like Glover, Hader was also nominated for guest actor in a comedy series for his turn hosting “Saturday Night Live.”

In addition to their individual nominations, both Glover and Hader were nominated as producers on their comedy series, which will duke it out for comedy series.

This is the second year in a row Glover has earned at least four nods. Last year, he took home the Emmy Awards for lead actor and directing.

In total, “Atlanta” drew 16 nominations — the most of any comedy series, while “Barry” pulled in 13.

See the complete list of nominations here.

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John Legend is one letter away from EGOT status with new Emmy nomination

John Legend with Sara Bareilles in "Jesus Christ Superstar: Live in Concert."
(Virginia Sherwood / NBC)

First-time nominee John Legend is now just an Emmy Award away from EGOT status, scoring a nomination Thursday that could make the elusive acronym a reality.

Legend got a nod for actor in a limited series or movie for his work on the NBC special “Jesus Christ Superstar: Live in Concert,” giving him a shot at winning all four major entertainment honors: Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, Tony.

The 39-year-old is joined on EGOT’s doorstep by fellow “Jesus Christ Superstar” nominees Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice, who were executive producers. Lyricist Rice also wrote the book. The two have been Emmy-nominated in the past.

In addition to Legend’s 10 Grammy Awards from 28 nominations, he won an original song Oscar in 2015 for “Glory” (from the film “Selma”) and a Tony in 2017 as a producer on “Jitney,” which took the award for best play revival.

When the Emmy Awards are handed out in September, Legend, Webber and Rice could join the dozen current EGOT winners — Whoopi Goldberg, Mel Brooks, Audrey Hepburn and Rita Moreno, among them — who’ve conquered those four competitive categories.

Barbra Streisand, Liza Minnelli, Harry Belafonte and Quincy Jones are among the six other EGOTs who’ve hit that fabled milestone thanks to noncompetitive honors along the way.

“Jesus Christ Superstar: Live in Concert” notched a total of 13 nominations, including one for outstanding live variety special.

Click here for more of The Times’ coverage of Thursday’s Emmy nominations.

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Bill Hader was shooting ‘IT 2' when he received his comedy series Emmy nom for ‘Barry’

Bill Hader earned five nominations Thursday, including best lead actor in a comedy series.
(Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

Bill Hader stepped into the Emmy spotlight Thursday with “Barry,” the show he co-created with Alec Berg. It earned multiple nominations, including for comedy series and lead actor in a comedy series. Hader plays the title character — a former Marine turned hit man who follows a mark from the Midwest to Los Angeles, where he gets bitten by the acting bug.

Where were you when you found out the good news?

I’m in a hotel in Hamilton, outside of Toronto shooting “IT 2.” We were up all night shooting. I had gone to the gym [and] was eating breakfast and then my phone started blowing up. I was so tired and turned around that I forget that today was Thursday and Emmy nominations. Not that I don’t care.

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Laurie Metcalf emerges from the ashes of ‘Roseanne’ with an Emmy nomination

Laurie Metcalf earned an Emmy nomination for supporting actress in a comedy series for her work on "Roseanne."
(Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

Some actresses are as good as gold, but Laurie Metcalf is something even better. She’s good as Teflon.

The decorated actress, who has taken home two Tony Awards and an Oscar nomination in the past two years, just earned another feather in her cap — this one maybe the most unlikely of all.

After the ABC revival of “Roseanne” was canceled in the wake of racist tweets by its eponymous star, Roseanne Barr, Emmy prospects looked grim for the cast members left behind.

But never count Metcalf out at the Emmys.

The actress earned a nomination for supporting actress in a comedy for her portrayal of Jackie Harris. Her nomination was one of only two for “Roseanne,” which also earned a nod for multi-camera editing Thursday morning.

Metcalf’s nomination was right in line with her previous Emmys recognition. During the original run of “Roseanne,” Metcalf was nominated three times for her work as Harris and won all three times.

Can she keep her streak alive? Find out when the Emmys are handed out on Sept. 17.

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Lin-Manuel Miranda, RuPaul, Tiffany Haddish and more react to Emmy nominations

It’s Emmy nominations morning, and Hollywood is overflowing with stars celebrating their recognition.

From social media missives to statements from publicists, everyone was excited to be embraced by the Television Academy.

Comedian Tiffany Haddish, who was nominated for her work hosting “Saturday Night Live,” slyly suggested that she might buy a new dress for the occasion. (Does that mean she’s retiring that famous Alexander McQueen dress she got plenty of use out of last awards season?)

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Jonathan Van Ness is nominated for ‘Gay of Thrones’ and ‘Queer Eye’ — and he ‘can’t even’

"Queer Eye" star Jonathan Van Ness, right, scored his second Emmy nomination Thursday.
(Netflix)

“Queer Eye’s” Jonathan Van Ness scored his second Emmy nomination Thursday morning — and he “can’t even,” as one of his famous taglines goes.

Bonus? Van Ness is basking in the glory of four more nominations for Netflix’s “Queer Eye,” which features the hairstylist guru in all his fabulous splendor.

Van Ness, along with Erin Gibson, Kate Lilly, Matt Mazany and Ross Buran, is nominated for Funny or Die’s “Gay of Thrones,” for which he is an executive producer. Van Ness was previously nominated in 2016 for his work on the series.

The eight-episode show reviews HBO’s Emmy-sweeping drama “Game of Thrones,” which Van Ness recaps with his signature sass right from the salon chair.

Van Ness also uses his self-care abilities and over-the-top personality with Fab 5 costars Karamo Brown, Bobby Berk, Antoni Porowski and Tan France in “Queer Eye.”

“Oh my god,” Van Ness wrote on Twitter on Thursday morning. “… Thank you sooo much @funnyordie @netflix I’m so grateful.”

The Netflix reboot of “Queer Eye” received four Emmy nominations for structured reality program, casting for a reality program, cinematography for a reality program and picture editing for a structured or competition reality program.

“To be recognized in this way moves me to tears,” Van Ness wrote on Instagram. “The gratitude, the love, gahhhhhh!!”

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‘Modern Family’ shut out of Emmys’ comedy series category

Eric Stonestreet, left, and Jesse Tyler Ferguson in "Modern Family."
(Tony Rivetti)

For the first time in eight years, “Modern Family” will not compete for an Emmy for outstanding comedy series come September.

The long-running ABC half-hour show, which has won five times for comedy series, was shut out of the race when nominations were announced Thursday morning.

This year saw a sleuth of newcomers invade the category, including HBO’s “Barry” and Amazon’s “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” which earned 13 and 14 nominations, respectively.

In addition to missing out on the comedy series category, the stars of “Modern Family” failed to earn nominations for the first time ever. The show boasts several previous Emmy winners, including Julie Bowen, Ty Burrell and Eric Stonestreet.

“Modern Family” earned just one nomination, for sound mixing for a comedy or drama series (half-hour) and animation.

See the complete list of nominations here.

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Here’s how many 2018 Emmy nods each show and platform received

(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

“Game of Thrones,” “Saturday Night Live,” “Westworld” and “The Handmaid’s Tale” collected the most Emmy Award nominations on Thursday morning.

Meanwhile, the platform breakdown saw streaming giant Netflix oust premium cable channel HBO from the top of the nominations tally. Netflix racked up 112 nods while HBO earned 108. Trailing were broadcaster NBC with 78 nominees and cable network FX with 50.

“It’s been another record-breaking year with more than 9,100 entries in 122 unique categories for the initial nomination round of voting,” Television Academy Chairman and CEO Hayma Washington said in a statement. “The continued growth of the industry has provided opportunities for acclaimed new programs to emerge, while allowing last season’s breakthrough programs to thrive.”

Here’s a breakdown of the nominees by show, with five or more nominations, and platform, with 10 or more nominations, according to the academy.

BY SHOW

  • “Game of Thrones” (HBO): 22
  • “Saturday Night Live” (NBC): 21
  • “Westworld” (HBO): 21
  • “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu): 20
  • “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX): 18
  • “Atlanta” (FX): 16
  • “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Prime Video): 14
  • “Barry” (HBO): 13
  • “The Crown” (Netflix): 13
  • “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert” (NBC): 13
  • “Godless” (Netflix): 12
  • “Stranger Things” (Netflix): 12
  • “GLOW” (Netflix): 10
  • “RuPaul’s Drag Race” (VH1): 10
  • “The Voice” (NBC): 10
  • “Last Week Tonight With John Oliver” (HBO): 9
  • “Twin Peaks” (Showtime): 9
  • “The Oscars” (ABC): 8
  • “This Is Us” (NBC): 8
  • “American Horror Story: Cult” (FX): 7
  • “Genius: Picasso” (National Geographic): 7
  • “Jane”: 7
  • “Silicon Valley” (HBO): 7
  • “USS Callister (Black Mirror)” (Netflix): 7
  • “The Alienist” (TNT): 6
  • “Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown” (CNN): 6
  • “Dancing With the Stars” (ABC): 6
  • “black-ish” (ABC): 5
  • “Blue Planet II” (BBC America): 5
  • “The Defiant Ones” (HBO): 5
  • “Fahrenheit 451” (HBO): 5
  • “Ozark” (Netflix): 5
  • “Patrick Melrose” (Showtime): 5
  • “So You Think You Can Dance” (Fox): 5
  • “Wild Wild Country” (Netflix): 5
  • “Will & Grace” (NBC): 5

Los Angeles Times complete Emmy Awards database

BY PLATFORM

  • Netflix: 112
  • HBO: 108
  • NBC: 78
  • FX Networks: 50
  • CBS: 34
  • ABC: 31
  • Hulu: 27
  • Prime Video: 22
  • Showtime: 21
  • National Geographic: 17
  • FOX: 16
  • VH1: 12
  • CNN: 10

For the complete list of nominees, click here.

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Anthony Bourdain nominated posthumously for ‘Parts Unknown’ Emmy

Anthony Bourdain with his Emmy in 2015.
Anthony Bourdain with his Emmy in 2015.
(Chris Pizzello / Associated Press)

Anthony Bourdain was nominated posthumously for an Emmy in the outstanding informational series or special category Thursday morning, giving him a chance to earn his fifth TV honor come September.

CNN’s “Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown” notched a total of six nominations for 2018, five of them in Creative Arts Emmy categories.

Since 2010, the celebrity chef and world traveler had earned four Emmy statues for the show along with a host of nominations in various categories for it, “The Taste” and “Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations.”

Appreciation: Anthony Bourdain, 1956-2018

“[I]t is not a travel show, really, or a food show, but an encyclopedia of human variety, ingenuity, adaptation, survival and aspiration,” Times TV critic Robert Lloyd said of “Parts Unknown” in June.

“Where most travel-based shows have a touristic bent, Bourdain’s, which ranged from Korea to Koreatown, Iran to Antarctica, Chicago to Shanghai to Borneo to Senegal, were never about where you, as a viewer, as a consumer, could go — he often went places you couldn’t — and what to do when you got there,” Lloyd wrote.

“Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath” on A&E, “My Next Guest Needs No Introduction With David Letterman” on Netflix, “StarTalk With Neil deGrasse Tyson” on National Geographic and “Vice” on HBO are also nominated for informational series or special for 2018.

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The complete list of 2018 Emmy nominees

The nominations for the 2018 Emmy Awards were announced today in Los Angeles. The 70th Primetime Emmy Awards will take place Sept. 17 at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles. The ceremony will be hosted by Michael Che and Colin Jost.

Drama series:

“The Americans”

“The Crown”

“Game of Thrones”

“The Handmaid’s Tale”

“Stranger Things”

“This Is Us”

“Westworld”

Comedy series:

“Atlanta”

“Barry”

“black-ish”

“Curb Your Enthusiasm”

“Glow”

“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”

“Silicon Valley”

“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”

Read the full list

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For ‘Killing Eve’ star Sandra Oh, an Emmy nomination that will go down in history

Sandra Oh stars in BBC America's "Killing Eve," about a bored M15 officer who matches wits with a charming, shrewd assassin.
Sandra Oh stars in BBC America’s “Killing Eve,” about a bored M15 officer who matches wits with a charming, shrewd assassin.
(Katie Falkenberg)

Sandra Oh’s first headlining TV role in BBC America’s “Killing Eve” has yielded her first lead actress in a drama Emmy nomination — and a place in history.

Oh’s nomination Thursday carries an added layer of distinction because it makes her the first person of Asian descent to be nominated in the category in the 70-year run of the award show.

At a time when Hollywood is reckoning with calls for greater inclusivity, the historic aspect of Oh’s nomination serves as another sobering reminder of the industry’s deep-rooted diversity problem.

Not that reminders are needed. It was only three years ago that Viola Davis stood up on the Emmy stage as the first African American winner in the category for her role in “How to Get Away With Murder.” And just last year, Donald Glover made history as the first black person to win the Emmy for directing his comedy series “Atlanta.”

Oh, however, is not an Emmy newcomer. The 46-year-old actress scored five supporting Emmy nominations during her 10-year run as Dr. Cristina Yang in ABC’s popular “Grey’s Anatomy.”

Hailing from the mind of Phoebe Waller-Bridge (“Fleabag”), “Killing Eve” premiered in April on BBC America to critical acclaim and, week after week, had viewers taking notice of Oh’s quirky and layered performance as Eve Polastri, a brainy British intelligence agent who becomes fixated with the young female assassin (Jodie Comer) she’s tracking.

The thriller steadily established itself as a bright spot for BBC America through word of mouth. It yielded weekly ratings growth over the course of its eight-episode run, and its finale garnered 1.25 million total viewers when viewing over three days is tallied, up 86% from its premiere. The cable network wasted little time in renewing the series for a second season.

“Killing Eve” marks Oh’s most noticeable return to television since her exit from “Grey’s Anatomy” in 2014. Since then, she took on other roles on screen and stage, including as a social worker in the third season of ABC’s “American Crime” and as a writing professor in the local staging of Julia Cho’s “Office Hour.”

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How to watch Thursday’s Emmy nominations

Anna Chlumsky and Shemar Moore announce last year's Emmy nominations at the Television Academy's Wolf Theatre.
(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

And the nominees are…

After months of FYC events, mailers and billboards, the official nominations announcement for the 70th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards is mere hours away. “The Handmaid’s Tale” Emmy-nominated actress Samira Wiley and “The Blacklist” grad Ryan Eggold are set to unveil this year’s nominees from the Wolf Theatre at the Television Academy in North Hollywood.

Fittingly, the question on every TV fan’s mind is: How can I watch at home?

Beginning at 11:30 a.m. EST/8:30 a.m. PDT, the nominations ceremony will be available to livestream here via Emmys.com.

Although many of the featured categories are the same year in and year out, the Academy usually manages to sneak in a surprise or two, such as last year when Shemar Moore revealed that his nominations copresenter Anna Chlumsky had been nominated once again for best supporting actress in a comedy series for her work on “Veep.”

With perennial favorite “Veep” out of the running this year due to an extended hiatus, the comedy categories promise a few more surprises come Thursday morning.

After the nominations are announced, hit refresh on this blog for analysis, reactions and much more.

Envelope Emmy roundtables 2018: Watch the full interviews and more

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Critic’s picks for Emmy nominations: Love for Kristen Bell, ‘Twin Peaks’ and … ‘Detectorists’

Nicole LaLiberte and Kyle MacLachlan appear in a scene from "Twin Peaks."
(Suzanne Tenner / Showtime)

I want to say first that I find the Emmys nonsensical. Giving out trophies for something as various and impossible to quantify as creative work seems to me not just silly, but actually inimical to creativity, which does not need your stinking badges and, indeed, suffers when it strives to win them. Nevertheless, I offer these names, which might as easily be (many) others, in the spirit of spreading the love.

Comedy series: “Detectorists” (Acorn TV). Written and directed by and starring Mackenzie Crook, this beautiful pastoral comedy — set around metal-detecting hobbyists searching for Saxon gold and spiritual connection — makes a song out of the present and past, what changes and what remains.

Drama series: “Twin Peaks: The Return” (Showtime). Superbly unaccountable, the extremely belated, happily inconclusive third and final season of David Lynch’s Northwest noir supernatural comic melodrama was a show in which you not only never knew what would happen next, but how it would happen – as farce, horror, in color or black and white, a tribute to Georges Méliès, or something made by people who had never worked a camera before.

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Critic’s picks for Emmy nominations: Expect ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ and ‘Atlanta’

Elisabeth Moss, pictured here, won the best actress Emmy for her performance in the drama last year.
(George Kraychyk / Hulu)

Drama series

I’d love to root for something new — a show that hasn’t been nominated or won before, or perhaps a series that just debuted — but nothing on television beats the second season of Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s Tale.” This year, the dark drama stretched its dystopian narrative beyond the Margaret Atwood novel from which it was adapted and hit even closer to the bone in its themes of subjugation, authoritarianism and religious persecution. All that, and it also managed to make a tune covered by the Bay City Rollers sound meaningful. Close behind, however, are other shows familiar to the Emmys where women ruled: “Game of Thrones” and “The Crown.” And if the world were turned upside down? “Stranger Things.”

Actor, drama

As the self-absorbed, cruel patriarch John Paul Getty of “Trust,” Donald Sutherland elevated this compelling original drama from good to great with a stellar performance. Even if you have seen that other drama about the 1970s kidnapping of John Paul Getty III, this narrative (helmed by director Danny Boyle) lays bare the moral bankruptcy of the world’s wealthiest man.

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Emmys 2018: Five races we’ll be watching when nominations are announced

Kit Harington as Jon Snow and Peter Dinklage as Tyrion Lannister in a scene from the Season 7 series finale of HBO's "Game of Thrones."

Five first-year TV shows earned Emmy nominations last year for best drama series, offering a rare, almost revolutionary jolt of change to a set of awards that, over the years, have celebrated monotony and excellence in equal measure.

This being the Emmys, all five of those series — “The Handmaid’s Tale,” “Stranger Things,” “The Crown,” “This Is Us” and “Westworld” — are expected to be nominated again this year … and probably the year after that … and … you get the idea. Emmy story lines revolve around whether a particular program or performance will finally fall out of favor (I’m looking at you, “Modern Family”) as much as which shows will break through with voters.

That being said, this year’s Emmy races offer a few areas of interest beyond the same old, same old. Here are five I’ll be paying close attention to when the nominations are revealed Thursday morning.

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This year, the path to the Emmys goes through the Arby’s takeout window

Zach Galifianakis serves customers during the FYC event for FX's "Baskets" at Arby's on May 29 in Los Angeles.
(Glenn Whipp / Los Angeles Times)

On a recent weekday morning, Zach Galifianakis manned the drive-through window at the Arby’s on Sunset Boulevard, handing out roast beef sandwiches to Television Academy members who had exclusive run of the place for an Emmy event promoting the FX comedy series “Baskets.”

Later that evening, many of those same Emmy voters made their way downtown to the opulent hipster haven Ace Hotel, where they enjoyed gourmet sandwiches (cucumbers took precedence over red meat) from beloved L.A. bakery Joan’s on Third before a “This Is Us” for-your-consideration screening. (“Feel free to film, tweet and photograph this event using the hashtag #ThisIsUsFYC,” a publicist firmly suggested following a sizzle reel outlining myriad reasons to vote for the NBC series.)

With hundreds of TV shows submitting more than 9,000 entries for Emmy consideration, sometimes you need to be firm with direction. Emmy voting begins Monday, and the Television Academy’s 23,000-plus members are eyeing the towering stacks of (unwatched) screeners sitting on the floors of their offices and perhaps pondering ways to lose the weight they gained from three solid months of attending dinners and parties designed to sway their decision.

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